Use in Scrabble Dictionary

What does use mean? Is use a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is use worth? use how many points in Words With Friends? What does use mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for use

See how to calculate how many points for use.

Is use a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word use is a Scrabble US word. The word use is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

U1S1E1

Is use a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word use is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

U1S1E1

Is use a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word use is a Words With Friends word. The word use is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

U2S1E1

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Valid words made from Use

You can make 4 words from 'use' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'use'

SUE 3USE 3

2 letters words from 'use'

ES 2US 2

All 3 letters words made out of use

use sue ues eus seu esu

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word use. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in use.

Definitions and meaning of use

use

Etymology

Noun from Middle English use, from Old French us, from Latin ūsus (use, custom, skill, habit), from past participle stem of ūtor (use). Displaced native Middle English note (use) (See note) from Old English notu, and Middle English nutte (use) from Old English nytt.

Verb from Middle English usen, from Old French user (use, employ, practice), from Vulgar Latin *usare (use), frequentative form of past participle stem of Latin uti (to use). Displaced native Middle English noten, nutten (to use) (from Old English notian, nēotan, nyttian) and Middle English brouken, bruken (to use, enjoy) (from Old English brūcan).

Pronunciation

Noun
  • enPR: yo͞os, IPA(key): /juːs/
  • Rhymes: -uːs
Verb
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: yo͞oz, IPA(key): /juːz/
  • (General American) enPR: yo͞oz, IPA(key): /juz/
Rhymes: -uːz
Homophones: ewes, yews, yous, youse

Noun

use (countable and uncountable, plural uses)

  1. The act of using.
  2. (uncountable) The act of consuming alcohol or narcotics.
  3. (uncountable, followed by "of") Usefulness, benefit.
    • (Can we date this quote by Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      God made two great lights, great for their use / To man.
  4. A function; a purpose for which something may be employed.
  5. Occasion or need to employ; necessity.
    I have no further use for these textbooks.
  6. (obsolete, rare) Interest for lent money; premium paid for the use of something; usury.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 1
      DON PEDRO. Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick.
      BEATRICE. Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for a single one: [...]
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Thou art more obliged to pay duty and tribute, use and principal, to him.
  7. (archaic) Continued or repeated practice; usage; habit.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Let later age that noble use envy.
  8. (obsolete) Common occurrence; ordinary experience.
  9. (religion) The special form of ritual adopted for use in any diocese.
    the Sarum, or Canterbury, use; the Hereford use; the York use; the Roman use; etc.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Book of Common Prayer
      From henceforth all the whole realm shall have but one use.
  10. (forging) A slab of iron welded to the side of a forging, such as a shaft, near the end, and afterward drawn down, by hammering, so as to lengthen the forging.

Synonyms

  • (act of using): employment, usage, note, nait
  • (usefulness): benefit, good, point, usefulness, utility, note, nait

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • no use
  • what’s the use

Translations

Verb

use (third-person singular simple present uses, present participle using, simple past and past participle used)

