Wo in Scrabble Dictionary

What does wo mean? Is wo a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is wo worth? wo how many points in Words With Friends? What does wo mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for wo

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Is wo a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word wo is a Scrabble US word. The word wo is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

W4O1

Is wo a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word wo is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

W4O1

Is wo a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word wo is a Words With Friends word. The word wo is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

W4O1

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Valid words made from Wo

You can make 2 words from 'wo' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


2 letters words from 'wo'

OW 5WO 5

Definitions and meaning of wo

wo

Alternative forms

  • whoa

Etymology 1

Variant of who.

Interjection

wo

  1. A falconer's call to a hawk.
  2. A call to cause a horse to slow down or stop; whoa.

Etymology 2

Variant of woe.

Noun

wo (countable and uncountable, plural wos)

  1. Obsolete spelling of woe
    • 1815, Philip Freneau, A collection of poems, on American affairs and a variety of other subjects, page 82[1]:
      Such feeble arms, to work internal wo!
    • 1809, Hannah More, Coelebs in Search of a Wife
      But if there was a competition between a sick family and a new broach, the broach was sure to carry the day. This would not have been the case, had they been habituated to visit themselves the abodes of penury and wo.

Etymology 3

From Middle English wough, woh, wouh, from Old English wāh, wāg (a wall, partition), from Proto-Germanic *waigaz (wall), from Proto-Indo-European *weyk- (to bend, twist). Cognate with Scots wauch, vauch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wo/, /wɔː/

Alternative forms

  • waw (Northern England, Scotland)
  • waugh (Scotland)

Noun

wo (plural wos)

  1. (Northern England, Derbyshire, dialectal) A wall.
    • 1859, Thomas Moore, The Song of Solomon in the Durham Dialect, ii. 9:
      He stands ahint our wo.
    • 1871, Benjamin Brierly, Weaver of Wellbrook, in Folk-song and Folk-speech of Lancashire (ed. William-Edward-Armitage Axon), page 53:
      Yo may turn up yor noses at me an' th' owd dame,
      An thrutch us like dogs agen th' wo :
      Bo as lung 's aw con nayger, aw'll ne'er be a beggar,
      So aw care no a cuss for yo o-o'.
    • 1880, Thomas Clarke, Specimens of the Dialect of Westmorland, page 41:
      [] thinkan it ran at him, thrast him up again t' wo, ramm't at him, []
    • 1884, Jack Robison, Aald Tales ower Agen, 4:
      Plantit up agen t'wo
    • 1936, G. Halstead Whittaker, A Lancashire Garland of Dialect Prose and Verse, page 221:
      Hoo's pluck of a lion an' faces her foe
      Wi' calm in her e'en an' her beck agen t' wo;
      Hoo's firm i' decision, stonds up for her reets
      An' bravely withstonds o' t' misfortins hoo meets.

Verb

wo

  1. (Northern England, dialectal, possibly obsolete) To wall (to build a wall, or build a wall around).
    • 1871, John Richardson, "Cummerland Talk": Being Short Tales and Rhymes, page 101:
      [] “Theer was anudder time, teu, 'at I saw t Park Boggle, in anudder form; bit I wassent seah nart that time, as I was when I'd been fetchen t hogs. I'd been wo-en a gap 'at hed fawn ower o' tudder side o' to Park; []
    • 1880, Thomas Clarke, Specimens of the Dialect of Westmorland, page 2:
      It's a varra lang while—a caant tell ya hoo lang—sen it wes bilt, lang afooar Borradal fooak woet kucku in, er t' first cooach ran throo Dent, []

Anagrams

  • 'ow, ow

Acehnese

Verb

wo

  1. to go home

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Akan

Pronoun

wo

  1. thou, you (singular)

Dongxiang

Etymology

Compare Bonan wa, perhaps from Proto-Mongolic *bü- (to be), see Mongolian бий (bij).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wo/, [wo]

Verb

wo (defective, copulative)

  1. to be
    1. existential copula
    2. equitive copula
    3. adjectival copula
  2. in possessive constructions with the possessor in dative
  3. (after -zhi) forming the progressive tense

Usage notes

  • Usually combined with the Chinese copula shi which is placed between two terms while wo follows the second. Either of them or even both can be omitted but both being present is usually the most common setup.

Synonyms

  • shi
  • wei
  • enbe

Antonyms

  • pushi
  • u

Derived terms

  • -zho - contraction of -zhi wo.

