De in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is de a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word de is a Scrabble US word. The word de is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

D2E1

Is de a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word de is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

D2E1

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Yes. The word de is a Words With Friends word. The word de is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

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DE 3ED 3

Definitions and meaning of de

de

Translingual

Etymology

From French de.

Symbol

de

  1. (radio slang) from (operator), this is (operator)

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • dee (Northumbria)

Verb

de (third-person singular simple present diz, present participle dein, simple past did, past participle dyun)

  1. (Northumbria) To do.

References

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

Etymology 2

Article

de

  1. (African-American Vernacular, Bermuda, Caribbean) Pronunciation spelling of the.

Etymology 3

Interjection

de

  1. A meaningless syllable used when singing a tune or indicating a rhythm.
    "Dum de dum, dum de dum", he hummed as he sauntered down the road.

Anagrams

  • -ed, -èd, E.D., ED, Ed, Ed., ed, ed-, ed.

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • der (prevocalic)
  • dr (Bern)

Article

de

  1. (definite) the

Declension

  • Masculine nominative/accusative singular de has the form der before a vowel, e.g. der alt Maa ‘the old man’
  • Dative plural de has the form den before a vowel, e.g. den alte Fraue ‘(to) the old women’
  • Feminine singular d and plural d have the variant di before an adjective, e.g. di jung Mueter ‘the young mother’

Other forms include:

  • Nominative masculine: der (preconsonantic & prevocalic)
  • Nominative feminine and plural: d- (attached before a word, whose capital remains a capital), d'- (attached before a word, whose capital remains a capital)
  • Nominative neuter: das; s'- (attached before a word, whose capital remains a capital)

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of, from

Usage notes

  • The preposition de contracts to d' before a word beginning with a vowel or h-: d'Asturies (of Asturias), d'hermanu (of a brother).

Derived terms

  • d'
  • del

Bambara

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [dè]

Particle

de

  1. emphatic particle

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Basque

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Noun

de inan

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.
Declension

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) a, be, ze, de, e, efe, ge, hatxe, i, jota, ka, ele, eme, ene, eñe, o, pe, ku, erre, ese, te, u, uve, uve bikoitz, ixa, i greko, zeta

Catalan

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈde/

Noun

de f (plural des)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

Etymology 2

From Latin .

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /də/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /de/

Preposition

de (before vowel or h d')

  1. of, from

Further reading

  • “de” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Cebuano

Etymology

From Spanish de.

Preposition

de

  1. (dated) of, from (only in names with Spanish origins or in phrases with Spanish construct)

Related terms

  • del, dela

Central Franconian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /də/

Article

de (definite, reduced)

  1. (most dialects) feminine nominative and accusative
  2. (most dialects) plural nominative and accusative
  3. (many dialects) plural dative
  4. (some dialects) masculine nominative
  5. (some dialects) masculine accusative
  6. (few dialects) feminine dative

Usage notes

  • (masculine): Three territories must be distinguished: 1.) Ripuarian, in which the accusative takes the form of the nominative; 2.) western Moselle Franconian, in which the nominative takes the form of the accusative; 3.) eastern Moselle Franconian, in which nominative and accusative are distinct.
1.) In Ripuarian, the reduced masculine article in nominative and accusative is de only in a few places, including Bonn; most dialects have der. The full form is always .
2.) In western Moselle Franconian, the form is de, but becomes den before vowels, h-, and dental consonants. The full form is dän.
3.) In eastern Moselle Franconian, the reduced masculine article in the nominative is de in many dialects, der in others. The full form is där. The accusative takes den (full form: dän).
  • (feminine): Virtually all dialects use de as the reduced feminine article in nominative and accusative. The full form is die. In the dative, de is used in a few dialects of Ripuarian; the general form is der. The full form may be där or .
  • (plural): Virtually all dialects use de as the reduced plural article in nominative and accusative. The full form is die. In the dative, de is used in most dialects of Ripuarian. In Moselle Franconian the form is the same as the masculine accusative (see above). The full form of the dative plural may be dä, dän, or däne.
  • Westernmost Ripuarian has no case distinction whatsoever. Only the nominative forms are relevant for these dialects.

