Cum in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does cum mean? Is cum a Scrabble word?

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Is cum a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cum is a Scrabble US word. The word cum is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

C3U1M3

Is cum a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cum is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

C3U1M3

Is cum a Words With Friends word?

The word cum is NOT a Words With Friends word.

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Valid words made from Cum

You can make 3 words from 'cum' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'cum'

CUM 7 

2 letters words from 'cum'

MU 4UM 4

All 3 letters words made out of cum

cum ucm cmu mcu umc muc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cum. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cum.

Definitions and meaning of cum

cum

Etymology 1

From Latin cum (with).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /kʌm/, /kəm/, /kʊm/, [kʰʌm], [kʰʊm], enPR: kŭm
  • Rhymes: -ʌm, -ʊm

Preposition

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.

Conjunction

cum

  1. Used in indicating a thing with two or more roles, functions, or natures, or a thing that has changed from one to another.
Quotations
  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:cum.
Translations

Etymology 2

Variant of come, attested (in the basic sense "come, move from further to nearer, arrive") since Old English.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /kʌm/, /kəm/, [kʰʌm], enPR: kŭm
  • Rhymes: -ʌm
  • Homophone: come

Noun

cum (uncountable)

  1. (slang, vulgar) Semen.
  2. (slang, vulgar) Female ejaculatory discharge.
  3. (slang, vulgar) An ejaculation.
Synonyms
  • (Semen): spunk (chiefly UK), spooge (US), jiz, jizz, jizzum, jism, gism, nut, junk
  • see also Thesaurus:semen
Derived terms
  • precum
  • cumslut, cumwhore, cumdump, cumguzzler, cumrag, cumhole, cumdumpster
  • cumshot, cumload, cumwad
  • cumskin
Translations

Verb

cum (third-person singular simple present cums, present participle cumming, simple past came or cummed, past participle come or cum or (nonstandard) cummed)

  1. (slang) To have an orgasm, to feel the sensation of an orgasm.
    Synonym: climax
  2. (slang) To ejaculate.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:ejaculate
  3. (dialectal or nonstandard) Alternative form of come (move from further to nearer; arrive)
    • 1882, William Makepeace Thayer, From Log-Cabin to White House, page 162:
      “Where'd he cum from?” the bowman inquired. “That's what we'd like ter know, yer see; where he cum from, and how he happen'd to cum,” responded the steersman. “But he's a jolly good feller, strong as a lion, []
Translations

Usage notes

Many style guides and editors recommend the spelling come for verb uses (to orgasm/to ejaculate) while strictly allowing the spelling cum for the noun (semen/female ejaculatory discharge). Both spellings are sometimes found in either the noun or verb sense, however. Others prefer to distinguish in formality, using come for any formal usage and cum only in slang, erotic or pornographic contexts.

Etymology 3

Adjective

cum (not comparable)

  1. Clipping of cumulative.

References

Anagrams

  • CMU, MCU, MUC, UMC

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • cumu

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quōmodo.

Adverb

cum

  1. how

Conjunction

cum

  1. how

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish cummaid (fashions, shapes, composes, determines; makes, creates, devises), from cummae (act of cutting, carving, hacking, destroying, butchering; act of shaping, fashioning, composing; shape, form, appearance) (compare modern cuma).

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Galway) IPA(key): /kuːmˠ/
  • (Mayo, Ulster) IPA(key): /kʊmˠ/

Verb

cum (present analytic cumann, future analytic cumfaidh, verbal noun cumadh, past participle cumtha) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. form, shape
  2. compose
  3. devise
  4. invent
  5. (textiles) make up; (with le) fit
    1. limit
    2. ration

Inflection

Mutation

Further reading

  • "cum" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “cummaid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “cum” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “cum” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latin

Alternative forms

  • (medieval, renaissance, early modern)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kum/, [kʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kum/
  • (Vulgar) IPA(key): /kum/, [kõ]

Etymology 1

From Old Latin com, from Proto-Italic *kom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along). Cognate with Proto-Germanic *ga- (co-), Proto-Slavic *sъ(n) (with), Proto-Germanic *hansō. More at hanse.

Preposition

cum (+ ablative)

  1. with, along with
  2. at (denoting a point in time with which an action coincides)
  3. -fold (with ordinal number)
Derived terms
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Old Latin quom, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷóm, accusative of *kʷos, *kʷis. Compare its feminine form quam (as in tum-tam).

Alternative forms

  • quum
  • (Old Latin) quom

Conjunction

cum (+ subjunctive)

  1. when
  2. because, since
  3. although
Usage notes
  • In the sense of when, if there is no causal link between the verb in the dependent clause and the verb in the main clause (sometimes called an inverted cum-clause, as the 'main action' of the sentence occurs in the dependent clause), the indicative is used rather than the subjunctive.
    per viam ambulābāmus cum pugnam vīdimus. [not *vīderīmus] — "We were walking through the street when we happened to witness a fight."
Coordinate terms
  • tum
Derived terms
  • quomque/ cumque
  • quondam
  • quoniam
  • umquam

References

  • (preposition) cum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • (conjunction) cum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • cum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.

Manx

Etymology 1

From Old Irish con·gaib. Cognate with Irish coinnigh and Scottish Gaelic cum.

Verb

cum (verbal noun cummal)

  1. grip, hold
  2. keep, arrest, retain
  3. contain
  4. live, inhabit
  5. celebrate

Etymology 2

From Middle Irish cummaid, a denominative verb from cumma, itself from Old Irish cummae (shape, form, appearance).

Verb

cum (verbal noun cummey)

  1. plan, devise
  2. fabricate, shape, mould
  3. indite

Mutation


Old French

Conjunction

cum

  1. Alternative form of conme

Old Irish

Alternative forms

  • ·cumai

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kuṽ/

Verb

·cum

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive prototonic of con·icc

Mutation


Portuguese

Etymology 1

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine article um (a)

Contraction

cum m (feminine cuma, masculine plural cuns, feminine plural cumas)

  1. with a

Etymology 2

Preposition

cum

  1. (Internet slang) Eye dialect spelling of com.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:cum.

Further reading

  • “cum” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Rohingya

Etymology

From Sanskrit चुम्ब (cumba).

Noun

cum

  1. kiss

Romanian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *quomo, from Latin quōmodo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [kum]

Adverb

cum

  1. how

Conjunction

cum

  1. how
  2. as, since, because

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʌm/

Verb

cum

  1. to come

Scottish Gaelic

Alternative forms

  • cùm

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰuːm/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish con·gaib. Cognate with Irish coinnigh and Manx cum.

Verb

cum (past chum, future cumaidh, verbal noun cumail, past participle cumta)

  1. keep, hold
  2. keep, continue
Derived terms
  • cum ri
  • cum suas ri

Etymology 2

From Old Irish cummaid (to fashion, makes), from cummae (act of cutting, shaping), verbal noun of con·ben.

Verb

cum (past chum, future cumaidh, verbal noun cumadh, past participle cumta)

  1. shape, form

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • to ejaculate sperm.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)