  1. To utilize or employ.
    1. (transitive) To employ; to apply; to utilize.
    2. (transitive, often with up) To expend; to consume by employing.
    3. (transitive) To exploit.
    4. (transitive) To consume (alcohol, drugs, etc), especially regularly.
      He uses cocaine. I have never used drugs.
    5. (intransitive) To consume a previously specified substance, especially a drug to which one is addicted.
    6. (transitive, with auxiliary "could") To benefit from; to be able to employ or stand.
  2. To accustom; to habituate. (Now common only in participial form. Uses the same pronunciation as the noun; see usage notes.)
    (still common)
    (now rare)
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Thou with thy compeers, / Used to the yoke, draw'st his triumphant wheels.
    1. (reflexive, obsolete, with "to") To become accustomed, to accustom oneself.
      • 1714, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees, London: T. Ostell, 1806, Sixth Dialogue, p. 466,[1]
        It is not without some difficulty, that a man born in society can form an idea of such savages, and their condition; and unless he has used himself to abstract thinking, he can hardly represent to himself such a state of simplicity, in which man can have so few desires, and no appetites roving beyond the immediate call of untaught nature []
      • 1742, Samuel Richardson, Pamela, London: S. Richardson, 4th edition, Volume 3, Letter 12, p. 53,[2]
        So that reading constantly, and thus using yourself to write, and enjoying besides the Benefit of a good Memory, every thing you heard or read, became your own []
      • 1769, John Leland, Discourses on Various Subjects, London: W. Johnston and J. Dodsley, Volume 1, Discourse 16, p. 311,[3]
        [] we must be constant and faithful to our Words and Promises, and use ourselves to be so even in smaller Matters []
      • 1876, George Eliot, Daniel Deronda, Book 3, Chapter 24,[4]
        The family troubles, she thought, were easier for every one than for her—even for poor dear mamma, because she had always used herself to not enjoying.
  3. (intransitive, now rare, literary, except in past tense) To habitually do; to be wont to do. (Now chiefly in past-tense forms; see used to.)
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, 1 Peter 4:9,[5]
      Use hospitality one to another without grudging.
    • 1764, Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto, II:
      I do not use to let my wife be acquainted with the secret affairs of my state; they are not within a woman's province.
  4. (dated) To behave toward; to act with regard to; to treat.
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act II, Scene 6,[6]
      See who it is: and, now the battle’s ended,
      If friend or foe, let him be gently used.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Luke 6:28,[7]
      Bless them that curse you, and pray for them which despitefully use you.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem in IV Books, to which is added Samson Agonistes, London: John Starkey, p. 58,[8]
      If in my flower of youth and strength, when all men / Lov’d, honour’d, fear’d me, thou alone could hate me / Thy Husband, slight me, sell me, forgo me; / How wouldst thou use me now, blind, and thereby / Deceivable []
    • 1713, Joseph Addison, Cato: A Tragedy, London: J. Tonson, Act I, Scene 2, p. 6,[9]
      Cato has used me Ill: He has refused / His Daughter Marcia to my ardent Vows.
    • , Book 8, Chapter 3,
      “I hope,” said Jones, “you don’t intend to leave me in this condition.” “Indeed but I shall,” said the other. “Then,” said Jones, “you have used me rascally, and I will not pay you a farthing.”
  5. (reflexive, obsolete) To behave, act, comport oneself.
    • 1551, Thomas More, Utopia, London: B. Alsop & T. Fawcet, 1639, “Of Bond-men, Sicke persons, Wedlocke, and divers other matters,” page 231,[10]
      They live together lovingly: For no Magistrate is either haughty or fearefull. Fathers they be called, and like fathers they use themselves.
    • c. 1558, George Cavendish, The Life and Death of Thomas Wolsey, cardinal, edited by Grace H. M. Simpson, London: R. & T. Washbourne, 1901, page 57,[11]
      I pray to God that this may be a sufficient admonition unto thee to use thyself more wisely hereafter, for assure thyself that if thou dost not amend thy prodigality, thou wilt be the last Earl of our house.

Usage notes

  • When meaning "accustom, habituate" or "habitually do (or employ)", the verb use is pronounced /juːs/ (like the noun use); these senses and hence this pronunciation is now found chiefly in the past tense or as a past participle (/juːst/), or in the (past) negative form did not use (as in I did not use to like her or the dragoons did not use [habituate, become habituated] to the Russian cold). In all other senses, it is pronounced /juːz/ (past tense/participle /juːzd/).
  • See also the usage notes at used to (and use to) for more, especially on the use of this sense in interrogatives, negatives, and the past tense.

Synonyms

  • (employ, apply, utilize): engage, utilise
  • (exploit): take advantage of

Derived terms

Translations

References

  • use in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • SEU, Sue, UEs, sue, ues

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • ussa, usse, uuse

Etymology

Contraction of us + hii.

Pronunciation

  • (Zurich) IPA(key): /ˈuzə/

Adverb

use

  1. out
    • 1903, Robert Walser, Der Teich:
      Aber i muess pressiere, daß i bald fertig wirde. Nächär chani use go spiele.
      But I need to hurry so I can finish soon. Then I can go out and play.

Asturian

Verb

use

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of usar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of usar

Chuukese

Etymology

u- +‎ -se

Pronoun

use

  1. I do not

Adjective

use

  1. I am not
  2. I was not

Related terms



French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /yz/

Verb

use

  1. first-person singular present indicative of user
  2. third-person singular present indicative of user
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of user
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of user
  5. second-person singular imperative of user

Anagrams

  • eus, sue, sué

Latin

Participle

ūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of ūsus

Manx

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

use m (genitive singular use, plural useyn)

  1. (finance) interest; usury

Derived terms


Portuguese

Verb

use

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of usar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of usar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of usar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of usar

Spanish

Verb

use

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of usar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of usar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of usar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of usar.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • USANCE, a generally accepted practice or procedure.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)