Ewe

Pronoun

wo

  1. them
  2. they

German

Etymology

With a widespread dialectal shift from -ā- to -ō-, from Middle High German , wār, from Old High German wār, hwār, from Proto-Germanic *hwēr, *hwar. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis, whence also wer. Cognate with English where.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /voː/
  • Rhymes: -oː

Adverb

wo

  1. (interrogative) where (at what place)
  2. (relative) where (at or in which place or situation)
  3. (relative, somewhat informal) when, that (on which; at which time)
  4. (indefinite, colloquial) somewhere (in or to an uncertain or unspecified location)

Usage notes

  • The temporal use of wo (meaning “when”) is sometimes frowned upon in formal standard German. There is a tendency to use a preposition + relative pronoun instead: Das war der Tag, an dem wir uns kennen gelernt haben. (“That was the day on which we got to know each other.”) Nevertheless, this usage is very common in spoken German and is also widely acceptable in writing, particularly after adverbs, where the only alternative would be the archaic da: Jetzt, wo ich es weiß, wird mir alles klar. (“Now that I know, it all becomes clear to me.”) Compare French (where), the temporal use of which is perfectly standard.

Conjunction

wo

  1. (colloquial) when
    Wo ich mich umgedreht hab, haut der mir unvermittelt eine rein.
    When I turned around, he just abruptly punched me in the face.

Usage notes

  • This usage is exclusively colloquial and would be considered inappropriate in a formal text.

Synonyms

  • als

Pronoun

wo

  1. (relative, dialectal, nonstandard) who, whom, which, that
    • 1979, Margret Weiler, Zur Frage der Integration der Zigeuner in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland: eine Untersuchung der gegenwärtigen Situation der Zigeuner und der sozialpolitischen und sozialarbeiterischen Massnahmen für Zigeuner, self-published doctoral thesis, p. 188
      Aber daß sie sich da mit uns unterhalten, das tun die nicht, mal grad die wo wir mal kennen, das ist eine Familie (...)
      But that they should have a chat with us, they don't do that, just maybe those who we know a bit, that's one family (...)
    • 1994, Burkhard Hergesell, Arbeiterkulturen im Betrieb: interethnische Beziehungen zwischen Produktionsarbeitern: eine empirische Studie, IKO Verlag für Interkulturelle Kommunikation, p. 133
      Ali: "Und der Hussein, der ist ein Typ, wo / wo doch nicht Türkisch redet. Der redet nur Deutsch mit mir. (...)"
      Ali: "And Hussein, he's a bloke who / who won't speak Turkish. He only talks German to me. (...)"
    • 2009, Elfriede Jelinek, Die Kontrakte des Kaufmanns. Rechnitz (Der Würgeengel). Über Tiere. – Drei Romane, Rowohlt Taschenbuch, p. 216
      Ich bin, der ich bin. Ich bin, wo ich bin. Ich bin der, wo ich bin. Wo sagt man sowas?
      I am who I am. I am where I am. I am the one that I am. Where do they say it like this?

Usage notes

  • This use is restricted to dialectally influenced vernaculars (Regiolekte) and chiefly to Alemannic areas (Switzerland and south-western Germany). In other regions, this usage is unusual, and scorned by some.

Related terms

  • woanders, wobei

German Low German

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German (how), from Old Saxon [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *hwō. Cognate with English how, German wie, Dutch hoe.

Alternative forms

  • (in some dialects) woans

Pronunciation

  • (in some dialects) IPA(key): /vɔu̯/
  • (traditional) IPA(key): [wɔʊ̯]

Adverb

wo

  1. how

Etymology 2

From Old Saxon hwē, from Proto-Germanic *hwaz. Compare English who, whom, whose.

Pronoun

wo

  1. (Low Prussian, relative) who, which
    (Low Prussian)

Usage notes

The dative form (also used for the accusative) is woom (wom); the genitive form is woos (wos).


Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French haut (high).

Adjective

wo

  1. high
  2. tall

Adverb

wo

  1. high

Related terms

  • wotè

Hunsrik

Etymology

From Middle High German , wār, from Old High German wār, hwār, from Proto-Germanic *hwēr, *hwar.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /voː/

Adverb

wo

  1. (interrogative) where
  2. (relative) where
  3. (relative) when

Pronoun

wo

  1. (relative) who

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Japanese

Romanization

wo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of
  3. Rōmaji transcription of うぉ
  4. Rōmaji transcription of ウォ

Lashi

Etymology

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *r/g-wa. Cognate to Burmese ရွာ (rwa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wo/

Noun

wo

  1. village

References

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis).

Lower Sorbian

Preposition

wo

  1. Superseded spelling of .

Luxembourgish

Verb

wo

  1. second-person singular imperative of woen

Mandarin

Romanization

wo (Zhuyin ˙ㄨㄛ)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle English

Noun

wo (plural wos)

  1. Alternative form of woo

Saterland Frisian

Adverb

wo

  1. how, to what degree

Xhosa

Pronoun

-wo

  1. Combining stem of wona.

Zulu

Pronoun

-wo

  1. Combining stem of wona.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • the windpipe.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)