Man in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is man a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word man is a Scrabble US word. The word man is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

M3A1N1

Is man a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word man is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

M3A1N1

Is man a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word man is a Words With Friends word. The word man is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

M4A1N2

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Valid words made from Man

You can make 7 words from 'man' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'man'

MAN 5MNA 5
NAM 5 

2 letters words from 'man'

AM 4AN 2
MA 4NA 2

All 3 letters words made out of man

man amn mna nma anm nam

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word man. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in man.

Definitions and meaning of man

man

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /mæn/
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [mɛən], [meən], [mẽə̃n]
  • (Jamaica) IPA(key): [mɑn]
  • (General New Zealand, parts of South Africa) IPA(key): [mɛn]
  • Rhymes: -æn

Etymology 1

From Middle English man, from Old English mann m (human being, person, man), from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann- m (human being, man).

Alternative forms

  • (singular): mang (dialectal rendering, suggesting a Spanish accent), mans (slang), mon (slang, used in the vocative, in places such as Jamaica and Shropshire in England), mxn (rare, feminist)
  • (plural): mans (Multicultural London English, Toronto, nonstandard, proscribed), mens (nonstandard, African-American Vernacular), mxn (rare, feminist), myn (very rare, chiefly humorous)
  • (interjection): maaan (elongated)

Noun

man (plural men)