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • di (Luserna)

Article

de

  1. (Sette Comuni) the; definite article for four declensions:
    1. nominative singular feminine
    2. accusative singular feminine
    3. nominative plural
    4. accusative plural

See also

References

  • “de” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Dalmatian

Etymology

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of

Related terms

  • dei

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /di/, [d̥i]
  • Rhymes: -i

Etymology

From Old Danish thē, from Old Norse þeir, from Proto-Germanic *þai.

Article

de pl

  1. plural definite article
    de grønne huse
    the green houses

See also

  • den (common gender singular)
  • det (neuter gender singular)

Pronoun

de (as a personal pronoun, it has the forms dem in the oblique case and deres in the genitive; as a determiner, it is uninflected)

  1. (personal pronoun) they (third-person plural)
  2. (personal pronoun, nonstandard) they (gender-neutral third-person singular)
  3. (determiner) those
    • 2000, Mon farven har en anden lyd?: strejftog i 90'ernes musikliv og ungdomskultur i Danmark, Museum Tusculanum Press →ISBN, page 90
    • 2015, Lynne Graham, Claire Baxter, Den lunefulde kærlighed/Min bedste ven, min elskede, Förlaget Harlequin AB →ISBN

See also


Dutch

Etymology

An unstressed variety of Middle Dutch die. See die for more information.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /də/
  • Hyphenation: de
  • Rhymes:

Article

de

  1. the (definite article, masculine and feminine singular, plural)

Usage notes

  • Placed before masculine and feminine nouns in the singular and plural nouns of all genders, indicating a specific person or thing instead of a general case.

Inflection

  • There is also the clitic form 's for des. The oblique cases are archaic and found in contemporary Dutch only in fixed idiomatic phrases (e.g., op den duur or des ochtends).

Derived terms

  • dezelfde

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: die

See also

  • een
  • het

Anagrams

  • e.d.

Esperanto

Etymology

From Latin , French de, Spanish de.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/
  • Hyphenation: de

Preposition

de

  1. from
  2. of, possessed by
  3. done, written or composed by
    Synonyms: far, fare de

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese de, from Latin (of; from).

Preposition

de

  1. of

Usage notes

Contractions:

  • de + o: do
  • de + os: dos
  • de + a: da
  • de + as: das

Faroese

Noun

de n (genitive singular des, plural de)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

Declension

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) bókstavur; a / fyrra a, á, be, de, edd, e, eff, ge, há, i / fyrra i, í / fyrra í, jodd, ká, ell, emm, enn, o, ó, pe, err, ess, te, u, ú, ve, seinna i, seinna í, seinna a, ø

French

Etymology 1

From Latin .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /də/
  • Rhymes:

Preposition

de

  1. of (expresses belonging)
  2. of (used to express property or association)
  3. from (used to indicate origin)
  4. of (indicates an amount)
  5. used attributively, often translated into English as a compound word
  6. from (used to indicate the start of a time or range)
  7. used after certain verbs before an infinitive, often translated into English as a gerund or an infinitive
  8. by (indicates the amount of change)
Usage notes

Before a word beginning with a vowel sound, de elides to d’. Before the article le, it contracts with the article into du, as shown in the example above. Before the article les, it contracts with the article into des.

Le Songe d’une nuit d’été — “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Literally, “The Dream of a night of summer”)
La queue du chien — “The dog’s tail”
Index des auteurs — “Index of the authors”

Article

de (interrogative) (negative, negation)

  1. (indefinite) some; any (in questions or negatives)
  2. (negative) (pas de) a, an, any
Usage notes

In the positive, de is usually used with a definite article, as in the examples. In the negative, without an article.

