https://www.googletagservices.com/activeview/js/current/osd.js?cb=%2Fr20100101 Is GIT a Scrabble Word | Words made with the letters GIT | GIT in Scrabble dictionary?

Git in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does git mean? Is git a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is git worth? git how many points in Words With Friends? What does git mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for git

See how to calculate how many points for git.

Is git a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word git is a Scrabble US word. The word git is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

G2I1T1

Is git a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word git is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

G2I1T1

Is git a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word git is a Words With Friends word. The word git is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

G3I1T1

Our tools

Valid words made from Git

You can make 5 words from 'git' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'git'

GIT 4TIG 4

2 letters words from 'git'

GI 3IT 2
TI 2 

All 3 letters words made out of git

git igt gti tgi itg tig

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word git. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in git.

Definitions and meaning of git

git

Alternative forms

  • get

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɡɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪt
  • Homophone: ghit (one pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Middle English get ([illegitimate] offspring). A southern variant of Scots get (illegitimate child, brat), related to beget.

Noun

git (plural gits)

  1. (Britain, slang, derogatory) A silly, incompetent, stupid, annoying, or childish person (usually a man).
Usage notes
  • Git is usually used as an insult, more severe than twit but less severe than a true profanity like wanker or arsehole, and may often be used affectionately between friends. Get can also be used, with a subtle change of meaning. "You cheeky get!" is slightly less harsh than "You cheeky git!".
  • Git is frequently used in conjunction with another word to achieve a more specific meaning. For instance a "smarmy git" refers to a person of a slimy, ingratiating disposition; a "jammy git" would be a person with undeserved luck. The phrase "grumpy old git", denoting a cantankerous old man, is used with particular frequency.
  • In parts of northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland, get is still used in preference to git. In the Republic of Ireland, get, rather than git is used.
  • The word has been ruled by the Speaker of the House of Commons to be unparliamentary language.
Translations

Verb

git (third-person singular simple present gitting, present participle got, simple past and past participle gotten)

  1. (Appalachia, Southern US, African-American Vernacular) To get.
  2. (Appalachia, Southern US, African-American Vernacular) To get (leave; scram).

Etymology 2

Noun

git (plural gits)

  1. Alternative form of geat (channel in metal casting)

See also

  • git gud

References

Anagrams

  • GTi, IGT, tig

Dutch

Etymology

From French jet, or directly from Latin gagātēs after Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia).

Pronunciation

Noun

git n or f (plural gitten, diminutive gitje n)

  1. (neuter) lignite
  2. (neuter) jet (black, gemstone-like geological material)
  3. (masculine) a stone made of this material

Derived terms

  • gitzwart (jet-black, the blackest black)

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒi/

Verb

git

  1. Alternative spelling of gît (third-person singular present indicative of gésir)

Usage notes

This spelling was a product of the 1990 French spelling reforms.


Latin

Etymology

Compare Hebrew גַּד(gad) (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

git n (indeclinable)

  1. A plant (Nigella sativa), variously named black cumin, Roman coriander, or melanthion.

References

  • git in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • git in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *jit, from Proto-Germanic *jut. Cognate with North Frisian jat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jit/

Pronoun

ġit

  1. you two (nominative dual form of þū)

Related terms

  • incit
  • inc
  • incer

Descendants

  • Middle English: ȝit, ȝitt, ȝet

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *jit, from Proto-Germanic *jut, remodeled in Proto-Northwest Germanic to *jit by analogy with *wit.

Pronoun

git

  1. You two; nominative dual of thū

Declension


Polish

Etymology

From Yiddish גוט(gut), from Old High German guot, from Proto-Germanic *gōdaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʲit/

Interjection

git

  1. (colloquial) excellent!

Adjective

git

  1. (colloquial) just right

Declension

Indeclinable.

Further reading

  • git in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • git in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡit/
  • Hyphenation: git

Verb

git

  1. second-person singular imperative of gitmek

Antonyms

  • gitme
  • gel

Vilamovian

Noun

git f

  1. goodness

Volapük

Noun

git (nominative plural gits)

  1. law (body of binding rules and regulations, customs and standards)

Declension

Derived terms

  • gitav (jurisprudence)
  • gitavan (jurist)
  • gitavik (juristic)
  • gitäd (judiciary)
  • gität (right)
  • gitätön (have the right)
  • gitik (juridicial)
  • gitod (justification)
  • gitöf (legitimacy)
  • gitöfik (legitimate)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a fool.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)