For in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does for mean? Is for a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is for worth? for how many points in Words With Friends? What does for mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for for

See how to calculate how many points for for.

Is for a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word for is a Scrabble US word. The word for is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

F4O1R1

Is for a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word for is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

F4O1R1

Is for a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word for is a Words With Friends word. The word for is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

F4O1R1

Our tools

Valid words made from For

You can make 5 words from 'for' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'for'

FOR 6FRO 6
ORF 6 

2 letters words from 'for'

OF 5OR 2

All 3 letters words made out of for

for ofr fro rfo orf rof

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word for. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in for.

Definitions and meaning of for

for

Etymology

From Middle English for, from Old English for (for, on account of, for the sake of, through, because of, owing to, from, by reason of, as to, in order to), from Proto-Germanic *furi (for), from Proto-Indo-European *preh₂-.

Cognate with West Frisian foar (for), Dutch voor (for), German für (for), Danish for (for), Swedish för (for), Norwegian for (for), Icelandic fyrir (for), Latin per (by, through, for, by means of) and Romance language successors (e.g. Spanish para (for)), Ancient Greek περί (perí, for, about, toward), Lithuanian per (by, through, during), Sanskrit परि (pári, over, around).

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) enPR: fôr
    • (UK) IPA(key): /fɔː(ɹ)/
    • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /fɔɹ/
    • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /foː(ɹ)/
    • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • (unstressed) enPR: fər
    • (UK, General Australian) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ)/
    • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /fɘ(ɹ)/
    • (US, Canada) IPA(key): /fɚ/, IPA(key): /fə/
  • Homophones: fore (with horse-hoarse merger), four (with horse-hoarse merger)

Conjunction

for

  1. (literary) Because, as, since.
    I had to stay with my wicked stepmother, for I had nowhere else to go.

Synonyms

  • given that, seeing that; see also Thesaurus:because

Translations

Preposition

for

  1. Towards; in the direction of.
  2. Directed at; intended to belong to.
  3. In order to help, benefit, gratify, honor etc. (someone or something).
  4. To be used or treated in a stated way, or with a stated purpose.
  5. Supporting, in favour of; (Should we delete(+) this sense?): wanting
    Antonym: against
  6. Because of.
    • 1864, George Etell Sargent, The Story of a City Arab (page 313)
      I could not see his hands, for the thick gloves he wore, and his face was partially concealed by a red woollen comforter; but his entire appearance and manners tallied with what I had seen of Yorkshire farmerhood.
  7. Intended to cure, remove or counteract; in order to cure, remove or counteract.
  8. Over (a period of time).
    • 1717, Joseph Addison, Metamorphoses
      To guide the sun's bright chariot for a day.
  9. Throughout or across (a distance in space).
  10. Used to introduce a subject within a to-infinitive clause.
  11. On behalf of.
  12. In the role or capacity of; instead of; in place of.
  13. In exchange for; in correspondence or equivalence with.
  14. In order to obtain or acquire.
  15. By the standards of, usually with the implication of those standards being lower than one might otherwise expect.
  16. To be, or as being.
    • 17th century Abraham Cowley, Of Wit
      We take a falling meteor for a star.
    • if a man can be persuaded and fully assured of anything for a truth without having examined, what is there that he may not embrace for truth ?
    • c. 1690, John Dryden, Translations (Preface)
      Most of our ingenious young men take up some cry'd-up English poet for their model.
    • 1712, Ambrose Philips, The Distrest Mother
      But let her go for an ungrateful woman.
    • 1976, Louis L’Amour, The Rider of Lost Creek, Bantam Dell (→ISBN), Chapter 2:
      They knew him for a stranger.
  17. (usually in the phrase 'for all') Despite, in spite of.
    • 1892 August 6, "The Unbidden Guest", in Charles Dickens, Jr. (editor), All the Year Round,[2] page 133,
      Mr. Joseph Blenkinshaw was perhaps not worth quite so much as was reported; but for all that he was a very wealthy man []
  18. Indicating something desired or anticipated.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Life of Henry the Fift, Prologue:
      O For a Muſe of Fire, that would aſcend / The brighteſt Heauen of Inuention :
    • 1858 March 27, "The Lay of the Brief", in Punch, Or, The London Charivari, page 129:
      Oh! but to breathe the air / By their side under summer skies! To watch the blush on their cheeks, / The light in their liquid eyes. / Oh! but for one short hour, / To whisper a word of love; []
  19. (in expressions such as 'for a start') Introducing the first item(s) in a potential sequence.
  20. (with names, chiefly US) In honor of; after.
  21. Due or facing (a certain outcome or fate).
  22. (chiefly US) Out of; used to indicate a fraction, a ratio
  23. (cricket) Used as part of a score to indicate the number of wickets that have fallen.
  24. (obsolete) Indicating that in prevention of which, or through fear of which, anything is done.
  25. Used in various more-or-less idiomatic ways to construe individual verbs, indicating various semantic relationships such as target, purpose, result, etc.; see also the entries for individual phrasal verbs, e.g. ask for, look for, stand for, etc.