Derived terms

  • (contractions): d’, du, des

Etymology 2

Noun

de (plural des)

  1. Abbreviation of dame.
See also
  • dlle
  • sr

Further reading

  • “de” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • ed, éd.

Galician

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

Preposition

de

  1. of, from

Usage notes

The preposition de contracts to d- before articles, before third-person tonic pronouns, and before the determiners algún and outro.

Derived terms

  • da, das, do, dos
  • dalgún, dalgunha, dalgunhas, dalgúns
  • del, dela, delas, deles
  • dun, dunha, dunhas, duns
  • doutra, doutras, doutro, doutros

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French deux (two)

Numeral

de

  1. two

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈdɛ]
  • Rhymes: -dɛ

Adverb

de (not comparable)

  1. how!, very much

Synonyms

  • be (dated, poetic)
  • milyen
  • mennyire

Conjunction

de

  1. but
    Synonyms: viszont, azonban, ám, ugyanakkor, ellenben
  2. (oh) yes!, surely! (used as a positive contradiction to a negative statement)
    Synonym: de igen

Derived terms

  • ámde
  • dehogy
  • dehát
  • deviszont

(Expressions):

  • a lélek kész, de a test erőtlen

See also

  • csak
  • dehát
  • és
  • mégis

Further reading

  • (adverb): de in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (conjunction): de in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • de in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress)

Hunsrik

Alternative forms

  • te (Wiesemann spelling system)

Etymology

From Middle High German der, from Old High German der, ther, replacing the original masculine and feminine nominative forms from Proto-Germanic *sa, by analogy with the adjective inflection.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tə/

Article

de (definite)

  1. inflection of där:
    1. unstressed nominative/accusative singular masculine
    2. unstressed dative singular feminine
    3. unstressed dative plural all genders

Declension

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Ido

Etymology

Borrowed from French de and Spanish de.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/, /dɛ/

Preposition

de

  1. from (indicating departure, dependency, starting point, origin or derivation)
  2. of (with a noun: indicating measurement, quantity, amount, content)
  3. of (with an adjective: indicating measurement, dimension)
  4. with a title of nobility

Antonyms

  • ad (to)
  • til (until, till)

Derived terms

  • de-
  • del (from the)

Related terms

  • di (of (indicates possession or association))
  • da (by)

Noun

de (plural de-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter D/d.

See also

  • (Latin script letter names) litero; a, be, ce, che, de, e, fe, ge, he, i, je, ke, le, me, ne, o, pe, que, re, se, she, te, u, ve, we, xe, ye, ze (Category: io:Latin letter names)

See also

  • ek (out of, out from)

Interlingua

Preposition

de

  1. from
  2. since
  3. of
  4. with
  5. by means of
  6. to
  7. for

Irish

Etymology 1

From Old Irish di (of, from)

Alternative forms

  • d’ (used before a vowel sound)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʲɛ/, /dʲə/
  • (Galway) IPA(key): /ɡə/

Preposition

de (plus dative, triggers lenition, used only before consonant sounds)

  1. from
  2. of
Inflection
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish de (of/from him).

Alternative forms

  • dhe, , dhó

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʲɛ/

Pronoun

de (emphatic desean)

  1. third-person singular masculine of de

Further reading

  • "de" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 de, di”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “de” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “de” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Italian

Contraction

de

  1. Apocopic form of del

Usage notes

De is used where del, della, etc, would ordinarily be used, but cannot be because the article is part of the title of a film, book, etc.

See also

  • ne

Anagrams

  • ed

Japanese

Romanization

de

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Jersey Dutch

Etymology

Cognate to Dutch de (the).

Article

de

  1. the
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      De v'lôrene zön
      The prodigal (literally "lost") son

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of, from

Derived terms

  • dl
  • dla
  • di
  • dles

Ladino

Preposition

de (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling די)

  1. of
  2. from

Lashi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Noun

de

  1. wealth

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[4], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis).

