Cog in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does cog mean? Is cog a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is cog worth? cog how many points in Words With Friends? What does cog mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for cog

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Is cog a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cog is a Scrabble US word. The word cog is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

C3O1G2

Is cog a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cog is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

C3O1G2

Is cog a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word cog is a Words With Friends word. The word cog is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1G3

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Valid words made from Cog

You can make 2 words from 'cog' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'cog'

COG 6 

2 letters words from 'cog'

GO 3 

All 3 letters words made out of cog

cog ocg cgo gco ogc goc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cog. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cog.

Definitions and meaning of cog

cog

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: kŏg, IPA(key): /kɒɡ/
  • (General American) enPR: kŏg, kôg, IPA(key): /kɑɡ/, /kɔɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡ, -ɔːɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English cogge, from Old Norse [Term?] (compare Norwegian kugg (cog), Swedish kugg, kugge (cog, tooth)), from Proto-Germanic *kuggō (compare Dutch kogge (cogboat), German Kock), from Proto-Indo-European *gugā (hump, ball) (compare Lithuanian gugà (pommel, hump, hill)), from *gēw- (to bend, arch).

The meaning of “cog” in carpentry derives from association with a tooth on a cogwheel.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A tooth on a gear.
  2. A gear; a cogwheel.
  3. An unimportant individual in a greater system.
    • 1976, Norman Denny (English translation), Victor Hugo (original French), Les Misérables
      ‘There are twenty-five of us, but they don’t reckon I’m worth anything. I’m just a cog in the machine.’
    • 1988, David Mamet, Speed-the-Plow
      Your boss tells you “take initiative,” you best guess right—and you do, then you get no credit. Day-in, … smiling, smiling, just a cog.
  4. (carpentry) A projection or tenon at the end of a beam designed to fit into a matching opening of another piece of wood to form a joint.
  5. (mining) One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.
Derived terms
  • cog joint
Translations

Verb

cog (third-person singular simple present cogs, present participle cogging, simple past and past participle cogged)

  1. To furnish with a cog or cogs.

Etymology 2

From Middle English cogge, from Middle Dutch kogge, cogghe (modern kogge), from Proto-Germanic *kuggō (compare German Kock (cogboat), Norwegian kugg (cog (gear tooth))), from Proto-Indo-European *gugā (hump, ball) (compare Lithuanian gugà (pommel, hump, hill)), from *gēw- (to bend, arch). See etymology 1 above.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. (historical) A ship of burden, or war with a round, bulky hull.
Translations

Etymology 3

Uncertain origin. Both verb and noun appear first in 1532.

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A trick or deception; a falsehood.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of William Watson to this entry?)
Translations

Verb

cog (third-person singular simple present cogs, present participle cogging, simple past and past participle cogged)

  1. To load (a die) so that it can be used to cheat.
  2. To cheat; to play or gamble fraudulently.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift (debated), Molly Mog
      For guineas in other men's breeches, / Your gamesters will palm and will cog.
  3. To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.
  4. To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; to palm off.
    • October 3, 1718, John Dennis, letter to S. T. , Esq; On the Deceitfulness of Rumour
      Fustian tragedies [] have [] been cogg'd upon the town for Master-pieces.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Old English cogge.

Alternative forms

  • cogue

Noun

cog (plural cogs)

  1. A small fishing boat.
  2. Alternative form of cogue (wooden vessel for milk)

Anagrams

  • CGO

Irish

Etymology

Back-formation from cogadh (war).

Verb

cog (present analytic cogann, future analytic cogfaidh, verbal noun cogadh, past participle cogtha)

  1. (rare or archaic) to war, wage war

Conjugation

Mutation

Further reading

  • “cog” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 158.

Middle English

Etymology

From Old French cogue, itself from Middle Dutch kogge.

Noun

cog

  1. a ship of burden, or war with a round, bulky hull
    • As the Kynge was in his cog and lay in his caban, he felle in a slumberyng [].

Further reading

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

Back-formation from cogadh (war, fighting).

Verb

cog (past chog, future cogaidh, verbal noun cogadh, past participle cogte)

  1. fight

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːɡ/

Etymology 1

From Middle Welsh cog, from Proto-Brythonic *kokā, ultimately imitative, similar to Old High German (crow, jackdaw), Middle Low German (crow, jackdaw).

Noun

cog f (plural cogau)

  1. cuckoo

Usage notes

  • Cog is usually found preceded by the definite article, y gog.

Synonyms

  • (cuckoo): cwcw

Etymology 2

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin coquus

Noun

cog m (plural cogau or cygod)

  1. cook
    Synonym: cogydd

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cog”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to cheat at dice.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)