Ut in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does ut mean? Is ut a Scrabble word?

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Is ut a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word ut is a Scrabble US word. The word ut is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

U1T1

Is ut a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word ut is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

U1T1

Is ut a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word ut is a Words With Friends word. The word ut is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

U2T1

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You can make 1 words from 'ut' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


2 letters words from 'ut'

UT 2 

Definitions and meaning of ut

ut

Etymology

From Latin ut, from the first word of Ut queant laxis, the medieval hymn which solfège was based on because its lines started on each note of the scale successively.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʌt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Noun

ut (plural uts)

  1. (music, dated) Syllable (formerly) used in solfège to represent the first note of a major scale.

Usage notes

  • In solfège, ut has been replaced by do.

Derived terms

  • gamut

Translations

Anagrams

  • -tu-, TU, Tu,

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin ut, from the first word of Ut queant laxis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈut/

Noun

ut m (plural uts)

  1. (music, dated) ut

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /yt/

Noun

ut m (plural ut)

  1. (music) ut (do) the note 'C'.

Further reading

  • “ut” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tu

Gothic

Romanization

ūt

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐍄

Latin

Alternative forms

  • utī
  • utei (old form)

Etymology

Some supposed ut < uti < utī < utei < *utai < *uta + i, with this *uta corresponding to ita (and utinam < *utanam). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis, *kʷos and *só. See ubi for the loss of c.

Jussive and optative sentences were often followed by some adverbial ut(i), originally meaning "in some way" (sometimes interchangeable with instrumental qui (by some means)). Ut becoming habitual, lost its full meaning and was weakened to the conjunction ut, which now fell to govern the subjunctive mood. This was the epitome of the evolution of subordinate clauses in Latin.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ut/, [ʊt̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ut/, [ut̪]

Adverb

ut (not comparable)

  1. (interrogative) how? in what way?
    • Ut vales?
      How do you fare?
  2. (relative) as
    • Faciam ut voles.
      I shall do as you want.

Conjunction

ut (followed by the subjunctive)

  1. that, so that, to, in order to, in order that (introduces the subject or object clause of a verb)
    • Spero ut pacem habeant semper.
      I hope that they may always have peace.
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 2:4
      tollensque illud portavit ad domum suam occulte ut dum sol occubuisset caute sepeliret eum
      And taking it up carried it privately to his house, that after the sun was down, he might bury him cautiously.
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 3:25
      et missus est angelus Domini sanctus Rafahel ut curaret ambos quorum uno tempore fuerat oratio in conspectu Domini recitata
      And the holy angel of the Lord, Raphael was sent to heal them both, whose prayers at one time were rehearsed in the sight of the Lord.
  2. although

Conjunction

ut (followed by the indicative)

  1. as, just as
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.

Usage notes

Often coupled with ita

  1. Such that "ita x, ut y" = "so/thus x, as y"

Derived terms

  • prout
  • sīcut
  • utinam
  • utique
  • utut
  • velut

Related terms

References

  • ut in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ut in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ut in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Marshallese

Alternative forms

  • wūt

Derived terms

  • utut
  • wūtwūt

Pronunciation

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [wutˠ]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /witˠ/
  • Bender phonemes: {wit}

Noun

ut

  1. general term for hedge plant flower
  2. a flower
  3. a tree with flowers
  4. a wreath of flowers

References

  • Marshallese–English Online Dictionary

Meriam

Noun

ut

  1. sleep

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

Adverb

ut

  1. out (direction)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • ute

Interjection

ut

  1. get out!

References

  • “ut” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt. Akin to English out.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʉːt/

Adverb

ut

  1. out (direction)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • ute

Interjection

ut

  1. get out!

References

  • “ut” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Adverb

ūt

  1. out

References

  • Altniederfränkischer Psalm 18

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ūt, from Proto-Indo-European *úd. Cognate with Old Saxon ūt (Dutch uit), Old High German ūz (German aus), Old Norse út (Swedish ut), Gothic 𐌿𐍄 (ut).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /uːt/

Adverb

ūt

  1. out
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "The Nativity of St. Clement the Martyr"
  2. outside, outdoors

Derived terms

  • ūte
  • ūtfūs

Descendants

  • Middle English: ut, out
    • English: out
      • German: out, outen
    • Scots: out, oot

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ūt.

Adverb

ūt

  1. out

Preposition

ūt

  1. out of

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: ût
    • German Low German: uut
    • Low German: ut

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʉːt/
  • Rhymes: -ʉːt

Adverb

ut (not comparable)

  1. out (direction)

Interjection

ut

  1. get out!

Postposition

ut

  1. from a certain point within a timespan until the end of that timespan is passed (and further in time)

Usage notes

  • året ut
    Until the end of this year (and possibly further)
  • Detta resultat stod sig matchen ut
    This result lasted for the rest of the game,
    This result lasted until the game was over (and further, is still valid unless something else is known)

See also

  • ute

Anagrams

  • tu

Turkish

Alternative forms

  • ud

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic عُود(ʿūd).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ut/

Noun

ut (definite accusative udu, plural utlar)

  1. oud (a type of lute)

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • the lending of money at an exorbitant interest rate.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)