Latin

Etymology 1

From Etruscan. Etruscan names of stops were the stop followed by /eː/.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /deː/, [d̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /de/, [d̪ɛ]

Noun

 f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter D.
Coordinate terms
  • (Latin-script letter names) littera; ā, bē, cē, , ē, ef, gē, hā, ī, kā, el, em, en, ō, pē, kū, er, es, tē, ū, ix / īx / ex, ȳ / ī graeca / ȳpsīlon, zēta

References

  • de in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • de in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • de in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • de in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), part III: “Summary of the Ancient Evidence”, page 32: "Clearly there is no question or doubt about the names of the vowels A, E, I, O, U. They are simply long A, long E, etc. (ā, ē, ī, ō, ū). Nor is there any uncertainty with respect to the six mutes B, C, D, G, P, T. Their names are bē, cē, dē, gē, pē, tē (each with a long E). Or about H, K, and Q: they are hā, kā, kū—each, again, with a long vowel sound."

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *de. Also in suffixes -dam, -dum, -de, -dō (e.g. quondam, inde, unde, quandō), dōnec, Ancient Greek δέ (), δή (dḗ), English to.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /deː/, [d̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /de/, [d̪ɛ]

Preposition

(+ ablative)

  1. of, concerning, about
  2. from, away from, down from, out of; in general to indicate the person or place from which any thing is taken, etc., with verbs of taking away, depriving, demanding, requesting, inquiring, buying; as capere, sumere, emere, quaerere, discere, trahere, etc., and their compounds.
    1. with petere, of a place
    2. (Late Latin) of persons
  3. from, away from, to indicate the place from which someone or something departs or withdraws.
    (compare excedere e vita)
Usage notes
  • denotes the going out, departure, removal, or separating of an object from any fixed point (it occupies a middle place between ab (away from) which denotes a mere external departure, and ex (out of) which signifies from the interior of a thing. Hence verbs compounded with are constructed not only with , but quite as frequently with ab and ex; and, on the other hand, those compounded with ab and ex often have the terminus a quo indicated by .
Derived terms
  • dēex
  • dēmum
  • dēniquē
  • dēterior
  • sexāgēnārios dē ponte
  • susque dēque
Descendants

Ligurian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Etymology 1

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of
  2. from

Etymology 2

de (of, from, preposition) + e (the (fem. plur.), article)

Contraction

de

  1. of the, from the (followed by a plural feminine noun)

Low German

Alternative forms

  • dee (for the pronoun)
  • dei

Etymology

From Middle Low German , from Old Saxon thē.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deː/, /deɪ/, /dɛɪ̯/

Article

de m or f (neuter dat, plural de)

  1. the

Usage notes

  • Dative and accusative are sometimes called 'object case'. However, most (if not all) dialects have not actually merged these two.
  • There is the only plural article and like English 'the' is used for nouns of every gender and class. Indefinite nouns in plural are used without article, again as in English.

Declension

Pronoun

de m or f (neuter dat)

  1. (relative) which, that

Usage notes

  • The use as a relative pronoun might not be present in all dialects.

Declension


Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [də]

Pronoun

de

  1. unstressed form of du

Declension


Mandarin

Romanization

de (Zhuyin ˙ㄉㄜ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of
  3. Pinyin transcription of
  4. Pinyin transcription of
  5. Pinyin transcription of
  6. Pinyin transcription of 𠵨
  7. Pinyin transcription of

de

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French deux.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Numeral

de

  1. two

Derived terms

  • de trwa

Middle Dutch

Article

de

  1. inflection of die:
    1. masculine nominative singular
    2. feminine nominative/accusative singular
    3. nominative/accusative plural

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English þē.

Pronoun

de

  1. Alternative form of þe.
References
  • “the, (pron.2)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 May 2018.

Etymology 2

From Old French de.

