Sum in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does sum mean? Is sum a Scrabble word?

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Is sum a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sum is a Scrabble US word. The word sum is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

S1U1M3

Is sum a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sum is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

S1U1M3

Is sum a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sum is a Words With Friends word. The word sum is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1U2M4

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Valid words made from Sum

You can make 6 words from 'sum' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sum'

MUS 5SUM 5
UMS 5 

2 letters words from 'sum'

MU 4UM 4
US 2 

All 3 letters words made out of sum

sum usm smu msu ums mus

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sum. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sum.

Definitions and meaning of sum

sum

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: sŭm, IPA(key): /sʌm/
  • Rhymes: -ʌm
  • Homophone: some

Etymology 1

From Middle English summe, from Old French summe, from Latin summa, feminine of summus (highest).

Noun

sum (plural sums)

  1. A quantity obtained by addition or aggregation.
    The sum of 3 and 4 is 7.
  2. (often plural) An arithmetic computation, especially one posed to a student as an exercise (not necessarily limited to addition).
    We're learning about division, and the sums are tricky.
    • a large sheet of paper [] covered with long sums
  3. A quantity of money.
    a tidy sum
    the sum of forty pounds
    • With a great sum obtained I this freedom.
  4. A summary; the principal points or thoughts when viewed together; the amount; the substance; compendium.
    This is the sum of all the evidence in the case.
    This is the sum and substance of his objections.
  5. A central idea or point; gist.
  6. The utmost degree.
  7. (obsolete) An old English measure of corn equal to the quarter.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, page 207:
      The sum is also used for the quarter, and the strike for the bushel.
Synonyms
  • (quantity obtained by addition or aggregation): amount, sum total, summation, total, totality
  • (arithmetic computation): calculation, computation
  • (quantity of money): amount, quantity of money, sum of money
  • (summary): See summary
  • (central idea or point): center/centre, core, essence, gist, heart, heart and soul, inwardness, kernel, marrow, meat, nub, nitty-gritty, pith substance
  • (utmost degree): See summit
  • (obsolete: old English measure of corn): quarter
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also
  • addition, summation: (augend) + (addend) = (summand) + (summand) = (sum, total)
  • subtraction: (minuend) − (subtrahend) = (difference)
  • multiplication: (multiplier) × (multiplicand) = (factor) × (factor) = (product)
  • division: (dividend) ÷ (divisor) = (quotient), remainder left over if divisor does not divide dividend

Verb

sum (third-person singular simple present sums, present participle summing, simple past and past participle summed)

  1. (transitive) To add together.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 250b.
      when you say that stability and change are, it's because you're summing them up together as embraced by it, and taking note of the communion each of them has with being.
  2. (transitive) To give a summary of.
Synonyms
  • (to add together): add, add together, add up, sum up, summate, tally, tot, tot up, total, tote up
  • (to give a summary of): See summarize
Translations

References

  • sum on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Kazakh сом (som), Kyrgyz сом (som), Uyghur سوم(som), and Uzbek soʻm, all of which have the core signification “pure”, used in elliptical reference to historical coins of pure gold.

Alternative forms

  • som, soum

Noun

sum (plural sums)

  1. The basic unit of money in Kyrgyzstan.
  2. The basic unit of money in Uzbekistan.
Translations

Etymology 3

Eye dialect spelling of some.

Pronoun

sum

  1. (African-American Vernacular, Internet slang, text messaging) Eye dialect spelling of some.

Determiner

sum

  1. (African-American Vernacular, Internet slang, text messaging) Eye dialect spelling of some.

Etymology 4

Noun

sum (plural sums)

  1. Synonym of somon

Further reading

  • sum in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sum in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911.
  • sum at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • MSU, Mus, Muş, UMS, mu's, mus, mus', ums

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • sun, su

Etymology

From Latin subtus, from sub. Compare Romanian sub.

Preposition

sum

  1. under

Czech

Etymology 1

Noun

sum

  1. genitive plural of suma

Etymology 2

Noun

sum

  1. genitive plural of sumo

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse sem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sʊmː/
  • Rhymes: -ʊmː

Conjunction

sum

  1. like, as
  2. when, as

Particle

sum (relative particle)

  1. that, who, which

Synonyms


Gothic

Romanization

sum

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌿𐌼

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʏːm

Adjective

sum

  1. inflection of sumur (some):
    1. nominative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative neuter plural

Kavalan

Noun

sum

  1. urine

Latin

Etymology

The present stem is from Proto-Italic *ezom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist). Cognates include Ancient Greek εἰμί (eimí), Sanskrit अस्मि (ásmi), Old English eom (English am). The perfect stem is from Proto-Italic *(fe)fūai, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰúHt (to become, be) (whence also fīō (to become, to be made), and future and imperfect inflections -bō, -bam). Confer also the etymology at fore.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /sum/, [sʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /sum/