Alternative forms

  • (eye dialects): fo, fo', fur, fuh

Antonyms

  • against

Derived terms

Translations

Particle

for

  1. (nonstandard, in representations of dialectal speech, especially that of black speakers) To, the particle for marking the following verb as an infinitive.
    • 1896, McClure's magazine, page 270:
      “'Ugh—I'll not be able for get up. Send for M'sieu le Curé—I'll be goin' for die for sure.'
    • 2007, H. Nigel Thomas, Return to Arcadia: A Novel (Tsar Publications):
      "She say that when nigger people step out o' they place and start for rub shoulders with Bacra, trouble just 'round the corner."

Related terms

  • for to

References

  • Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition, Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8
  • for at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • for in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • 'fro, ORF, fro, orf

Abinomn

Noun

for

  1. a kind of fish

Catalan

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. prize, worth
  2. forum

Cornish

Noun

for

  1. Mixed mutation of mor.

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse fóðr, from Middle Low German vōder (linen, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (sheath).

Alternative forms

  • fór

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfoˀɐ̯], [ˈfoɐ̯ˀ]
  • Rhymes: -oːɐ̯

Noun

for n (singular definite foret, plural indefinite for)

  1. lining (covering for the inside of something)
  2. lining (material used for inside covering)
Inflection

References

“for,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

From Old Danish for, from Proto-Germanic *furai (in Western Old Norse replaced by the variant Old Norse fyrr, from Proto-Germanic *furiz, *furi, = Danish before).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fʌ]

Preposition

for

  1. for
  2. of
  3. to
  4. on
  5. at
  6. before, in front of
  7. by

Adverb

for

  1. too (more than enough; as too much)
  2. in front
  3. forward

Conjunction

for

  1. for, because

Etymology 3

See fare (to rush, run).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfoˀɐ̯], [ˈfoɐ̯ˀ]

Verb

for, fór or farede

  1. past tense of fare.

Esperanto

Etymology

Compare Latin forās (outside).

Pronunciation

Adverb

for

  1. away, far, gone
    • 1998, Henrik Ibsen, trans. Odd Tangerud Puphejmo : Dramo en tri aktoj, [3]
      NORA (komencas elpreni el la skatolo, sed baldaŭ forĵetas ĉion). Ho, se mi kuraĝus eliri. Se nur neniu venus. Se nur ne dume okazus io hejme. Stulta babilaĵo; neniu venos. Nur ne pensi. Brosi la mufon. Delikataj gantoj, delikataj gantoj. For el la pensoj! For, for! Unu, du, tri, kvar, kvin, ses — (krias) Jen, tie ili venas —
      NORA (begins to unpack the box, but soon pushes it all away). Oh, if I dared go out. If only no one would come. If only I could be sure nothing would happen here in the meantime. Stupid nonsense; no one will come. Only I mustn't think about it. I will brush my muff. What lovely, lovely gloves. Out of my thoughts, Away, away! One, two, three, four, five, six— (Screams) There, someone's coming—

Derived terms


French

Etymology

From Latin forum; doublet of fur and forum. Unrelated to French fort.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁ/

Noun

for m (plural not attested)

  1. (obsolete) Only used in for intérieur

Further reading

  • “for” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology 1

Inflected form of ir (to go).

Verb

for

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of ir

Etymology 2

Inflected form of ser (to be).

Verb

for

  1. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of ser

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔːr/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːr

Noun

for f (genitive singular forar, nominative plural forir)

  1. mud
    Synonym: drulla
  2. bog

Declension

Derived terms

  • forarpittur

Ido

Etymology

Borrowing from English far (from). Compare Esperanto for.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔr/

Preposition

for

  1. far from, away from

Derived terms


Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *fāōr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰéh₂ti (to speak). The verb's deponency's origin is unclear.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /for/, [fɔɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /for/, [fɔr]

Verb

for (present infinitive fārī or fārier, perfect active fātus sum); first conjugation, deponent, defective

  1. I speak, talk, say.

Conjugation

Certain forms were not used in Classical Latin.

1The present passive infinitive in -ier is a rare poetic form which is attested for this verb.

Synonyms

  • (say): dīcō, loquor, āiō, inquam

Derived terms

Related terms

  • fābula
  • fāma
  • fās

References

  • for in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • for in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • for in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Karl Gottlob Zumpt, 1846, A school-grammar of the Latin language, p146

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • vor, ver, fer, fur

Etymology

From Old English for, from Proto-Germanic *fura, *furi.