Noun

de

  1. Alternative form of dee

Middle French

Preposition

de

  1. of
  2. from

Mirandese

Etymology

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of, from

Mòcheno

Etymology

From Middle High German diu, from Old High German diu, from Proto-Germanic *þō, an alteration of *sō. Cognate with German die, obsolete English tho.

Article

de (singular masculine der, singular neuter s)

  1. the, nominative singular feminine definite article
  2. the, nominative plural definite article

References

  • “de” in Cimbrian, Ladin, Mòcheno: Getting to know 3 peoples. 2015. Servizio minoranze linguistiche locali della Provincia autonoma di Trento, Trento, Italy.

Northern Kurdish

Postposition

de

  1. an element of several circumpositions

Related terms

  • di ... de
  • li ... de
  • ji ... de

Northern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-de, from Proto-Bantu *-dàì.

Adjective

-de

  1. tall

Inflection

This relative needs an inflection-table template.


Northern Sami

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈte/

Conjunction

de

  1. then, after that
  2. then, in that case

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[5], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Adverb

de

  1. yes

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /diː/

Article

de

  1. definite article, equivalent to "the", used before adjectives used with plural nouns; also used before adjectives converted to nouns. Usually capitalised as "De" when used in proper nouns.

Related terms

  • den
  • det

Pronoun

de (accusative dem, genitive deres)

  1. they
  2. those

See also

References

  • “de” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse þér, ér and þit, it. From a variant of Proto-Germanic *jūz, from Proto-Indo-European *yū́.

Pronoun

de (objective case dykk, possessive dykkar)

  1. you (second-person plural)
Synonyms
  • dokker

See also

Etymology 2

From French de, Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. used in set expressions (such as de jure); translates to "from" and "of"

References

  • “de” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Etymology 1

Inherited from Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of
  2. from
Alternative forms
  • d' (before a vowel)

Etymology 2

Noun

de f (plural des)

  1. dee (the letter d, D)

Old French

Etymology

Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of
  2. from

Usage notes

  • before a vowel, either remains as a separate word or becomes d'

Derived terms

  • del (de + le)

Old Irish

Preposition

de

  1. Alternative form of di (of, from)

Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin

Preposition

de

  1. of
  2. from

Old Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • d- (elided form when followed by a word which begins with a vowel)
  • D- (elided form when followed by a capitalised word which begins with a vowel)

Etymology

From Latin (of; from).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Preposition

de

  1. of
    • 13th century, attributed to Alfonso X of Castile, Cantigas de Santa Maria, To codex, cantiga 5 (facsimile):
      Eſta ·xviiii· é como ſṫa maria aiudou · á emperadriz de roma · a ſofrer as grãdes coitaſ per que paſſou.
      This 19th is how Holy Mary helped the empress of Rome suffer the great pains she underwent.

Descendants

  • Fala: de
  • Galician: de
  • Portuguese: de

Pennsylvania German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /də/

Etymology

Compare German den.

Article

de pl (definite)

  1. the

Declension

Pronoun

de

  1. you

Declension


Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • d' (archaic, except for fixed terms)

Etymology

From Old Portuguese de (of), from Latin (of).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /dɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /d͡ʒi/
    • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /de/
    • (Nordestino) IPA(key): /di/
    • (Caipira) IPA(key): /di/
  • Homophone: (only when stressed)

Preposition

de

  1. of (in relation to)
    1. of (forms compounds; often untranslated)
    2. of; about (on the subject of)
    3. of; -'s (belonging to)
    4. -'s (made by)
    5. of (being a part of)
    6. of (introduces the month a given day is part of)
    7. of (introduces the object of an agent noun)
    8. of (introduces the name of a place following its hypernym)
  2. of; -en (made or consisting of)
    1. -long (having the duration of)
    2. of (indicates the composition of a given collective or quantitative noun)
    3. of (characterised by; having the given quality)
  3. of (introduces the noun that applies a given adjective or past participle)
  4. from (born in or coming out of)
  5. by means of; by
  6. as (in the role of)
  7. in (wearing)

Usage notes

Used in the following contractions:

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:de.


