Wis in Scrabble Dictionary

What does wis mean? Is wis a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is wis worth? wis how many points in Words With Friends? What does wis mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for wis

See how to calculate how many points for wis.

Is wis a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word wis is a Scrabble US word. The word wis is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

W4I1S1

Is wis a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word wis is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

W4I1S1

Is wis a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word wis is a Words With Friends word. The word wis is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

W4I1S1

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Valid words made from Wis

You can make 3 words from 'wis' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'wis'

WIS 6 

2 letters words from 'wis'

IS 2SI 2

All 3 letters words made out of wis

wis iws wsi swi isw siw

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word wis. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in wis.

Definitions and meaning of wis

wis

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /waɪs/
  • Rhymes: -aɪs

Alternative forms

  • wiss, ywis, iwis

Etymology 1

From Middle English wis (certain, sure), from an aphetic form of Middle English iwis, ywis (certain, sure) (from Old English ġewiss (certain, sure)), or of North Germanic origin, akin to Icelandic viss (certain). Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *gawissaz. More at iwis.

Adverb

wis (comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certainly, surely
    • 1884, Charlotte Mary Yonge, The armourer's prentices:
      So I wis would the Dragon under him [...]
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Really, truly
  3. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Indeed
    • (Can we date this quote by Chaucer and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
    As wis God helpe me.

Adjective

wis (comparative more wis, superlative most wis)

  1. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Certain
  2. (rare, obsolete or dialectal) Sure
    He was wis on his word.
    I am wis that it will happen.

Derived terms

  • wisly

Etymology 2

From an incorrect division, mistaking iwis (certain) for I wis (I know). See ywis for more information. The German verb wissen appears similar, but in fact corresponds etymologically to the English verb wit; both of those verbs ultimately descend from the same Proto-Indo-European root as this one.

Verb

wis (third-person singular simple present wis, present participle -, simple past -, past participle wist or wissed)

  1. (obsolete or archaic) To know.
    • 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene ix[1]:
      "The fire seven times tried this:
      Seven times tried that judgement is,
      That did never choose amiss.
      Some there be that shadows kiss:
      Such have but a shadow's bliss.
      There be fools alive, I wis,
      Silver'd o'er; and so was this.
      I will ever be your head:
      So be gone: you are sped."
  2. (obsolete or archaic) To think, suppose.
    • (Can we date this quote by R. Browning and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
    Howe'er you wis.
  3. (obsolete or archaic) To imagine, ween; to deem.
    • (Can we date this quote by Coleridge and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
    Nor do I know how long it is (For I have lain entranced, I wis).

Anagrams

  • WSI

Afrikaans

Verb

wis

  1. preterite of weet; knew

Chuukese

Noun

wis

  1. duty, responsibility

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1

Adjective

wis (not comparable)

  1. sure, certain
    een wisse dood — a certain death
Inflection

Etymology 2

Noun

wis f or m (plural wissen, diminutive wisje n)

  1. twig
  2. bundle, bunch
  3. short for wisdoek (dishcloth)

Etymology 3

Verb

wis

  1. first-person singular present indicative of wissen
  2. imperative of wissen

Gothic

Romanization

wis

  1. Romanization of 𐍅𐌹𐍃

Javanese

Adverb

wis

  1. already

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to see, to know).

Adjective

wīs

  1. wise

Inflection


Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: wijs

Further reading

  • “wīs”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ƿīswynn spelling

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiːs/

Adjective

wīs

  1. wise

Declension

Derived terms

  • andwīs
  • stæfwīs
  • unwīs
  • wīslīċe
  • wīsnes

Descendants

  • Middle English: wis, wys
    • Scots: wis, wise
    • English: wise
      • English: wizard

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective

wīs

  1. wise

Descendants

  • Middle High German: wīse
    • German: weise
  • Old High German: wīsi

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos (knowledgeable), an extension of *weyd- (to see, to know). Akin to Old English wīs, Old High German wīs and Old Norse víss.

Adjective

wīs

  1. wise

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: wīs
    • Low German:
      • German Low German: wies
      • Westphalian:
        Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: wuise, wuis
        Sauerländisch: weyse, wüse, wīse, wuise
        Westmünsterländisch: wiese
    • Plautdietsch: weis

Scots

Etymology

Compare West Frisian "wie".

Verb

wis

  1. simple past tense of be

Usage notes

Use wis with singular pronouns & plural nouns, otherwise use wis, war or wir with plural pronouns.

See also

  • wir

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

wis

  1. certain, sure
  2. true
  3. safe, trustworthy

Inflection

Derived terms

  • jawis

Further reading

  • “wis (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Source: wiktionary.org
  • (Scots) the devil, a hobgoblin, anything frightening.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)