Art in Scrabble Dictionary

What does art mean? Is art a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is art worth? art how many points in Words With Friends? What does art mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for art

See how to calculate how many points for art.

Is art a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word art is a Scrabble US word. The word art is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

A1R1T1

Is art a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word art is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

A1R1T1

Is art a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word art is a Words With Friends word. The word art is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1R1T1

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Valid words made from Art

You can make 6 words from 'art' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'art'

ART 3RAT 3
TAR 3 

2 letters words from 'art'

AR 2AT 2
TA 2 

All 3 letters words made out of art

art rat atr tar rta tra

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word art. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in art.

Definitions and meaning of art

art

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɑːt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɑɹt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t
  • Hyphenation: art

Etymology 1

From Middle English art, from Old French art, from Latin artem, accusative of ars (art). Displaced native Middle English liste (art) (from Old English list).

Noun

art (countable and uncountable, plural arts)

Wikiquote

Wikisource

Wikibooks

  1. (uncountable) The conscious production or arrangement of sounds, colours, forms, movements, or other elements in a manner that affects the senses and emotions, usually specifically the production of the beautiful in a graphic or plastic medium.
    • 1992 May 3, "Comrade Bingo" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 3, Episode 6:
      B.W. Wooster: If you ask me, art is responsible for most of the trouble in the world.
      R. Jeeves: An interesting theory, sir. Would you care to expatiate upon it?
      B.W. Wooster: As a matter of fact, no, Jeeves. The thought just occurred to me, as thoughts do.
      R. Jeeves: Very good, sir.
    • 2005 July, Lynn Freed, Harper's:
      "I tell her what Donald Hall says: that the problem with workshops is that they trivialize art by minimizing the terror."
    • 2009, Alexander Brouwer:
      Visual art is a subjective understanding or perception of the viewer as well as a deliberate/conscious arrangement or creation of elements like colours, forms, movements, sounds, objects or other elements that produce a graphic or plastic whole that expresses thoughts, ideas or visions of the artist.
  2. (uncountable) The creative and emotional expression of mental imagery, such as visual, auditory, social, etc.
  3. (countable) Skillful creative activity, usually with an aesthetic focus.
  4. (uncountable) The study and the product of these processes.
  5. (uncountable) Aesthetic value.
  6. (uncountable) Artwork.
  7. (countable) A field or category of art, such as painting, sculpture, music, ballet, or literature.
  8. (countable) A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
  9. (countable) Skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation.
    • 1796, Matthew Lewis, The Monk, Folio Society 1985, page 217:
      A physician was immediately sent for; but on the first moment of beholding the corpse, he declared that Elvira's recovery was beyond the power of art.
  10. (uncountable, dated) Contrivance, scheming, manipulation.
Synonyms
  • (Human effort): craft
Antonyms
  • (Human effort): mundacity, nature, subsistence
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • Pages starting with "art".
  • Descendants
    • Jamaican Creole: aat
    • Tok Pisin: at
    • Japanese: アート (āto)
    Translations

    Etymology 2

    From Middle English art, from Old English eart ((thou) art), second-person singular present indicative of wesan, from Proto-Germanic *ar-t ((thou) art", originally, "(thou) becamest), second-person singular preterite indicative form of *iraną (to rise, be quick, become active), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)- (to lift, rise, set in motion). Cognate with Faroese ert (art), Icelandic ert (art), Old English earon (are), from the same preterite-present Germanic verb. More at are.

    Verb

    art

    1. (archaic) second-person singular simple present form of be

    See also

    References

    • art on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
    • art at OneLook Dictionary Search
    • "art" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 40.
    • art in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
    • art in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

    Anagrams

    • 'rat, ATR, RAT, RTA, Rat, Tar, rat, tar

    Albanian

    Etymology

    Learned borrowing from Latin ars, artem.

    Noun

    art m (definite singular arti)

    1. art

    Declension

    Synonyms

    • zeje

    Catalan

    Etymology

    From Latin ars.

    Pronunciation

    • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈaɾt/
    • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈart/

    Noun

    art m or f (plural arts)

    1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

    Derived terms

    • belles arts
    • obra d'art

    Related terms

    • artista
    • artístic

    Further reading

    • “art” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
    • “art” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
    • “art” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
    • “art” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

    Cornish

    Etymology

    From Latin ars (art).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ɒɹt]

    Noun

    art m (plural artys)

    1. art

    Crimean Tatar

    Noun

    art

    1. back
      Synonyms: arqa, sırt

    Danish

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German art.

    Noun

    art c (singular definite arten, plural indefinite arter)

    1. kind
    2. nature
    3. species

    Inflection


    French

    Etymology

    From Latin artem, accusative singular of ars.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /aʁ/

    Noun

    art m (plural arts)

    1. art (something pleasing to the mind)

    Derived terms

    • beaux-arts
    • neuvième art

    Related terms

    • artifice
    • artificiel
    • artisan
    • artiste

    Descendants

    • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)

    Further reading

    • “art” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Anagrams

    • rat

    Irish

    Etymology

    From Old Irish art, explained in glossaries as “stone”.