Romanian

Etymology

From Latin .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/
  • Rhymes: -e

Preposition

de (+accusative)

  1. from
  2. of
  3. by

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) di
  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) gi

Etymology

From Latin diēs.

Noun

de m (plural des)

  1. (Surmiran) day

Scottish Gaelic

Alternative forms

  • dhe

Etymology

From Old Irish di, from Proto-Celtic *dī.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʲe/

Preposition

de (+ dative)

  1. of, off

Derived terms

  • bhàrr (down from, from off)
  • The following prepositional pronouns:

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *kъdě, *kъde, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷu-dʰe.

Adverb

de (Cyrillic spelling де)

  1. (Kajkavian, regional) where

Pronoun

de (Cyrillic spelling де)

  1. (Kajkavian, regional) where

Synonyms

  • gdje

Seychellois Creole

Etymology

From French deux

Numeral

de

  1. two

Southern Ndebele

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-de, from Proto-Bantu *-dàì.

Adjective

-de

  1. tall

Inflection

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • (after a pause, 'l', 'm', 'n' and 'ñ') IPA(key): /de/, [d̪e̞]
  • (elsewhere) IPA(key): /de/, [ð̞e̞]
  • Homophone:
  • IPA(key): /de/, [d̪e]
  • Rhymes: -e

Etymology 1

Noun

de f (plural des)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

Etymology 2

From Latin .

Preposition

de

  1. of; ’s; used after the thing owned and before the owner
  2. from (with the source or provenance of or at)
  3. of (expressing composition, substance)
  4. about (concerning; with regard to)
    Synonyms: sobre, acerca de
  5. of, from (indicating cause)
  6. of (indicates a quality or characteristic)
  7. from (with the origin, starting point or initial reference of or at)
    Synonym: desde
  8. of (indicates the subject or cause of the adjective)
  9. from (with the separation, exclusion or differentiation of)
  10. than (in certain phrases)
  11. Used to construct compound nouns (with attributive nouns).
  12. (followed by the infinitive) Indicates a conditional desire.
  13. Indicates a time of day or period of someone's life.
  14. (after a noun and before a verb) Indicates the purpose of an object.
    Synonym: para
Usage notes
  • de combines with el to form del.
Derived terms
  • del
  • dequeísmo

Related terms

  • desde

Further reading

  • “de” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From English there.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /de/

Verb

de

  1. (copula) to be.

Particle

de

  1. (dated) Alternative form of e.

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • (informal) dom
  • (informal, dialectal) di

Etymology

From Old Norse þeir, from Proto-Germanic *þai (with noun ending -r).

Pronunciation

  • (Sweden) IPA(key): /dɔm/, (formal) IPA(key): /deː/, (dialectal) IPA(key): /diː/, IPA(key): /dɪ/
  • Homophones: det, D, d (if pronounced /deː/.)
  • (Finland) IPA(key): /diː/
  • Rhymes: -eː

Pronoun

de (third-person plural nominative, dative and accusative dem, genitive deras, reflexive sig)

  1. they
  2. (colloquial, text messaging, Internet) Pronunciation spelling of det.

Declension

Article

de

  1. the, a definite article used in the beginning of noun phrases containing attributive adjectives and nouns in the plural. This article is used together with the definite suffix of the noun to indicate the definiteness of the noun phrase.
  2. (colloquial, text messaging, Internet) Pronunciation spelling of det.

Usage notes

The same type of noun phrases with singular nouns instead use den (common gender) or det (neuter) for this function. Some definite noun phrases with attributive adjectives may skip these preceding articles. This is the case especially for many lexicalized noun phrases and also for many noun phrases working as proper names of organisations, geographical places, TV shows, events and similar.

Brittiska öarna
The British Isles

While the personal pronoun de has an object form and a genitive form, the definite article de is unaffected by the syntactic role of the noun phrase.

