Face in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does face mean? Is face a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is face worth? face how many points in Words With Friends? What does face mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for face

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Is face a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word face is a Scrabble US word. The word face is worth 9 points in Scrabble:

F4A1C3E1

Is face a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word face is a Scrabble UK word and has 9 points:

F4A1C3E1

Is face a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word face is a Words With Friends word. The word face is worth 10 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

F4A1C4E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Face

You can make 11 words from 'face' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'face'

CAFE 9FACE 9

3 letters words from 'face'

ACE 5CAF 8
FAE 6 

2 letters words from 'face'

AE 2EA 2
EF 5FA 5
FE 5 

All 4 letters words made out of face

face afce fcae cfae acfe cafe faec afec feac efac aefc eafc fcea cfea feca efca cefa ecfa acef caef aecf eacf ceaf ecaf

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word face. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in face.

Definitions and meaning of face

face

Etymology

From Middle English face, from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (form, appearance), from facere (to make, do).

Displaced native Middle English onlete (face, countenance, appearance), anleth (face), from Old English anwlite, andwlita, compare German Antlitz; Old English ansīen (face), Middle English neb (face, nose) (from Old English nebb), Middle English ler, leor, leer (face, cheek, countenance) (from Old English hlēor), and non-native Middle English vis (face, appearance, look) (from Old French vis) and Middle English chere (face) from Old French chere.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fās, IPA(key): /feɪs/
  • Hyphenation: face
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) The front part of the head of a human or other animal, featuring the eyes, nose and mouth, and the surrounding area.
  2. One's facial expression.
  3. (in expressions such as 'make a face') A distorted facial expression; an expression of displeasure, insult, etc.
    Children! Stop making faces at each other!
  4. The public image; outward appearance.
  5. The frontal aspect of something.
  6. An aspect of the character or nature of someone or something.
    This is a face of her that we have not seen before.
    Poverty is the ugly face of capitalism.
  7. (figurative) Presence; sight; front.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. Like a bat he chose the night hours for his work of rapine; like a bat he struck and vanished, pouncingly, noiselessly; like a bat he never showed himself to the face of the day.
  8. The directed force of something.
  9. Good reputation; standing in the eyes of others; dignity; prestige. (See lose face, save face).
  10. Shameless confidence; boldness; effrontery.
    You've got some face coming round here after what you've done.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, Preface to The Works
      This is the man that has the face to charge others with false citations.
  11. Any surface, especially a front or outer one.
  12. (geometry) Any of the flat bounding surfaces of a polyhedron. More generally, any of the bounding pieces of a polytope of any dimension.
  13. The numbered dial of a clock or watch, the clock face.
  14. (slang) The mouth.
  15. (slang) Makeup; one's complete facial cosmetic application.
  16. (metonymically) A person.
    It was just the usual faces at the pub tonight.
  17. (informal) A familiar or well-known person; a member of a particular scene, such as music or fashion scene.
  18. (professional wrestling, slang) A headlining wrestler with a persona embodying heroic or virtuous traits and who is regarded as a "good guy", especially one who is handsome and well-conditioned; a baby face.
  19. (cricket) The front surface of a bat.
  20. (golf) The part of a golf club that hits the ball.
  21. (card games) The side of the card that shows its value (as opposed to the back side, which looks the same on all cards of the deck).
  22. (heraldry) The head of a lion, shown face-on and cut off immediately behind the ears.
  23. The width of a pulley, or the length of a cog from end to end.
  24. (typography) A typeface.
  25. Mode of regard, whether favourable or unfavourable; favour or anger.
  26. (informal) The amount expressed on a bill, note, bond, etc., without any interest or discount; face value.

Synonyms

  • (part of head): countenance, visage, phiz (obsolete), phizog (obsolete), see also Thesaurus:countenance
  • (facial expression): countenance, expression, facial expression, look, visage, see also Thesaurus:facial expression
  • (the front or outer surface): foreside
  • (public image): image, public image, reputation
  • (of a polyhedron): facet (different specialised meaning in mathematical use), surface (not in mathematical use)
  • (slang: mouth): cakehole, gob, mush, piehole, trap, see also Thesaurus:mouth
  • (slang: wrestling): good guy, hero

Antonyms

  • (baby face): heel

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Danish: fjæs
  • Norwegian: fjes
  • Swedish: fjäs

Translations

See face/translations § Noun.