  1. An adult male human.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, act 4, scene 1:
      The king is but a man, as I am; the violet smells to him as it doth to me.
    • [] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:man.
  2. (collective) All human males collectively: mankind.
    • 2011, Eileen Gray and the Design of Sapphic Modernity: Staying In, page 109:
      Unsurprisingly, if modern man is a sort of camera, modern woman is a picture.
  3. A human, a person regardless of gender, usually an adult. (See usage notes.)
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, scene 2:
      [] a man cannot make him laugh.
    • c. 1700, Joseph Addison, Monaco, Genoa, &c., page 9:
      A man would expect, in so very ancient a town of Italy, to find some considerable antiquities; but all they have to show of this nature is an old Rostrum of a Roman ship, that stands over the door of their arsenal.
    • 1991 edition (original: 1953), Darell Huff, How to Lie with Statistics, pages 19–20:
      Similarly, the next time you learn from your reading that the average man (you hear a good deal about him these days, most of it faintly improbable) brushes his teeth 1.02 times a day—a figure I have just made up, but it may be as good as anyone else's – ask yourself a question. How can anyone have found out such a thing? Is a woman who has read in countless advertisements that non-brushers are social offenders going to confess to a stranger that she does not brush her teeth regularly?
    • 2021 January 20, Amanda Gorman, "The Hill We Climb":
      We are striving to forge our union with purpose. To compose a country committed to all cultures, colors, characters and conditions of man.
  4. (collective) All humans collectively: mankind, humankind, humanity. (Sometimes capitalized as Man.)
    • 1647, Westminster Shorter Catechism, question 10:
      How did God create man?
      God created man male and female, after his own image, in knowledge, righteousness, and holiness, with dominion over the creatures.
  5. (anthropology, archaeology, paleontology) A member of the genus Homo, especially of the species Homo sapiens.
    • 1990, The Almanac of Science and Technology →ISBN, page 68:
      The evidence suggests that close relatives of early man, in lineages that later became extinct, also were able to use tools.
  6. An male person, usually an adult; a (generally adult male) sentient being, whether human, supernatural, elf, alien, etc.
    • c. 1500, A Gest of Robyn Hode, in the Child Ballads:
      For God is holde a ryghtwys man.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, act 3, scene 5:
      God's a good man.
    • 1609, Ben Jonson, Epicœne, or The silent woman:
      Expect: But was the devil a proper man, gossip?
      As fine a gentleman of his inches as ever I saw trusted to the stage, or any where else.
    • 2008, Christopher Paolini, Brisingr: Or The Seven Promises of Eragon Shadeslayer and Saphira Bjartskular - Inheritance Book Three (→ISBN), page 549:
      Clearing a space between the tables, the men tested their prowess against one another with feats of wrestling and archery and bouts with quarterstaves. Two of the elves, a man and a woman, demonstrated their skill with swordplay— []
    • 2014, Oisin McGann, Kings of the Realm: Cruel Salvation, Penguin UK (→ISBN):
      There was a pair of burly dwarves – a woman and a man – bearing the markings of the formidable Thane Guards.
  7. An adult male who has, to an eminent degree, qualities considered masculine, such as strength, integrity, and devotion to family; a mensch.
    • 2011, Timothy Shephard, Can We Help Us?: Growing Up Bi-Racial in America →ISBN, page 181:
      I had the opportunity to marry one of them but wasn't mature enough to be a man and marry her and be close to the [] children and raise them [].
  8. (uncountable, obsolete, uncommon) Manliness; the quality or state of being manly.
    • 1598, Ben Jonson, Every Man in His Humour
      Methought he bare himself in such a fashion, / So full of man, and sweetness in his carriage, / []
  9. A husband.
    • Book of Common Prayer:
      I pronounce that they are man and wife.
    • 1715, Joseph Addison, The Freeholder:
      In the next place, every wife ought to answer for her man.
  10. A lover; a boyfriend.
  11. A male enthusiast or devotee; a male who is very fond of or devoted to a specified kind of thing. (Used as the last element of a compound.)
  12. A person, usually male, who has duties or skills associated with a specified thing. (Used as the last element of a compound.)
  13. A person, usually male, who can fulfill one's requirements with regard to a specified matter.
    • 2007, Thriller: Stories to Keep You Up All Night →ISBN, page 553:
      "She's the man for the job."
    • 2008, Soccer Dad: A Father, a Son, and a Magic Season →ISBN, page 148:
      Joanie volunteered, of course — if any dirty job is on offer requiring running, she's your man
    • 2012, The Island Caper: A Jake Lafferty Action Novel →ISBN, page 34:
      He also owns the only backhoe tractor on Elbow Cay, so whenever anyone needs a cistern dug, he's their man.
  14. A male who belongs to a particular group: an employee, a student or alumnus, a representative, etc.
    • 1909, Harper's Weekly, volume 53, page iii:
      When President Roosevelt goes walking in the country about Washington he is always accompanied by two Secret Service men.
    • 1913, Robert Herrick, One Woman's Life, page 46:
      "And they're very good people, I assure you — he's a Harvard man." It was the first time Milly had met on intimate terms a graduate of a large university.
  15. An adult male servant.
  16. (historical) A vassal; a subject.
    (old proverb)
    • c. 1700s, William Blackstone:
      The vassal, or tenant, kneeling, ungirt, uncovered, and holding up his hands between those of his lord, professed that he did become his man from that day forth, of life, limb, and earthly honour.
  17. A piece or token used in board games such as chess.
    • 1883, Henry Richter, Chess Simplified!, page 4:
      The white men are always put on that side of the board which commences by row I, and the black men are placed opposite.
  18. (MLE, slang) Used to refer to oneself or one's group: I, we; construed in the third person.
    • 2011, Top Boy:
      Sully: If it weren’t for that snake ... Man wouldn’t even be in this mess right now.
  19. A term of familiar address often implying on the part of the speaker some degree of authority, impatience, or haste.
  20. A friendly term of address usually reserved for other adult males.
  21. (sports) A player on whom another is playing, with the intent of limiting their attacking impact.
    • 2018 Dinny Navaratnam, Andrews will learn from experience: Fagan Brisbane Lions, 30 July 2018. Accessed 6 August 2018.
      "It was a brutal return to football for Brisbane Lions defender Harris Andrews as his man Tom Hawkins booted seven goals but Lions Coach Chris Fagan said the team's defensive faults, rather than the backman's, allowed the big Cat to dominate."
Usage notes
  • The use of “man” (compare Old English: mann, wer, wīf) to mean both “human (of any gender)” and “adult male”, which developed after Old English’s distinct term for the latter (wer) fell out of use, has been criticized since at least the second half of the twentieth century. Critics claim that the use of “man”, both alone and in compounds, to denote a human or any gender “is now often regarded as sexist or at best old-fashioned”, “flatly discriminatory in that it slights or ignores the membership of women in the human race”. The American Heritage Dictionary wrote that in 2004 75-79% of their usage panel still accepted sentences with generic man, and 86-87% accepted sentences with man-made. Some style guides recommend against generic “man”, and “although some editors and writers reject or disregard [...] objections to man as a generic, many now choose instead to use” human, human being or person instead.
    • This generic usage is still well-preserved in certain dialects, pidgins, and creoles of English, as well as fixed expressions and certain religious documents and declarations such as the Nicene Creed (e.g. "...for us men and our salvation..."). Consideration of this has often led to accusations of the critics of the generic man as enforcing linguistic prescriptivism.
  • See also the man
Synonyms
  • (adult male human): male; omi (Polari); see more at Thesaurus:man
  • (person): human, person, see more at Thesaurus:person
  • (board game piece): see Thesaurus:board game piece
Coordinate terms
  • (gender): woman
  • (age): boy
Derived terms
  • Category:English words suffixed with -man
Related terms
  • men
Descendants

See also descendants of -man.