Anagrams

  • e.d., ed

Tarantino

Preposition

de

  1. of

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English day.

Noun

de

  1. day

Related terms

  • asde
  • gude
  • hapasde
  • olde
  • olde olde
  • pede
  • sande
  • seven de
  • tede
  • tude

See also

  • (days of the week) ol de bilong wik; Mande, Tunde, Trinde, Fonde, Fraide, Sarere, Sande (Category: tpi:Days of the week)

Turkish

Adverb

de

  1. as well, too, also

Usage notes

  • It's used when the previous word's last vowel is "e", "i", "ö" or "ü". Otherwise (if the word's last vowel is "a", "ı", "o" or "u"); it becomes "da"

Synonyms

  • da

Noun

de

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

Verb

de

  1. (imperative) say

See also

  • (Latin script letter names) harf; a, be, ce, çe, de, e, fe, ge, yumuşak ge, he, ı, i, je, ke, le, me, ne, o, ö, pe, re, se, şe, te, u, ü, ve, ye, ze (Category: tr:Latin letter names)

Volapük

Preposition

de

  1. of, from

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deː/

Etymology 1

Contraction of older deau (right; south), from Proto-Celtic *dexsos (right). Cognate with Cornish dyhow, Breton dehou, Irish deas, Scottish Gaelic deas, Manx jiass.

The sense "south" comes from the fact that the south is on the right-hand side of a person facing east.

Adjective

de (feminine singular de, plural de, not comparable)

  1. right (opposite of left)
  2. south, southern (abbreviation: D)
Derived terms
  • Môr y De (the South Sea)
  • Pegwn y De (the South Pole)

Noun

de m or f (uncountable)

  1. right
  2. south
  3. (as y De, when in Wales) South Wales
Usage notes
  • The noun has masculine gender when used with the sense of "south" and feminine gender when used with the sense "right".
Mutation
Derived terms
  • de-ddwyrain (south-east)
  • de-orllewin (south-west)

Antonyms

  • gogledd

Etymology 2

Mutated form of te (tea).

Noun

de

  1. Soft mutation of te.

Mutation

References


West Frisian

Etymology

Compare Dutch and Low German de, English the, German der.

Determiner

de

  1. the; definite article

Usage notes

After one-syllable prepositions ending in a consonant, the variant 'e is used.

Inflection

  • Common singular: de
  • Neuter singular: it
  • Plural: de

Further reading

  • “de”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Xhosa

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-de, from Proto-Bantu *-dàì.

Adjective

-de

  1. tall

Inflection


Zande

Noun

de

  1. woman

Zealandic

Etymology

An unstressed variety of Middle Dutch die.

Determiner

de

  1. the (definite article)

Inflection

  • Masculine: de, d'n (before b, d, t or a vowel)
  • Feminine: de
  • Neuter: 't
  • Plural: de

Zhuang

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Proto-Zhuang-Tai *te.A?”)

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /te˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: de1
  • Hyphenation: de

Pronoun

de (Sawndip forms 他, 𬿇, 𭶼, 爹, 佚, old orthography de)

  1. he; she; it

See also


Zulu

Etymology

From Proto-Nguni *-de, from Proto-Bantu *-dàì. The expected reflex would be -le, however it was changed due to analogy with its class 8, 9, and 10 forms (zinde, inde, zinde).

Adjective

-de

  1. long
  2. tall, high

Inflection

Derived terms

  • -dana
  • ubude

Verb

-de

  1. (auxiliary) always [+participial]

Inflection

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

References

  • C. M. Doke; B. W. Vilakazi (1972) , “-dé”, in Zulu-English Dictionary, →ISBN: “-dé
  • C. M. Doke; B. W. Vilakazi (1972) , “-de”, in Zulu-English Dictionary, →ISBN: “-de

ǃKung

Noun

de

  1. woman

Synonyms

  • ǯau
  • zau

Source: wiktionary.org
  • from (as used in names).
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)