Tit in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does tit mean? Is tit a Scrabble word?

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Is tit a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word tit is a Scrabble US word. The word tit is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

T1I1T1

Is tit a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word tit is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

T1I1T1

Is tit a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word tit is a Words With Friends word. The word tit is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

T1I1T1

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Valid words made from Tit

You can make 3 words from 'tit' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'tit'

TIT 3 

2 letters words from 'tit'

IT 2TI 2

All 3 letters words made out of tit

tit itt tti tti itt tit

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word tit. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in tit.

Definitions and meaning of tit

tit

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English tit, titte, tette, from Old English tit, titt, from Proto-Germanic *titt- (teat; nipple; breast), of expressive origin.

Perhaps related to an original meaning “to suck”; compare Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁-y-. Doublet of teat, which was borrowed from Old French.

Alternative forms

  • tet (in certain senses only)

Noun

tit (plural tits)

  1. (now often considered vulgar) A mammary gland, teat.
  2. (slang, vulgar, chiefly in the plural) A woman's breast.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:breast
    • 2012, Caitlin Moran, Moranthology, Ebury Press 2012, p. 13:
      I have enjoyed taking to my writing bureau and writing about poverty, benefit reform and the coalition government in the manner of a shit Dickens, or Orwell, but with tits.
  3. (Britain, derogatory, slang) An idiot; a fool.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:idiot
    • 2002, Dick Plamondon, Have You Ever Been Screwed,[1] iUniverse, →ISBN, page 234,
      “What did you say to the cops?” / “I told them everything about the smuggling ring.” / “Why the fuck did you do that?” / “They were nice to me.” / “They’re always nice to people they want to get information from, you dumb tit.”
    • 2012 January 15, Stephen Thompson, "The Reichenbach Fall", episode 2-3 of Sherlock, 00:52:46-00:52:55:
      John Watson (to Sherlock Holmes): It's Lestrade. Says they're all coming over here right now. Queuing up to slap on the handcuffs, every single officer you ever made feel like a tit. Which is a lot of people.
  4. (Britain, slang, derogatory) A police officer; a "tithead".
Derived terms
Related terms
  • titty, tittie
Translations

Etymology 2

Perhaps imitative of light tap. Compare earlier tip for tap (blow for blow), from tip + tap; compare also dialectal tint for tant.

Noun

tit (plural tits)

  1. (archaic) A light blow or hit (now usually in the phrase tit for tat).

Verb

tit (third-person singular simple present tits, present participle titting, simple past and past participle titted)

  1. (transitive or intransitive, obsolete) To strike lightly, tap, pat.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To taunt, to reproach.

Etymology 3

Probably of North Germanic/Scandinavian origin; found earliest in titling and titmouse; compare Faroese títlingur, dialectal Norwegian titling (small stockfish), which could ultimately be from a base alluding to diminutive size; compare the first element of titbit.

Wikispecies

Noun

tit (plural tits)

  1. A chickadee; a small passerine bird of the genus Parus or the family Paridae, common in the Northern Hemisphere.
  2. Any of various other small passerine birds.
  3. (archaic) A small horse; a nag.
  4. (archaic) A young girl, later especially a minx, hussy.
  5. A morsel; a bit.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • ITT, TTI, itt

Catalan

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈtit/

Noun

tit m (plural tits)

  1. (childish) chick
    Synonym: pollet

Further reading

  • “tit” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.
  • “tit” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “tit” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Chuukese

Noun

tit

  1. fence, wall
  2. pen (enclosure)

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tit/, [ˈtˢid̥]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse títt (often), the neuter form of the adjective tíðr (frequent), from Proto-Germanic *tīdijaz. Derived from the noun *tīdiz (time).

Adverb

tit (comparative tiere, superlative tiest)

  1. often
  2. frequently
Synonyms
  • ofte
  • hyppigt
  • mange gange

Etymology 2

Verbal noun to titte (peep, peek).

Noun

tit n (singular definite tittet, plural indefinite tit)

  1. glimpse
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

tit

  1. imperative of titte

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse þið.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tiːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt

Pronoun

tit

  1. you (plural)
    Synonym: tykur (Suðuroy)

Declension


Irish

Alternative forms

  • tuit

Etymology

From Old Irish do·tuit (falls, verb).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʲɪtʲ/

Verb

tit (present analytic titeann, future analytic titfidh, verbal noun titim, past participle tite)

  1. (intransitive) fall
    1. drop down
    2. collapse
    3. descend
    4. decline
    5. come down to lower level
    6. abate
    7. droop, deteriorate
    8. be overthrown, be killed
    9. lose position

Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • "tit" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 do·tuit”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “tit” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “tit” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Kavalan

Noun

tit

  1. kingfisher

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tit/

Noun

tit

  1. talk

Verb

tit

  1. to talk

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[4], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Pipil

Etymology

From Proto-Nahuan *tlai(h)-. Compare Classical Nahuatl tletl (fire)

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /tiːt/

Noun

tīt

  1. fire

Pnar

Etymology

From Proto-Khasian *tit, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *pt₁is. Cognate with Khasi tit, Riang [Sak] tis¹, Khmu [Cuang] tih, Khmer ផ្សិត (phsət).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tit/

Noun

tit

  1. mushroom

Slavomolisano

Etymology

From Ikavian Serbo-Croatian htiti; compare Ijekavian htjeti, Ekavian hteti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tît/

Verb

tit impf

  1. to want

References

  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale)., pp. 413–414

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English teeth.

Noun

tit

  1. tooth

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English teeth.

Noun

tit

  1. tooth

Source: wiktionary.org
  • pertaining to structural material.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)