Col in Scrabble Dictionary

What does col mean? Is col a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is col worth? col how many points in Words With Friends? What does col mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for col

See how to calculate how many points for col.

Is col a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word col is a Scrabble US word. The word col is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

C3O1L1

Is col a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word col is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

C3O1L1

Is col a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word col is a Words With Friends word. The word col is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1L2

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Valid words made from Col

You can make 2 words from 'col' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'col'

COL 5 

2 letters words from 'col'

LO 2 

All 3 letters words made out of col

col ocl clo lco olc loc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word col. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in col.

Definitions and meaning of col

col

Etymology

Borrowed from French col, from Latin collum (neck). Doublet of collum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɒl/

Noun

col (plural cols)

  1. (geography) A dip on a mountain ridge between two peaks.
    Coordinate terms: bealach, mountain pass, pass, saddle, hause
  2. (meteorology) A pressure region between two anticyclones and two low-pressure regions.

Translations

Further reading

  • col on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • col (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • mountain pass on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • CLO, Clo, LOC, LoC, OCL, OLC, loc, loc.

Asturian

Etymology

From a contraction of the preposition con (with) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction

col m (feminine cola, neuter colo, masculine plural colos, feminine plural coles)

  1. with the

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin caulis, caulem (stalk, stem), from Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem of a plant).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkɔl/

Noun

col f (plural cols)

  1. cabbage

Derived terms

  • colrave
  • col de Brussel·les

Further reading

  • “col” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “col” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “col” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “col” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *cu illu < Latin eccum illum. Compare Italian quello, Romanian acel, Old French cil, Spanish aquel.

Pronoun

col

  1. that

Dutch

Etymology 1

From French col (collar), from Latin collum (neck).

Noun

col m (plural cols, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (clothing) collar
Synonyms
  • kraag

Etymology 2

Noun

col m (plural collen, diminutive colletje n)

  1. (informal, Belgium) (sports) mountain pass
Synonyms
  • bergpas

Etymology 3

From French colle

Noun

col f (uncountable)

  1. (informal, Belgium) glue
Synonyms
  • lijm

French

Etymology

From Old French col, from Latin collum (neck). Doublet of cou.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔl/
  • Homophones: colle, collent, colles, cols

Noun

col m (plural cols)

  1. collar
  2. col
  3. neck (now especially of objects, vases etc.)

Derived terms

  • col de l'utérus

Related terms

  • cou
  • collier

Further reading

  • “col” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Alternative forms

  • coia, couva

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese col (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from an older unattested *coule, from Latin caulis. Cognate with Portuguese couve and Spanish col.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɔl/

Noun

col f (plural coles)

  1. collard; wild mustard, wild cabbage; kale; Brassica oleracea var. acephala
    Synonyms: coella, verza

Derived terms

  • coella
  • coíña
  • coíñeiro

Related terms

  • coliflor

References

  • “col” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “coles” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “couues” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “col” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “col” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “col” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from German Zoll.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈt͡sol]
  • Hyphenation: col
  • Rhymes: -ol

Noun

col (plural colok)

  1. inch

Declension

Derived terms

  • colos

References


Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kɔl̪ˠ]

Etymology

From Old Irish col, from Proto-Celtic *kulom.

Noun

col m (genitive singular coil, nominative plural colanna)

  1. prohibition
  2. sin, lust
  3. violation
  4. dislike
  5. incest
    Synonyms: ciorrú coil, corbadh
  6. relation, relationship
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

col m (genitive singular coil, nominative plural coil)

  1. (geography) col
Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • "col" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “col” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “col” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian

Contraction

col

  1. contraction of con il; with the

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French col, from Latin collum.

Noun

col m (plural cols)

  1. (anatomy) the neck

Descendants

  • French: cou, col

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *kōluz, *kōlaz. Cognate with Old High German kuoli.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːl/

Adjective

cōl (comparative cōlra, superlative cōlost)

  1. cool (not hot or warm)
Declension
Descendants
  • Middle English: col, coul, cool
    • Scots: cule, cuill, kuil
    • English: cool

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *kulą. Cognate with Old Frisian kole, Old High German kolo, Old Norse kol.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kol/

Noun

col n (nominative plural colu)

  1. coal
Declension
Descendants
  • Middle English: cole
    • English: coal

Old French

Etymology

From Latin collum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔl

Noun

col m (oblique plural cous or cox or cols, nominative singular cous or cox or cols, nominative plural col)

  1. (anatomy) neck

Related terms

  • coler

Descendants

  • Middle French: col
    • French: cou, col
  • Norman: co
  • Walloon:

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *kulom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkol/

Noun

col n (genitive cuil)

  1. sin, violation

Inflection

Descendants

  • Irish: col
  • Scottish Gaelic: col (incest)

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “col”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish col (sin).

Noun

col m (genitive singular cola, plural colan)

  1. incest

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

Borrowed from German Zoll.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tsôːl/

Noun

cȏl m (Cyrillic spelling цо̑л)

  1. inch

Declension

Related terms

  • ȉnč, pȁlac

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin caulis, caulem (stalk, stem), from Ancient Greek καυλός (kaulós, stem of a plant). Cognate with English cole and chou.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkol/
  • Rhymes: -ol

Noun

col f (plural coles)

  1. cabbage
    Synonyms: berza, repollo

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Taos: kùli’ína

Related terms

  • brécol

Tocharian B

Adjective

col

  1. wild

Vilamovian

Pronunciation

Noun

cōl m (plural cōln)

  1. inch (unit of measure)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a pass in a mountain range.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)