Preposition

for

  1. for

Conjunction

for

  1. for

Descendants

  • English: for
  • Scots: for
  • Yola: vor

References

  • “for, prep.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • “for, conj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Middle Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish for, from Proto-Celtic *uɸor, from Proto-Indo-European *uper.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /for/

Preposition

for (with accusative or dative)

  1. on, over
    • c. 1000, The Tale of Mac Da Thó's Pig, section 1, published in Irische Teste, vol. 1 (1880), edited by Ernst Windisch:

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 for”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrː/ (unstressed)
  • IPA(key): /fɔ/ (unstressed)

Etymology 1

Adverb

for

  1. too
Synonyms
  • altfor

Etymology 2

Conjunction

for

  1. for
Synonyms
  • fordi

Etymology 3

From Old Norse fóðr

Noun

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora or forene)

  1. alternative form of fôr
Derived terms
  • dyrefor
  • fiskefor

Etymology 4

Preposition

for

  1. for

Derived terms

  • vestenfor

Etymology 5

Verb

for

  1. past tense of fare.

References

  • “for” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrː/

Conjunction

for

  1. for, because

Etymology 2

From Old Norse fǫr, from Proto-Germanic *farō. Related to fara.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/

Alternative forms

  • fòr

Noun

for f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. travel
  2. footprints

Etymology 3

From Old Norse for, probably derived from earlier Proto-Germanic *furhs.

Alternative forms

  • fore, fòr, fòre

Noun

for f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. (agriculture) furrow
Derived terms
  • plogfòr
See also
  • får (Norwegian Bokmål)

Etymology 4

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fuːr/

Alternative forms

  • fór

Adjective

for (masculine and feminine for, neuter fort, definite singular and plural fore, comparative forare, indefinite superlative forast, definite superlative foraste)

  1. fast
    fórare!
    Go faster!

Etymology 5

From Old Norse fóðr, from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (fodder).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fuːr/

Noun

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora)

  1. alternative form of fôr (fodder)
Derived terms
  • dyrefor
  • fiskefor

Etymology 6

From Old Norse fóðr, borrowed from Middle Low German vōder (sheath, linen), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fuːr/

Noun

for n (definite singular foret, indefinite plural for, definite plural fora)

  1. alternative form of fôr (lining)

Etymology 7

From Old Norse fyrir

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrː/

Preposition

for

  1. for
  2. of

Adverb

for

  1. too
  2. in favour of
Derived terms
  • innanfor
  • utanfor
  • utfor

Etymology 8

Verb

for

  1. misspelling of fór, present tense of fara and fare

for

  1. imperative of fòra and fòre
  2. imperative of fôra and fôre

References

  • “for” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-West Germanic *furi

Alternative forms

  • fore

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /for/

Preposition

for

  1. for
Descendants
  • Middle English: for, vor, ver, fer, fur
    • English: for
    • Scots: for
    • Yola: vor

Etymology 2

see faran

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/

Verb

fōr

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of faran

Etymology 3

From Proto-Germanic *fōrō (trip; wagon).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/

Noun

fōr f (nominative plural fōra)

  1. journey, going, course, expedition, approach; passage, lifestyle, way of life
Declension

Etymology 4

Variant of fearh. From Proto-West Germanic *farh (pig). Cognate with Middle Low German vōr (lean young pig).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foːr/

Noun

fōr m

  1. hog, pig
Declension
Descendants
  • Middle English: *farow, *fargh (attested only in plural form faren)
    • English: farrow
    • Scots: ferrae, ferry, farry

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /for/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Celtic *sweseros, from *swīs (you (pl.)); compare Latin vester.

Alternative forms

  • far, bar

Determiner

for (triggers eclipsis)

  1. your (plural)
  2. you (plural; as the object of a preposition that takes the genitive)

For quotations using this term, see Citations:for.

Synonyms
  • sethar
Descendants
  • Irish: bhur
  • Scottish Gaelic: ur

Etymology 2

From Proto-Celtic *uɸor, from Proto-Indo-European *upér.

Alternative forms

  • far

Preposition

for (with accusative or dative)

  1. on, over

For quotations using this term, see Citations:for.

Inflection
Derived terms

Combinations with definite articles:

  • forsin(d) (masculine and feminine accusative singular, all genders dative singular)
  • forsa (neuter accusative singular)
  • for(s)na (accusative plural)
  • for(s)naib (dative plural)

Combinations with possessive determiners:

  • form (on my)
  • fort (on your sg)
  • fora (on his/her/its/their)

Combinations with relative pronouns:

  • for(s)a (on whom, on which)

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 for (‘on, over’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “2 for, far, bar, uar (‘your’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old Norse

Etymology

Probably derived from Proto-Germanic *furhs.

Noun

for f

  1. furrow

Descendants

  • Norwegian Nynorsk: for
  • Norwegian Bokmål: får
  • Old Swedish: for
    • Swedish: fåra

References

  • for in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Noun

for

  1. Alternative form of fora

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈfoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfoʁ/

Verb

for

  1. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ir
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ir
  3. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of ser
  4. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of ser

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English for.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɔʁ/, /ˈfɔɹ/

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. (programming) for loop (a loop that uses a counter)

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin forum

Noun

for n (plural foruri)

  1. forum

Declension


Swedish

Verb

for

  1. past tense of fara.

Walloon

Etymology

From Old French forn, from Latin furnus.

Noun

for m (plural fors)

  1. oven

Source: wiktionary.org
  • directed or sent to.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)