    Noun

    art m (genitive singular airt, nominative plural airt)

    1. stone

    Declension

    Derived terms

    • chomh marbh le hart (stone dead)

    Mutation

    Further reading

    • "art" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
    • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “art”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

    Latvian

    Etymology

    From Proto-Baltic [Term?], from Proto-Indo-European *ar-, *arə-, *h₂erh₃- (to plow), from *h₁er- (sparse; to crumble, to fall to pieces), whence also the verb irt (q.v.). Cognates include Lithuanian árti, Old Prussian artoys (plowman) (compare Lithuanian artójas), Old Church Slavonic орати (orati), Russian dialectal or dated ора́ть (orátʹ), Belarusian ара́ць (arácʹ), Ukrainian ора́ти (oráty), Bulgarian ора́ (orá), Czech orati, Polish orać, Gothic 𐌰𐍂𐌾𐌰𐌽 (arjan), Old Norse erja, Hittite [Term?] (/ẖarra-/, to crush; (passive form) to disappear), [Term?] (/ẖarš-/, to tear open; to plow), Ancient Greek ἀρόω (aróō), Latin arō.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [âɾt]

    Verb

    art tr., 1st conj., pres. aru, ar, ar, past aru

    1. to plow (to prepare (land) for sowing by using a plow)

    Conjugation

    Derived terms

    Related terms

    References


    Maltese

    Etymology

    From Arabic أَرْض(ʾarḍ).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /art/
    • IPA(key): /aːrt/ (variant, as if spelt *għart)

    Noun

    art f (plural artijiet)

    1. earth (our planet)
      Synonym: dinja
    2. ground; soil

    Middle English

    Etymology 1

    From Old English eart, second person singular of wesan (to be), from Proto-Germanic *art, second person singular of *iraną.

    Alternative forms

    • eart, ert

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /art/

    Verb

    art

    1. Second-person singular present indicative form of been
    Usage notes

    This form is more common than bist for the second-person singular.

    Descendants
    • English: art (archaic, dialectal)

    Etymology 2

    Borrowed from Old French art, from Latin artem, accusative form of ars, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂r̥tís.

    Alternative forms

    • aart, arte

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /art/

    Noun

    art (plural artes or ars)

    1. A member of the seven medieval liberal arts (the trivium and quadrivium).
    2. The seven medieval liberal arts as a group; the trivium and quadrivium combined.
    3. The foundational knowledge and activities of a field or subject (either academic or trade).
    4. Applied or practical knowledge; the execution or realisation of knowledge.
    5. Guile, craft or an instance of it; the use of deception or sleight-of hand.
    6. Competency, skill; one's aptitude or ability in a given area or at a given task.
    7. A set of rules or guidelines for conducting oneself; a code of conduct.
    8. (rare) Knowledge, information; the set of things which one has learned about (through formal study).
    9. (rare) Rhetoric; skill in oration, argument, speech, or speaking.
    10. (rare) Human behaviour or action (as opposed to natural happenings).
    Descendants
    • English: art
    • Scots: airt
    References
    • “art, n.(1).” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Etymology 3

    From Old English eard, from Proto-Germanic *ardiz (nature; type). Doublet of erd (nature, disposition).

    Noun

    art

    1. (Northern) district, locality
    Descendants
    • Scots: airt

    References

    • “art, n.(2).” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Middle French

    Noun

    art m (plural ars)

    1. art

    Descendants

    • French: art
      • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)

    Norwegian Bokmål

    Noun

    art f or m (definite singular arta or arten, indefinite plural arter, definite plural artene)

    1. character, nature, kind
    2. (biology) a species

    Derived terms

    References

    • “art” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Noun

    art m or f (definite singular arten or arta, indefinite plural artar or arter, definite plural artane or artene)

    1. (biology) a species

    Derived terms

    References

    • “art” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

    Occitan

    Etymology

    From Latin ars.

    Noun

    art m (plural arts)

    1. art

    Related terms

    • artista

    Old French

    Etymology

    From Latin artem, accusative of ars.

    Noun

    art m or f (oblique plural arz or artz, nominative singular arz or artz, nominative plural art)

    1. art (skill; practice; method)
      • Walter of Bibbesworth: Le Tretiz, ed. W. Rothwell, ANTS Plain Texts Series 6, 1990. Date of cited text: circa 1250
        ore serroit a saver de l’art a bresser & brasyr
        Now would be the time to know the art of brewing

    Descendants

    • Middle French: art
      • French: art
        • Haitian Creole: la (< l'art)
    • Norman: art
    • Walloon: årt
    • Middle English: art
      • English: art
        • Jamaican Creole: aat
        • Tok Pisin: at
        • Japanese: アート (āto)
      • Scots: airt

    References

    • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (art, supplement)
    • art on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub
    • “art” in le Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Old Irish

    Etymology

    From Proto-Celtic *artos (bear) (compare Cornish arth, Welsh arth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ŕ̥tḱos (bear).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ar͈t/

    Noun

    art m

    1. bear
      Synonym: mathgamain

    Inflection

    Mutation


    Swedish

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    art c

    1. species

    Declension

    Anagrams

    • tar

    Turkish

    Etymology

    From Proto-Turkic *hārt (back). Cognate with Turkish arka.

    Noun

    art (definite accusative artı, plural artlar)

    1. back

    Declension


    Source: wiktionary.org
    • works of creative imagination.
      (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)