Verb

sum (present infinitive esse, perfect active fuī, future participle futūrus); irregular conjugation, irregular, no passive, no supine stem except in the future active participle

  1. (copulative) to be, exist, have [+dative]
    • Heauton Timorumenos (“The Self-Tormentor”) by Publius Terentius Afer
      Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto.
      I am a man, I consider nothing that is human alien to me.
    • René Descartes
      Cogito, ergo sum.
      I think, therefore I am.
    • 63 B.C.E., Cicero, Catiline Orations (Latin text and English translations here)
      O di immortales, ubinam gentium sumus? Quam rem publicam habemus? In qua urbe vivimus?.
      O ye immortal gods, where on earth are we? What is the government we have? In what city do we live?
    • 121 CE, Suetonius, De vita Caesarum ("About the Life of the Caesars", commonly referred to as "The Twelve Caesars")
      Alea iacta est.
      The die is cast.
  2. to be there (impersonal verb)
  3. (Medieval Latin, in the past tense) to go
    • Ad quod castrum vincendum Pisani fuerunt cum quinquaginta navibus, plattis et schafis, etc,
      They went to conquer Pisanius' castle with fifty boats, engines, siege weapons, etc.

Conjugation

In Vulgar Latin, the present infinitive was changed to have the -re ending: essere.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Aromanian: escu (in part)
  • Asturian: ser (in part)
  • Corsican: esse
  • Dalmatian: saite
  • Franco-Provençal: étre (< *estre < *essre), ésse (contraction of *essre)
  • Friulian: jessi, sei
  • Istriot: ièsi
  • Italian: essere
  • Megleno-Romanian: săm
  • Mirandese: ser (in part)
  • Ladin: ester, esser, esse
  • Ligurian: êse
  • Neapolitan: éssere
  • Old French: estre
    • Middle French: estre (conflated with ester)
      • French: être
      • Bourguignon: étre
      • Champenois: ètre
      • Franc-Comtois: étre
      • Gallo: ête
      • Picard: ète
      • Norman: ête
      • Walloon: esse
  • Old Portuguese: seer (in part)
    • Galician: ser
    • Portuguese: ser
  • Old Occitan: esser
    • Catalan: ésser, ser
    • Occitan: èsser, èstre
  • Piedmontese: esse
  • Romanian: fi (in part)
  • Romansch: esser, easser
  • Sardinian: èssere, èssi, èssiri
  • Sicilian: èssiri, siri
  • Spanish: ser (in part)
  • Venetian: èser, èsar, èsare, esare, èsere, èssare, èssere

Further reading

  • sum¹ in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • 1 sum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, pages 1,511–1,512
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • sum in D. P. Simpson, Cassell's Latin Dictionary, Wiley Publishing, 1968
  • sum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Latin summa

Noun

sum m (definite singular summen, indefinite plural summer, definite plural summene)

  1. a sum (addition or aggregation)
    Hva er summen av 2+2?
    What's the sum of 2+2?
  2. a sum (amount of money)
Derived terms
  • leiesum
  • pengesum

Etymology 2

From the verb summe

Noun

sum n (definite singular summet)

  1. buzz (continuous noise)

Etymology 3

Verb

sum

  1. imperative of summe

References

  • “sum” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Latin summa

Noun

sum m (definite singular summen, indefinite plural summar, definite plural summane)

  1. a sum (addition or aggregation)
    Kva er summen av 2+2?
    What's the sum of 2+2?
  2. a sum (amount of money)
Derived terms
  • pengesum

Etymology 2

From the verb summe

Noun

sum n (definite singular summet)

  1. buzz (continuous noise)

Etymology 3

Noun

sum n (definite singular sumet, indefinite plural sum, definite plural suma)

  1. an act of swimming
    Dei la på sum utover mot holmen.
    They started swimming towards the holm.

Etymology 4

Pronoun

sum m (feminine sum, neuter sumt, plural sume)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by som

References

  • “sum” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sumaz, whence also Old High German sum, Old Norse sumr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sum/

Pronoun

sum

  1. some

Descendants

  • Middle English: sum, som, some
    • Scots: sum, some
    • English: some

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sumaz, whence also Old English sum, Old Norse sumr

Pronoun

sum n

  1. some

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: som
    • Low German: sum

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sum/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *somъ.

Noun

sum m anim

  1. European catfish
Declension

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun

sum f pl

  1. genitive plural of suma

Further reading

  • sum in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sum in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Shabo

Verb

sum

  1. say

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /súːm/

Noun

sȗm m inan

  1. suspicion, mistrust

Inflection

Further reading

  • sum”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Vurës

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sym/

Verb

sum

  1. to drink

Source: wiktionary.org
  • humid and oppressive.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)