  • Tok Pisin: man
  • Chinese: man
  • Chinook Jargon: man
  • Korean: (maen)
  • Spanish: man
  • Thai: แมน (mɛɛn)
  • Volapük: man
Translations

See man/translations § Noun.

See also
  • Old English: mann, wer, wīf.

Adjective

man (not comparable)

  1. Only used in man enough

Interjection

man

  1. Used to place emphasis upon something or someone; sometimes, but not always, when actually addressing a man.
    Man, that was a great catch!
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:man.
Translations

See man/translations § Interjection.

Etymology 2

From Middle English mannen, from Old English mannian, ġemannian (to man, supply with men, populate, garrison), from mann (human being, man). Cognate with Dutch bemannen (to man), German bemannen (to man), Swedish bemanna (to man), Icelandic manna (to supply with men, man).

Verb

man (third-person singular simple present mans, present participle manning, simple past and past participle manned)

  1. (transitive) To supply (something) with staff or crew (of either sex).
    The ship was manned with a small crew.
  2. (transitive) To take up position in order to operate (something).
    Man the machine guns!
  3. (reflexive, possibly dated) To brace (oneself), to fortify or steel (oneself) in a manly way. (Compare man up.)
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To wait on, attend to or escort.
  5. (transitive, obsolete, chiefly falconry) To accustom (a raptor or other type of bird) to the presence of people.

Derived terms

  • beman
  • overman (verb)
Translations

See man/translations § Verb.

References

Further reading

  • "man" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 188.
  • Man (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Man in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • 'Nam, 'nam, AMN, MNA, N. Am., NAM, Nam, mna

Abinomn

Noun

man

  1. moon

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch man, from Middle Dutch man, from Old Dutch man, from Proto-Germanic *mann.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/

Noun

man (plural mans or manne)

  1. man
  2. husband

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • Tosk: mën
  • Gheg: mand, mandë

Etymology

Syncopated form of Gheg mand, from Proto-Albanian *manta. Compare Ancient Greek βάτος (bátos, bramble), said by Beekes to be a Mediterranean wanderwort, and μαντία (mantía, blackberry) (Dacian loan).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/

Noun

man m (indefinite plural mana, definite singular mani, definite plural manat)

  1. mulberry, mulberry tree

Hyponyms

  • man i bardhë (white mulberry) (Morus alba)
  • man i kuq (red mulberry) (Morus rubra)
  • man i zi (black mulberry) (Morus nigra)
  • man toke (wild strawberry) (Fragoria vesca)

Arigidi

Pronoun

man

  1. I, first person singular pronoun, as subject

References

  • B. Oshodi, The HTS (High Tone Syllable) in Arigidi: An Introduction, in the Nordic Journal of African Studies 20(4): 263–275 (2011)

Bagirmi

Noun

man

  1. water

References

  • R. C. Stevenson, Bagirmi Grammar (1969)

Bariai

Noun

man

  1. bird

References

  • Steve Gallagher, Peirce Baehr, Bariai Grammar Sketch (2005)

Bikol Central

Adverb

man

  1. also

Bonggo

Noun

man

  1. bird

References

  • George W. Grace, Notes on the phonological history of the Austronesian languages of the Sarmi Coast, in Oceanic Linguistics (1971, 10:11-37)

Caló

Pronoun

man

  1. Contraction of mangue (I, me).

References

  • “man” in J. Tineo Rebolledo, A Chipicalli (La Llengua Gitana), Granada: Gómez de la Cruz, 1900, →OCLC, page 60.
  • “man” in Francisco Quindalé, Diccionario gitano, Madrid: Oficina Tipográfica del Hospicio.
  • “man” in Vocabulario : Caló - Español, Portal del Flamenco y Universidad.

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English man.

