Law in Scrabble Dictionary

What does law mean? Is law a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is law worth? law how many points in Words With Friends? What does law mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for law

See how to calculate how many points for law.

Is law a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word law is a Scrabble US word. The word law is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

L1A1W4

Is law a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word law is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

L1A1W4

Is law a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word law is a Words With Friends word. The word law is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2A1W4

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Valid words made from Law

You can make 5 words from 'law' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'law'

AWL 6LAW 6

2 letters words from 'law'

AL 2AW 5
LA 2 

All 3 letters words made out of law

law alw lwa wla awl wal

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word law. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in law.

Definitions and meaning of law

law

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: , IPA(key): /lɔː/
    • Rhymes: -ɔː
  • (US) enPR: , IPA(key): /lɔ/
  • (cotcaught merger) enPR: , IPA(key): /lɑ/
  • Homophone: lore (in non-rhotic accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English lawe, laȝe, from Old English lagu (law), from Old Norse lǫg (law, literally things laid down or fixed), originally the plural of lag (layer, stratum, a laying in order, measure, stroke), from Proto-Germanic *lagą (that which is laid down), from Proto-Indo-European *legʰ- (to lie). Cognate with Icelandic lög (things laid down, law), Swedish lag (law), Danish lov (law). Replaced Old English ǣ and ġesetnes. More at lay. Unrelated to French loi if it derives from *leǵ- (to gather), otherwise cognate.

Noun

law (countable and uncountable, plural laws)

  1. The body of binding rules and regulations, customs, and standards established in a community by its legislative and judicial authorities.
    1. The body of such rules that pertain to a particular topic.
    2. Common law, as contrasted with equity.
  2. A binding regulation or custom established in a community in this way.
  3. (more generally) A rule, such as:
    1. Any rule that must or should be obeyed, concerning behaviours and their consequences. (Compare mores.)
    2. A rule or principle regarding the construction of language or art.
    3. A statement (in physics, etc) of an (observed, established) order or sequence or relationship of phenomena which is invariable under certain conditions. (Compare theory.)
      • 1992 March 2, Richard Preston, The New Yorker, "The Mountains of Pi":
        Observing pi is easier than studying physical phenomena, because you can prove things in mathematics, whereas you can’t prove anything in physics. And, unfortunately, the laws of physics change once every generation.
    4. (mathematics, logic) A statement (of relation) that is true under specified conditions; a mathematical or logical rule.
    5. Any statement of the relation of acts and conditions to their consequences.
    6. (cricket) One of the official rules of cricket as codified by the its (former) governing body, the MCC.
  4. The control and order brought about by the observance of such rules.
  5. (informal) A person or group that act(s) with authority to uphold such rules and order (for example, one or more police officers).
  6. The profession that deals with such rules (as lawyers, judges, police officers, etc).
  7. Jurisprudence, the field of knowledge which encompasses these rules.
  8. Litigation, legal action (as a means of maintaining or restoring order, redressing wrongs, etc).
  9. (now uncommon) An allowance of distance or time (a head start) given to a weaker (human or animal) competitor in a race, to make the race more fair.
  10. (fantasy) One of two metaphysical forces ruling the world in some fantasy settings, also called order, and opposed to chaos.
  11. (law, chiefly historical) An oath sworn before a court, especially disclaiming a debt. (Chiefly in the phrases "wager of law", "wage one's law", "perform one's law", "lose one's law".)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

law (third-person singular simple present laws, present participle lawing, simple past and past participle lawed)

  1. (obsolete) To work as a lawyer; to practice law.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, chiefly dialectal) To prosecute or sue (someone), to litigate.
    • 1860, George Eliot (Mary Anne Lewes), The Mill on the Floss:
      Your husband's [...] so given to lawing, they say. I doubt he'll leave you poorly off when he dies.
  3. (nonstandard) To rule over (with a certain effect) by law; govern.
  4. (informal) To enforce the law.
  5. To subject to legal restrictions.

See also

  • Appendix:Legal terms
  • Appendix:Glossary of legal terms
  • Category:Law
  • lawe

Etymology 2

From Middle English lawe, from Old English hlāw (burial mound). Also spelled low.

Noun

law (plural laws)

  1. (obsolete) A tumulus of stones.
  2. (Scotland and Northern England, archaic) A hill.

Etymology 3

Compare la.

Interjection

law

  1. (dated) An exclamation of mild surprise; lawks.

References

Etymology in ODS

Anagrams

  • AWL, WAL, Wal., awl, lwa

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *lьvъ, from Proto-Indo-European *lewo-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /law/

Noun

law m (diminutive lawk, feminine equivalent lawowka)

  1. lion (Panthera leo)

Declension

Derived terms

  • lawica
  • lawik
  • lawowy

Middle English

Noun

law

  1. Alternative form of lawe

Scots

Noun

law (plural laws)

  1. law
  2. rounded hill (usually conical, frequently isolated or conspicuous)

Sranan Tongo

Verb

law

  1. To be crazy

Upper Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *lьvъ, from Proto-Indo-European *lewo-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lau̯/

Noun

law m

  1. lion (Panthera leo)

Declension

Derived terms

  • lawica, lawjace/-a/-y, lawowe/-a/-y

Welsh

Noun

law

  1. Soft mutation of glaw (rain).

Mutation

Noun

law

  1. Soft mutation of llaw (hand).

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • (Scots) low.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)