Verb

face (third-person singular simple present faces, present participle facing, simple past and past participle faced)

  1. (transitive, of a person or animal) To position oneself or itself so as to have one's face closest to (something).
    • Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
  2. (transitive, of an object) To have its front closest to, or in the direction of (something else).
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to turn or present a face or front, as in a particular direction.
    • 1963, Ian Fleming, On Her Majesty's Secret Service
      The croupier delicately faced her other two cards with the tip of his spatula. A four! She had lost!
  4. (transitive) To be presented or confronted with; to have in prospect.
    We are facing an uncertain future.
  5. (transitive) To deal with (a difficult situation or person); to accept (facts, reality, etc.) even when undesirable.
    • 1681, John Dryden, The Spanish Fryar
      I'll face / This tempest, and deserve the name of king.
  6. (intransitive) To have the front in a certain direction.
  7. (transitive) To have as an opponent.
    Puddletown United face Mudchester Rovers in the quarter-finals.
  8. (intransitive, cricket) To be the batsman on strike.
    Willoughby comes in to bowl, and it's Hobson facing.
  9. (transitive, obsolete) To confront impudently; to bully.
  10. (transitive) To cover in front, for ornament, protection, etc.; to put a facing upon.
  11. (transitive) To line near the edge, especially with a different material.
  12. To cover with better, or better appearing, material than the mass consists of, for purpose of deception, as the surface of a box of tea, a barrel of sugar, etc.
  13. (engineering) To make the surface of (anything) flat or smooth; to dress the face of (a stone, a casting, etc.); especially, in turning, to shape or smooth the flat surface of, as distinguished from the cylindrical surface.
  14. (transitive, retail) To arrange the products in (a store) so that they are tidy and attractive.
    In my first job, I learned how to operate a till and to face the store to high standards.

Synonyms

  • (position oneself/itself towards):
  • (have its front closest to):
  • (deal with): confront, deal with

Hyponyms

  • lose face
  • save face
  • suck face

Derived terms

  • in-your-face

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • Face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (geometry) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (hieroglyph) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (mining) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Face (sociological concept) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Further reading

  • MathWorld article on geometrical faces
  • Faces in programming
  • JavaServer Faces
  • face on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

References

  • face on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • CAFE, cafe, café

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌˈħe/

Verb

facé

  1. (transitive) to boil

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[4], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

French

Etymology

From Middle French and Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fas/
  • Homophones: faces, fasce, fasse, fassent, fasses
  • Rhymes: -as

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
  2. surface, side
  3. (geometry) face
  4. head (of a coin)

Derived terms

  • face à
  • en face de
  • faire face à
  • pile ou face

See also

  • aspect
  • figure
  • surface
  • tête
  • visage

Further reading

  • “face” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • café

Friulian

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (plural facis)

  1. face

Interlingua

Verb

face

  1. present of facer
  2. imperative of facer

Italian

Verb

face

  1. (archaic) third-person singular indicative present of fare

Latin

Noun

face

  1. ablative singular of fax

Verb

face

  1. second-person singular present imperative active of faciō

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French face, from Vulgar Latin *facia, from Classical Latin faciēs.

Noun

face (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • 14th C., Chaucer, General Prologue
      Boold was hir face, and fair, and reed of hewe.
      Bold was her face, and fair, and red of hue.
Synonyms
  • visage
Descendants
  • English: face
    • Danish: fjæs
    • Norwegian: fjes
    • Swedish: fjäs
    • Northumbrian: fyess
  • Scots: face

Etymology 2

From Old English fæs.

Noun

face

  1. Alternative form of fass

Old French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *facia, from Latin faciēs (face, shape).

Noun

face f (oblique plural faces, nominative singular face, nominative plural faces)

  1. (anatomy) face
    • c. 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      Le chief li desarme et la face.
      He exposed his head and his face.

Synonyms

  • vis (more common)
  • visage
  • volt

Descendants

  • Middle French: face
    • French: face
  • Norman: fache, fach
  • Middle English: face
    • English: face
      • Danish: fjæs
      • Norwegian: fjes
      • Swedish: fjäs
      • Northumbrian: fyess
    • Scots: face

Portuguese

Etymology

From Old Portuguese façe, faz, from Latin faciēs.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfa.sɨ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfa.si/
  • Hyphenation: fa‧ce

Noun

face f (plural faces)

  1. (anatomy, geometry) face
    Synonyms: cara, rosto
  2. (anatomy) the cheek
    Synonym: bochecha

References

  • “façe” in Dicionario de dicionarios do galego medieval.

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō, from Proto-Italic *fakiō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to put, place, set). The verb's original past participle was fapt, from factum, but was changed and replaced several centuries ago. An alternative third-person simple perfect, fece, from fecit, was also found in some dialects.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfat͡ʃe]

Verb

a face (third-person singular present face, past participle făcut3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) do, make
  2. (reflexive) to be made, to be done

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • afacere
  • facere
  • făcător

Related terms

  • desface
  • fapt

See also

  • înfăptui
  • face dragoste

References

  • face in DEX online - Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • (Castilian) IPA(key): /ˈfaθe/
  • (Latin America) IPA(key): /ˈfase/

Verb

face

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of facer.
  2. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of facer.
  3. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of facer.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to confront.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)