Pronunciation

  • (Mandarin) IPA(key): /mɛːn⁵⁵/
  • (Cantonese) IPA(key): /mɛːn⁵⁵/

Adjective

man

  1. (slang) manly; masculine
    • 而從審美的角度來看,李隆基絕對與美男子三個字無緣,但他卻有種很man的味道,吸引著女人的目光 [MSC, trad.]
      而从审美的角度来看,李隆基绝对与美男子三个字无缘,但他却有种很man的味道,吸引着女人的目光 [MSC, simp.]
      From: 2006, 狐千月, 《大俠,跟我回現代》
      Ér cóng shěnměi de jiǎodù lái kàn, Lǐ Lóngjī juéduì yǔ měinánzǐ sān ge zì wúyuán, dàn tā què yǒu zhǒng hěn man de wèidào, xīyǐn zhe nǚrén de mùguāng [Pinyin]
      From the perspective of esthetics, Li Longji definitely has nothing to do with the word handsome, but he still has that hint of manliness, attracting women to look
    • 如果妳的他是很man的男人,那就恭喜妳啦! [MSC, trad.]
      如果你的他是很man的男人,那就恭喜你啦! [MSC, simp.]
      From: 2007, 李意昕, 《愛情36計》, page 155
      Rúguǒ nǐ de tā shì hěn man de nánrén, nà jiù gōngxǐ nǐ la! [Pinyin]
      If your "he" is a manly man, then congratulations!
    • 若夠MAN就直率地說出你就是討厭娘味的男人 [MSC, trad.]
      若够MAN就直率地说出你就是讨厌娘味的男人 [MSC, simp.]
      From: 2010, 許常德, 《中年男人地下手記》, page 15
      ruò gòu MAN jiù zhíshuài de shuōchū nǐ jiùshì tǎoyàn niángwèi de nánrén [Pinyin]
      If you're manly enough, then candidly pronounce that you don't like sissy men.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:man.

Chinook Jargon

Etymology

Borrowed from English man.

Noun

man

  1. man

Synonyms

  • siwash

Antonyms

  • klootchman

Adjective

man

  1. male

Antonyms

  • klootchman

Chuukese

Noun

man

  1. Alternative spelling of maan

Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • mann, månn

Etymology

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m (Tredici Comuni)

  1. man
  2. husband

References

  • “man” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse mǫn, from Proto-Germanic *manō (mane).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maːˀn/, [mæˀn]

Noun

man c (singular definite manen, plural indefinite maner)

  1. (rare, used primarily by horse specialists) mane (longer hair growth on the back of the neck of a horse)
    Synonym: manke
Inflection

Etymology 2

The same word as the noun mand (man). Calque of German man.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/, [man]

Pronoun

man (accusative en or én, possessive ens or éns)

  1. you, one, they, people (a general, unspecified person)
  2. I (used modestly instead of the first-person pronoun)
  3. you (used derogatorily instead of the second-person pronoun)

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maːˀn/, [ˈmæˀn]

Verb

man

  1. imperative of mane

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch man, from Old Dutch man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑn/
  • Hyphenation: man
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Noun

man m (plural mannen or man or mans, diminutive mannetje n or manneke n or manneken n)

  1. man, human male, either adult or age-irrespective
  2. husband, male spouse

Usage notes

  • The normal plural is mannen. The unchanged form man is used after numerals only; it refers to the size of a group rather than a number of individuals. For example: In totaal verloren er 5000 man hun leven in die slag. (“5000 men altogether lost their lives in that battle.”) The plural mans is dated, now mostly occurring in nautical contexts or in dialect.
  • Compound words with -man as their last component often take -lieden or -lui in the plural, rather than -mannen. For example: brandweerman (firefighter)brandweerlieden (alongside brandweerlui and brandweermannen).
  • Various alternative diminutives exist, including manneke (used especially in Flanders) and the dialectal mannechie.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • men

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: man

Anagrams

  • nam

Faroese

Verb

man

  1. first/third-person singular present of munna
    I, he, she, it will / may

Derived terms

  • tað man vera (so) - this may be (so)
  • tað man óivað vera beinari - this will doubtless be more correct

Pronoun

man

  1. (colloquial) one, they (indefinite third-person singular pronoun)

Synonyms

  • (standard): mann

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

man m (plural mans)

  1. hand

Gaikundi

Noun

man

  1. foot

Further reading

  • Gaikundi-Ontena Organised Phonology Data (2011)

Galician

Alternative forms

  • mão (Reintegrationist)
  • mam (Reintegrationist)
  • mao

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese mão, from Latin manus.

Noun

man f (plural mans)

  1. hand
  2. Synonym: figurative ownership; protection; power; grasp

Derived terms

Usage notes

  • Man is a false friend, and does not mean man. Galician equivalents are shown in the "Translations" section of the English entry man.

