Hat in Scrabble Dictionary

What does hat mean? Is hat a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is hat worth? hat how many points in Words With Friends? What does hat mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for hat

See how to calculate how many points for hat.

Is hat a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word hat is a Scrabble US word. The word hat is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

H4A1T1

Is hat a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word hat is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

H4A1T1

Is hat a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word hat is a Words With Friends word. The word hat is worth 5 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

H3A1T1

Our tools

Valid words made from Hat

You can make 5 words from 'hat' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'hat'

HAT 6 

2 letters words from 'hat'

AH 5AT 2
HA 5TA 2

All 3 letters words made out of hat

hat aht hta tha ath tah

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word hat. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in hat.

Definitions and meaning of hat

hat

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /hæt/
  • (Canada, California, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [hat]
  • (Northern US) IPA(key): [hɛt]
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

From Middle English hat, from Old English hæt (head-covering, hat), from Proto-Germanic *hattuz (hat), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to guard, cover, care for, protect). Cognate with North Frisian hat (hat), Danish hat (hat), Swedish hatt (hat), Icelandic hattur (hat), Latin cassis (helmet), Lithuanian kudas (bird's crest or tuft), Avestan 𐬑𐬀𐬊𐬛𐬀(xaoda, hat), Persian خود(xud, helmet), Welsh caddu (to provide for, ensure). Compare also hood.

Noun

hat (plural hats)

  1. A covering for the head, often in the approximate form of a cone or a cylinder closed at its top end, and sometimes having a brim and other decoration.
    • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  2. (figuratively) A particular role or capacity that a person might fill.
    • 1993, Susan Loesser, A Most Remarkable Fella: Frank Loesser and the Guys and Dolls in His Life: A Portrait by His Daughter, Hal Leonard Corporation (2000), →ISBN, p.121:
      My mother was wearing several hats in the early fifties: hostess, scout, wife, and mother.
  3. (figuratively) Any receptacle from which numbers/names are pulled out in a lottery.
    1. (figuratively, by extension) The lottery or draw itself.
  4. (video games) A hat switch.
    • 2002, Ernest Pazera, Focus on SDL, p.139:
      The third type of function allows you to check on the state of the joystick's buttons, axes, hats, and balls.
  5. (typography, nonstandard, rare) The háček symbol.
    • 1997 October 6th, “Patricia V. Lehman” (user name), rec.antiques (Usenet newsgroup), “Re: Unusual Mark – made in Cechoslovakia”, Message ID: <[email protected]>#1/1
      I’lll have to leave it up to antiques experts to tell you when objects were marked that way, but I can tell you it’s called a “hacek” (with the hat over the “c” and pronounced “hacheck”.) It is used to show that a “c” is pronounced as “ch” and an “s” as “sh.” Sometimes linguists just call it the “hat.”
  6. (programming, informal) The caret symbol ^.
  7. (Internet slang) User rights on a website, such as the right to edit pages others cannot.
  8. (Cambridge University slang, obsolete) A student who is also the son of a nobleman (and so allowed to wear a hat instead of a mortarboard).
Synonyms
  • (student and nobleman): gold hatband, tuft
Hyponyms
  • See also Thesaurus:headgear
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: ati
Translations
See also
  • take one's hat off to

Verb

hat (third-person singular simple present hats, present participle hatting, simple past and past participle hatted)

  1. (transitive) To place a hat on.
  2. (transitive) To appoint as cardinal.
    • 1929, "Five New Hats," Time, 2 December, 1929, [2]
      It was truly a breathtaking rise. From the quiet school, Pope Pius XI had jumped Father Verdier over the heads of innumerable Bishops, made him Archbishop of Paris. Soon he was to be hatted a Prince of the Church and put in charge of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. (Scotland, Northern England or obsolete) simple past tense of hit
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Further reading

  • hat on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • ATH, aht, tha

Cimbrian

Verb

hat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of haban

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hattr, hǫttr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [had̥]

Noun

hat c (singular definite hatten, plural indefinite hatte)

  1. hat

Inflection


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Verb

hat

  1. Third-person singular present of haben.

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈhɒt]
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *kutte (six). Cognates include Finnish kuusi, Mansi хо̄т (hōt), Khanty хәт (xət).

Numeral

hat

  1. six
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. (intransitive) to take effect, to be effective, to work
    Synonyms: hatásos, működik, beválik
  2. (intransitive) to affect, to have influence, to act (on something -ra/-re)
    Synonyms: kihat, érint, befolyásol
  3. (intransitive) to seem, appear (as something -nak/-nek)
    Synonyms: tűnik, látszik
Conjugation
Derived terms

(With verbal prefixes):

  • kihat
  • meghat
  • visszahat

Further reading

  • (six): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (to take effect): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

Interlingue

Verb

hat

  1. past and passive participle of har

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat̪ˠ/

Noun

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

Verb

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /haːt/

Verb

hat

  1. inflection of hunn:
    1. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    2. second-person plural preterite indicative

Verb

hat

  1. inflection of haen:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

Maricopa

Noun

hat (plural haat)

  1. dog

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hæt, hætt, from Proto-Germanic *hattuz.

Alternative forms

  • hatt, hatte, hæt

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hat/

Noun

hat (plural hattes or hatten)

  1. A hat or cap; a piece of headgear or headwear.
  2. A helmet; a hat used as armour.
  3. (rare) A circlet or tiara; a ring-shaped piece of headgear.
  4. (rare) A circle of foam or mist.
  5. (rare) A area of hilly woodland.
Related terms
  • hater
  • haterynge
  • hatten
  • hattere
  • ketil-hat
Descendants
  • Scots: hat, hatt, hate, hait
  • English: hat
  • Irish: hata
References
  • “hat (n.)” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-18.

Etymology 2

From Old English hete, influenced by haten.

Noun

hat

  1. Alternative form of hate

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hit.

Pronoun

hat

  1. it

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Noun

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata or hatene)

  1. hatred, hate
Derived terms
  • hatefull
  • hater
Related terms
  • hate (verb)

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. imperative of hate

References

  • “hat” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑːt/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz. Akin to English hate.

Noun

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata)

  1. hatred, hate

Derived terms

  • hatar
  • hatefull

Etymology 2

Verb

hat

  1. imperative of hate

References

  • “hat” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xɑːt/, [hɑːt]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *haitaz. Cognate with Old Frisian hēt (West Frisian hjit), Old Saxon hēt, Dutch heet, Old High German heiz (German heiß), Old Norse heitr (Swedish het). Cognate to Albanian ethe (shiver, fiever), dialectal hethe and ith (warmth, body heat), dialectal hith.

Adjective

hāt

  1. hot, fierce
Declension
Descendants
  • Middle English: hot, hat
    • English: hot
    • Scots: hat, hait, hate

Etymology 2

From Old English hātan.

Noun

hāt n

  1. a promise

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hɑːt/

Noun

hat n (uncountable)

  1. hatred, haught

Declension

Related terms

  • hata
  • hatbrott
  • judehat
  • rashat

Tok Pisin

Etymology 1

From English hat.

Noun

hat

  1. hat

Etymology 2

From English hard.

Adverb

hat

  1. hard
Related terms
  • hatpela
  • hatwok

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

Noun

hat (definite accusative hatı, plural hatlar)

  1. line
  2. writing

Declension


Turkmen

Etymology

Borrowed from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

Noun

hat (definite accusative haty, plural hatlar)

  1. letter (written message)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to provide with a covering for the head.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)