Dub in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does dub mean? Is dub a Scrabble word?

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Is dub a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word dub is a Scrabble US word. The word dub is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

D2U1B3

Is dub a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word dub is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

D2U1B3

Is dub a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word dub is a Words With Friends word. The word dub is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

D2U2B4

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Valid words made from Dub

You can make 2 words from 'dub' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'dub'

BUD 6DUB 6

All 3 letters words made out of dub

dub udb dbu bdu ubd bud

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word dub. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in dub.

Definitions and meaning of dub

dub

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1

From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban (to knight by striking with a sword) perhaps borrowed from Old French aduber, adober (equip with arms; adorn) (also 11th century, Modern French adouber), from Frankish *dubban, from Proto-Germanic *dubjaną (to fit), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (plug, peg, wedge).

Cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) (now historical) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with a sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call. [from the later 16th c]
    • As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
  3. (transitive) To deem.
    • 1733-1738, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace
      A man of wealth is dubbed a man of worth.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
    • His diadem was dropped down / Dubbed with stones.
  5. (heading) To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
      • 1852-1866, Charles Tomlinson, Cyclopaedia of Useful Arts and Manufactures
        When the skin is thoroughly cleansed, and while yet in its wet and distended state, the process of stuffing, or dubbing (probably a corruption of daubing), is performed. Both sides of the skin, but chiefly the flesh side, are smeared or daubed with a mixture of cod-oil and tallow
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.

Synonyms

  • (to confer knighthood): knight
  • (to name, to entitle, to call.): designate, name; see also Thesaurus:denominate
  • (to deem): consider, think of; see also Thesaurus:deem
  • (to clothe or invest): deck out, embellish; see also Thesaurus:decorate
Translations

Etymology 2

1505-1515 This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
    • Now the drum dubb's.
  2. To do something badly.
  3. (golf) To execute a shot poorly.

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow, thrust, or poke.

Etymology 3

1885-90; Imitative, see also flub, flubdub

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang, now historical) An unskillful, awkward person. [from the later part of the 19th c]
    • 1969, Robert L. Vann, The Competitor (volumes 2-3, page 135)
      The miser, a-seeking lost gelt, / The doughboy, awaiting the battle, / May possibly know how I felt / While the long years dragged by as the dealer / As slow as the slowest of dubs, / Stuck out the last helping of tickets / 'Till I lifted—the Bullet of Clubs!

Etymology 4

From a shortening of the word double.

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To add sound to film or change audio on film. [from the first half of the 20th c]
  2. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Derived terms
  • overdub
See also
  • ADR
  • revoice
Translations

Noun

dub (countable and uncountable, plural dubs)

  1. (music, countable) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music, uncountable) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music, uncountable) A trend in music starting in 2009, in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
  4. (slang, countable) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
  5. (countable) The replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; an instance of dubbing.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 5

From Celtic; compare Irish dobhar (water), Welsh dŵr (water).

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (Britain, dialect) A pool or puddle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Kidnapped
      “Has he nae friends?” said she, in a tearful voice.
      “That has he so!” cried Alan, “if we could but win to them!—friends and rich friends, beds to lie in, food to eat, doctors to see to him—and here he must tramp in the dubs and sleep in the heather like a beggarman.”

Etymology 6

From shortening of double dime (twenty).

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.

Etymology 7

From dup (to open), from do + up, from Middle English don up (to open).

Verb

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To open or close.

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A lock.
  2. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A key, especially a master key; a lockpick.
Derived terms

Etymology 8

Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. Clipping of double-u.
    • 2018, Corey Pein, Live Work Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley, Metropolitan Books (→ISBN), page 119:
      I once met a gaggle of Aussies who'd paid thousands of dollars out of their own pockets for airfare and registration to attend an annual Apple convention called the Worldwide Developers Conference, or WWDC—or, in this crowd, “Dub Dub.
    • 1997, Nelson Howell, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Microsoft Visual InterDev, Que Pub (→ISBN)
      World Wide Web or WWW Pronouncing this “ dub dub dub " ( with no rub - a ) will definitely establish you as an insider . This is a graphical presentation of information with hyperlinks . It was created at CERN in Switzerland as a method of ...

Anagrams

  • BDU, BUD, Bud, DBU, bud

Czech

Etymology

From Old Czech dub, from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ (oak tree, oak)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈdup]
  • Hyphenation: dub
  • Rhymes: -up
  • Homophone: dup

Noun

dub m inan

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • dub in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • dub in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Anagrams

  • bud

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dup/

Noun

dub m

  1. oak

Declension

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “dub”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • dub in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Old Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ (oak tree, oak)

Noun

dub m

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

Descendants

  • Czech: dub

Further reading

  • “dub”, in Vokabulář webový: webové hnízdo pramenů k poznání historické češtiny [online][3], Praha: Ústav pro jazyk český AV ČR, 2006–2020

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *dubus (black), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (black, deep).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /duv/

Adjective

dub

  1. black
  2. morally dark, dire, gloomy, melancholy

Inflection

Descendants

  • Irish: dubh
  • Scottish Gaelic: dubh
  • Manx: doo

Noun

dub n (genitive dubo)

  1. black pigment, ink
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 15a10
      ó dub glosses atramento
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 13d1
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 217a
  2. gall

Inflection

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “dub”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

San Juan Guelavía Zapotec

Etymology

From Proto-Zapotec *tokwaʔ.

Noun

dub

  1. agave

References

  • López Antonio, Joaquín; Jones, Ted; Jones, Kris (2012) Vocabulario breve del Zapoteco de San Juan Guelavía[4] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Tlalpan, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., pages 14, 26

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰanw-.

Noun

dub m (Cyrillic spelling дуб)

  1. (Croatia, archaic) oak (wood)
  2. (Croatia, archaic) oak tree
    • c. 1840, Dragutin Rakovac (translating Samuel Tomášik), Hej, Slaveni:

Synonyms

  • hrast

Derived terms

  • Dubrovnik

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdup/

Noun

dub m (genitive singular duba, nominative plural duby, genitive plural dubov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

Derived terms

Further reading

  • dub in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Spanish

Noun

dub m (plural dubs)

  1. (music) dub

Sumerian

Romanization

dub

  1. Romanization of 𒁾 (dub)

Volapük

Preposition

dub

  1. due to, because of

Derived terms

  • dubä

Zhuang

Pronunciation

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /tup˧/
  • Tone numbers: dub8
  • Hyphenation: dub

Etymology 1

From Proto-Tai *dupᴬ (to pound); cognate with Thai ทุบ (túp), Lao ທຸບ (thup), Shan ထုပ်ႉ (thṵ̂p). Also compare Cantonese 𢱕 (dap6, “to pound; to strike”).

Verb

dub (Sawndip forms 𭡡 or 𰔥 or 𭡫, old orthography dub)

  1. to hit; to strike
    Synonym: moeb
  2. to strike with a hammer; to hammer
  3. to castrate (a male water buffalo)

Etymology 2

Verb

dub (old orthography dub)

  1. to harrow (a paddy)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to confer knighthood on.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)