Win in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does win mean? Is win a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is win worth? win how many points in Words With Friends? What does win mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for win

See how to calculate how many points for win.

Is win a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word win is a Scrabble US word. The word win is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

W4I1N1

Is win a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word win is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

W4I1N1

Is win a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word win is a Words With Friends word. The word win is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

W4I1N2

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Valid words made from Win

You can make 2 words from 'win' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'win'

WIN 6 

2 letters words from 'win'

IN 2 

All 3 letters words made out of win

win iwn wni nwi inw niw

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word win. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in win.

Definitions and meaning of win

win

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophones: wynn, Nguyen, winne

Etymology 1

From Middle English winnen, from Old English winnan (to labour, swink, toil, trouble oneself; resist, oppose, contradict; fight, strive, struggle, rage; endure) (compare Old English ġewinnan (conquer, obtain, gain; endure, bear, suffer; be ill)), from Proto-Germanic *winnaną (to swink, labour, win, gain, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love). Cognate with Low German winnen, Dutch winnen, German gewinnen, Norwegian Bokmål vinne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish vinna.

Verb

win (third-person singular simple present wins, present participle winning, simple past and past participle won or (obsolete) wan)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To conquer, defeat.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book IV:
      For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one knyȝt at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To reach some destination or object, despite difficulty or toil (now usually intransitive, with preposition or locative adverb).
    • c. 17th century, unknown author, The Baron of Brackley (traditional folk song)
      I well may gang out, love, but I'll never win home.
  3. (transitive) To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc.).
  4. (transitive) To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.
  5. (transitive) To obtain (someone) by wooing; to make an ally or friend of (frequently with over).
    • 1589, Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia
      Thy virtue won me; with virtue preserve me.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act V, Scene 3
      She is a woman; therefore to be won.
  6. (intransitive) To achieve victory.
  7. (intransitive) To have power, coercion or control.
  8. (transitive) To obtain (something desired).
  9. (transitive) To cause a victory for someone.
  10. (transitive, mining) To extract (ore, coal, etc.).
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English winn, winne, from Old English winn (toil, labor, trouble, hardship; profit, gain; conflict, strife, war), from Proto-Germanic *winną (labour, struggle, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, desire, wish, love). Cognate with German Gewinn (profit, gain), Dutch gewin (profit, gain).

Noun

win (plural wins)

  1. An individual victory.
    Antonym: loss
    Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.
  2. (slang) A feat carried out successfully; a victorious achievement.
    Antonym: fail
  3. (obsolete) Gain; profit; income.
  4. (obsolete) Wealth; goods owned.
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English wynne, winne, wunne, from Old English wynn (joy, rapture, pleasure, delight, gladness), from Proto-West Germanic *wunnju, from Proto-Germanic *wunjō (joy, delight, pleasure, lust), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love).

Cognate with German Wonne (bliss, joy, delight), archaic Dutch wonne (joy), Danish ynde (grace), Icelandic yndi (delight).

Noun

win (plural wins)

  1. (Scotland) Pleasure; joy; delight.
Derived terms
  • worldly win

Etymology 4

From wind.

Verb

win

  1. (transitive, Scotland) To dry by exposure to the wind.

References


Chuukese

Etymology

Borrowed from English win.

Noun

win

  1. win
  2. victory
  3. prize

Verb

win

  1. to win

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • IPA(key): /ʋɪn/

Verb

win

  1. first-person singular present indicative of winnen
  2. imperative of winnen

Kis

Noun

win

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

win (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of wynne (happiness)

Etymology 2

From Old English winn, from Proto-West Germanic *winnan, from Proto-Germanic *winną, *winnaną; akin to winnen. Reinforced by earlier iwin, from Old English ġewinn.

Alternative forms

  • winn, winne, wynne, wunne

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /win/

Noun

win (uncountable)

  1. benefit, gain, profit
  2. (Late Middle English) wealth, riches
  3. (Early Middle English) discord, conflict, turmoil
  4. (Early Middle English, rare) exertion, work
Descendants
  • English: win
References
  • “win, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 3

Verb

win

  1. Alternative form of winnen (to win)

Etymology 4

Noun

win

  1. Alternative form of vine (grapevine)

North Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɪn/

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian wind, from Proto-Germanic *windaz.

Noun

win m

  1. (Mooring) wind

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun

win m

  1. (Mooring) wine

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun

wīn m

  1. wine

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: wijn
    • Dutch: wijn
      • Afrikaans: wyn
    • Limburgish: wien

Further reading

  • “wīn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek[2], 2012

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn from Latin vīnum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiːn/
  • Homophone: wynn

Noun

wīn n

  1. wine

Declension

Derived terms

  • æppelwīn
  • wīntrēow

Descendants

  • Middle English: wyn, win, wine, wyne, wijn, vine, vyn, vyne, wyen, weyn, wynne
    • English: wine (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: wyne

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vʲin/

Noun

win f

  1. genitive plural of wina

Noun

win n

  1. genitive plural of wino

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English wind.

Noun

win

  1. wind

Related terms

  • winim

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English wind.

Noun

win

  1. wind

Derived terms

  • big win

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiːn/

Noun

win

  1. Soft mutation of gwin.

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • WIMPLE, to wrap in a wimple.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)