Cop in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does cop mean? Is cop a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is cop worth? cop how many points in Words With Friends? What does cop mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for cop

See how to calculate how many points for cop.

Is cop a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cop is a Scrabble US word. The word cop is worth 7 points in Scrabble:

C3O1P3

Is cop a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cop is a Scrabble UK word and has 7 points:

C3O1P3

Is cop a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word cop is a Words With Friends word. The word cop is worth 9 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1P4

Our tools

Valid words made from Cop

You can make 3 words from 'cop' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'cop'

COP 7 

2 letters words from 'cop'

OP 4PO 4

All 3 letters words made out of cop

cop ocp cpo pco opc poc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cop. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cop.

Definitions and meaning of cop

cop

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɒp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

From Middle English coppe, from Old English *coppe, as in ātorcoppe (spider, literally venom head), from Old English copp (top, summit, head), from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, round vessel, head), from Proto-Indo-European *gū- (to bend, curve). Cognate with Middle Dutch koppe, kobbe (spider). More at cobweb.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (obsolete) A spider.

Etymology 2

Uncertain. Perhaps from Old English copian (to plunder; pillage; steal); or possibly from Middle French caper (to capture), from Latin capiō (to seize, to grasp); or possibly from Dutch kapen (to seize, to hijack), from Old Frisian kāpia (to buy). Compare also Middle English copen (to buy), from Middle Dutch copen.

Verb

cop (third-person singular simple present cops, present participle copping, simple past and past participle copped)

  1. (transitive, formerly dialect, now informal) To obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take.
    • 1995, Norman L. Russell, ‎Doug Grad, Suicide Charlie: A Vietnam War Story (page 191)
      He sold me a bulging paper sack full of Cambodian Red for two dolla' MPC. A strange experience, copping from a kid, but it was righteous weed.
    • 2005, Martin Torgoff, Can't Find My Way Home, Simon & Schuster, page 10:
      Heroin appeared on the streets of our town for the first time, and Innie watched helplessly as his sixteen-year-old brother began taking the train to Harlem to cop smack.
  2. (transitive) To (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.
    When caught, he would often cop a vicious blow from his father
  3. (transitive, trainspotting, slang) To see and record a railway locomotive for the first time.
  4. (transitive) To steal.
  5. (transitive) To adopt.
    No need to cop a 'tude with me, junior.
  6. (transitive) To earn by bad behavior.
  7. (intransitive, usually with “to”, slang) to admit, especially to a crime.
    I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?
    Harold copped to being known as "Dirty Harry".
  8. (transitive, slang) For a pimp to recruit a prostitute into the stable.
    • 2009, Iceberg Slim, Pimp (page 90)
      I said, 'Tell your tricks to call you here.'
      She laid the bearskin and freaked the joint off with her lights and other crap. Except for the fake stars it was a fair mock-up of her pad where I had copped her.
    • 2011, Shaheem Hargrove, ‎Sharice Cuthrell, The Rise and Fall of a Ghetto Celebrity (page 55)
      The code was to call a pimp and tell him you have his hoe plus turn over her night trap but that was bull because the HOE was out of his stable months before I copped her.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Short for copper (police officer), itself from cop (one who cops) above, in reference to arresting criminals.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (slang, law enforcement) A police officer or prison guard.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:police officer
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English cop, coppe, from Old English cop, copp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, basin, round object), from Proto-Indo-European *gu-. Cognate with Dutch kop, German Kopf.

Noun

cop (plural cops)

  1. (crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.
  2. (obsolete) The top, summit, especially of a hill.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion
      Cop they use to call / The tops of many hills.
  3. (obsolete) The crown (of the head); also the head itself. [14th-15th c.]
  4. A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
  5. (architecture, military) A merlon.

References

  • “Cop” in Michael Quinion, Ballyhoo, Buckaroo, and Spuds: Ingenious Tales of Words and Their Origins, Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Books in association with Penguin Books, 2004, →ISBN.

See also

  • not much cop

Anagrams

  • CPO, OCP, OPC, PCO, POC, PoC

A-Pucikwar

Etymology

From Proto-Great Andamanese *cup

Noun

cop

  1. basket

References

  • Juliette Blevins, Linguistic clues to Andamanese pre-history: Understanding the North-South divide, pg. 20 (2009)

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Catalan colp, from Late Latin colpus (stroke), from earlier Latin colaphus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkɔp/

Noun

cop m (plural cops)

  1. hit, blow, strike
  2. time, occasion

Alternative forms

  • colp (dialectal)

Synonyms

  • (time, occasion): vegada, volta

Derived terms

  • copejar
  • cop de gràcia
  • cop baix
  • cop d'estat
  • cop d'ull
  • un cop

Further reading

  • “cop” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “cop” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “cop” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “cop” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Czech

Etymology

Borrowed from German Zopf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡sop]

Noun

cop m

  1. braid

Derived terms

  • copánek m
  • copatý m

Further reading

  • cop in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • cop in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology

A shortened form of copain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop m (plural cops)

  1. (informal) A friend, a pal.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cope, coppe

Etymology

From Old English cop, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop (plural coppes)

  1. summit (of a mountain or hill)
  2. top, tip, topmost part
  3. top of the head, crown
  4. head

Descendants

  • English: cop
  • Scots: cop, coppe
  • Welsh: copa

References

  • “cop (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-03-25.

Old French

Noun

cop m (oblique plural cos, nominative singular cos, nominative plural cop)

  1. Alternative form of colp

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Middle Irish copp, borrowed from either Old English copp or Middle English copp, both meaning "top," from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰɔhp/

Noun

cop m (genitive singular coip, plural coip)

  1. foam, froth

Derived terms

  • copach (foamy, frothy)
  • cop na mara (sea foam, spume)
  • copraich (fizz, verb)
  • cop ri do bheul (foaming at the mouth)

Verb

cop (past chop, future copidh, verbal noun copadh, past participle copte)

  1. capsize
  2. pour out, tip out
  3. foam, froth

Mutation


Slovak

Etymology

From German Zopf.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t͡sop]

Noun

cop m (genitive singular copu, nominative plural copy, genitive plural copov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. braid

Declension

Synonyms

  • vrkoč

Derived terms

  • copík, copček

Further reading

  • cop in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Volapük

Noun

cop (nominative plural cops)

  1. hoe (tool)

Declension


Welsh

Etymology

From Middle English coppe (spider).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔp/

Noun

cop m (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) spider
    Synonyms: copyn, corryn, pryf cop, pryf copyn

Usage notes

No longer found as an independent word, cop is now used as an element in other words for "spider", such as copyn, pryf cop and pryf copyn and derived terms.

Derived terms

  • copyn (spider)
  • pryf cop (spider)
  • pryf copyn (spider)

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cop”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to capture.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)