Pus in Scrabble Dictionary

What does pus mean? Is pus a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is pus worth? pus how many points in Words With Friends? What does pus mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for pus

See how to calculate how many points for pus.

Is pus a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word pus is a Scrabble US word. The word pus is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

P3U1S1

Is pus a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word pus is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

P3U1S1

Is pus a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word pus is a Words With Friends word. The word pus is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

P4U2S1

Our tools

Valid words made from Pus

You can make 5 words from 'pus' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'pus'

PUS 5SUP 5
UPS 5 

2 letters words from 'pus'

UP 4US 2

All 3 letters words made out of pus

pus ups psu spu usp sup

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word pus. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in pus.

Definitions and meaning of pus

pus

Etymology

From Latin pūs, meaning the same.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pŭs, IPA(key): /pʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

pus (uncountable)

  1. A whitish-yellow or yellow substance composed primarily of dead white blood cells and dead pyogenic bacteria; normally found in regions of bacterial infection.

Derived terms

  • pussy

Translations

Verb

pus (third-person singular simple present pusses, present participle pussing, simple past and past participle pussed)

  1. (rare) To emit pus.
    • For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:pus.

Anagrams

  • 'sup, PSU, SUP, Sup., UPS, USP, psu, sup, sup., ups

Albanian

Etymology

Probably borrowed from Latin puteum. Compare Romanian puț, Italian pozzo.

Noun

pus m

  1. well

Synonyms

  • ubël

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpus/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin pūs (early 19th century), meaning the same.

Noun

pus m (uncountable)

  1. pus

Etymology 2

From Old Occitan plus, from Latin plūs, from Old Latin *plous, from Proto-Indo-European *pleh₁-, *pelh₁u- (many). Compare Occitan pus, French plus, Italian più.

Adverb

pus

  1. (archaic) more
  2. (Mallorca) more (in negative sentences)
    no en vull pus
    I don't want more of it

Etymology 3

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin post.

Conjunction

pus

  1. after

References

Further reading

  • “pus” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “pus” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “pus” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpus]
  • Rhymes: -us

Noun

pus

  1. genitive plural of pusa

Anagrams

  • sup

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin pūs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏs/
  • Hyphenation: pus
  • Rhymes: -ʏs

Noun

pus n or m (uncountable)

  1. pus (whitish-yellow bodily substance)
    Synonym: etter

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /py/
  • Homophones: pu, pue, pues, puent, put, pût

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin pus, meaning the same.

Noun

pus m (plural pus)

  1. pus

Etymology 2

See pouvoir

Verb

pus

  1. first-person singular past historic of pouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of pouvoir

Etymology 3

See paître

Verb

pus

  1. (extremely rare) masculine plural past participle of paître

Further reading

  • “pus” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Irish

Etymology

From Middle Irish bus (lip).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pˠʊsˠ/

Noun

pus m (genitive singular puis, nominative plural pusa or pusanna)

  1. (protruding) mouth; sulky expression, pout
  2. (anatomy) snout

Declension

Alternative declension

Synonyms

  • (snout): cab m, glomhar m, gulba f, smaois f, smuilc f, smúrlach f, smut m, soc m, srubh f

Derived terms

  • pusach (pouting, in a huff; whimpering, ready to cry, adjective)
  • pusaire m, pusaí m, pusaíoch m (sulky person; blubberer, whimperer)
  • puslach m (muzzle)

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “4 bus (‘lip’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “pus”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading

  • "pus" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin pūs.

Noun

pus m (invariable)

  1. pus, matter

Related terms


Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *puos, from Proto-Indo-European *púH-os ~ *púH-es-os, from *puH-.

Cognate with Sanskrit पुवस् (púvas), Ancient Greek πῡός (pūós), πύθω (púthō, to rot), Gothic 𐍆𐌿𐌻𐍃 (fuls, foul), Old English fūl (foul), English foul.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /puːs/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /pus/

Noun

pūs n (genitive pūris); third declension

  1. pus
  2. foul, corrupt matter

Declension

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • pus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Lushootseed

Noun

pus

  1. Southern Lushootseed form of ʔəpus.

Miskito

Noun

pus

  1. cat

Norman

Etymology 1

From Old French plus, from Latin.

Adverb

pus

  1. (Jersey) more, -er (used to form comparatives of adjectives)

Noun

pus m (plural pus)

  1. (Jersey, mathematics) plus sign

Etymology 2

Verb

pus

  1. first-person singular preterite of pouver

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʉːs/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

pus m (definite singular pusen, indefinite plural pusar, definite plural pusane)

  1. (informal) cat

Synonyms

  • katt
  • pusekatt, kattepus

References

  • “pus” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Occitan

Alternative forms

  • pu (Mistralian)

Etymology

From Old Occitan plus, from Latin plus.

Adverb

pus

  1. more

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin pūs, from Proto-Indo-European *puH- (to rot, stink).

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈpuʃ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈpus/
  • Hyphenation: pus

Noun

pus m (uncountable)

  1. pus

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈpuʃ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈpu(j)s/

Verb

pus

  1. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of pôr

Romanian

Etymology

Past participle of pune. Probably formed on the basis of the simple perfect, puse, or from a hypothetical earlier form *post, from Latin postus, syncopated form of positus (compare also adăpost, where this was preserved).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pus]

Participle

pus

  1. past participle of pune

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin pūs.

Noun

pus m or f (plural puses)

  1. pus

Turkish

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *bus (steam). Cognate with Tuvan бус (bus, steam), Bashkir боҫ (boθ, steam), Chuvash пӑс (păs, steam), etc.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pus/

Noun

pus (definite accusative pusu, plural puslar)

  1. haze

Declension


Tzotzil

Pronunciation

  • (Zinacantán) IPA(key): /pʰus/

Noun

pus

  1. steam bath

References

  • Laughlin, Robert M. (1975) The Great Tzotzil Dictionary of San Lorenzo Zinacantán. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.

Walloon

Etymology

From Latin plūs, from Proto-Indo-European *plē-, *pelu- (many).

Adverb

pus

  1. more

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a viscous fluid formed in infected tissue.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)