References

  • “mão” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “mãao” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “man” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “man” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “man” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/
  • (Austria)
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Homophone: Mann

Etymology 1

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann- (man).

Pronoun

man

  1. one, you (indefinite pronoun; construed as a third-person singular)
    • 2008, Frank Behmeta, Wenn ich die Augen öffne, page 55:
  2. they, people (people in general)
  3. someone, somebody (some unspecified person)
  4. they (some unspecified group of people)
Usage notes
  • Man is used in the nominative case only; for the oblique cases forms of the pronoun einer are used. For example: Man kann nicht immer tun, was einen glücklich macht.One cannot always do what makes one happy.
  • Since man derives from the same source as Mann (man; male), its use is considered problematic by some feminists. They have proposed alternating man and the feminine neologism frau, or using the generic neologism mensch. This usage has gained some currency in feminist and left-wing publications, but remains rare otherwise.
  • In the sense of “someone,” man is often translated using the passive voice (“I was told that...” rather than “someone told me that...”).

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German man. A contraction of Old Saxon newan (none other than). Compare a similar contraction in Dutch maar (only).

Adverb

man

  1. (colloquial, regional, Northern Germany) just; only

German Low German

Etymology

From Middle Low German man. A contraction of Old Saxon newan (none other than). Compare a similar contraction in Dutch maar (only).

Conjunction

man

  1. (in many dialects, including Low Prussian) only; but

Synonyms

  • (in various dialects) avers, awer (and many variations thereof; for which, see those entries)
  • (in some dialects) bloots

Gothic

Romanization

man

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌽

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/, [maːn]
  • Rhymes: -aːn

Etymology 1

From Old Norse man, perhaps from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (with unstressed prefix *ga-).

Noun

man n (genitive singular mans, nominative plural mön)

  1. (obsolete, uncountable, collective) slaves
  2. (archaic, countable) a female slave
  3. (archaic or poetic, countable) maiden
Declension
Synonyms
  • (female slave): ambátt
Derived terms
  • mansal
  • mansmaður

Etymology 2

From mana (to dare [someone] [to do something]).

Noun

man n (genitive singular mans, no plural)

  1. the act of daring someone to do something; provocation, dare
Declension

Etymology 3

Appears in Guðbrandur Þorláksson’s 1584 Bible translation. Borrowed from German Man (in Luther’s 1534 German Bible), from Hebrew מן(mān, manna).

Noun

man n (indeclinable)

  1. (biblical, obsolete) manna

Synonyms

  • (manna): manna

Etymology 4

Verb

man

  1. first-person singular present indicative of muna; I remember
  2. third-person singular present indicative of muna; he/she/it remembers

References

  • “man” in: Ásgeir Blöndal Magnússon — Íslensk orðsifjabók, 1st edition, 2nd printing (1989). Reykjavík, Orðabók Háskólans.

Istriot

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

man m

  1. hand

Japanese

Romanization

man

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of マン

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

man f (plural mans)

  1. hand

Latvian

Pronoun

man

  1. to me; dative singular form of es

Ligurian

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [maŋ]

Noun

man f (plural moæn)

  1. hand

Lithuanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [man]

Pronoun

mán

  1. (first-person singular) dative form of .

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maːn/

Verb

man (third-person singular present meet, past participle gemat or gemeet, auxiliary verb hunn)

  1. (regional, southern dialects) Alternative form of maachen

Mandarin

Romanization

man

  1. Nonstandard spelling of mān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of mán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of mǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of màn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m

  1. human
  2. person
  3. man, male
  4. husband
  5. subordinate

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: man
  • Limburgish: man
  • Zealandic: man

Further reading

  • “man”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek[3], 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J., “man (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek[4], The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1885–1929, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English man (one, a person).

Alternative forms

  • mæn, mane, manne, mon, monne, ma, men

Pronoun

man

  1. Typically singular, indefinite pronoun: one, you (indefinite).
Derived terms
  • me
  • noman
  • animan
See also
  • me
  • ei
References
  • “man, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 12 June 2018.
  • “men, pron.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 12 June 2018.

Etymology 2

Noun

man

  1. Alternative form of mon (man)

Etymology 3

Verb

man

  1. (Late Middle English) Alternative form of mone (shall)

Miskito

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/

Pronoun

man

  1. (in the singular) you

See also


Norman

Alternative forms

  • main (Jersey)
  • môin (Guernsey)

Etymology 1

From Old French main, mein, man, from Latin manus (hand).

Noun

man f (plural mans)

  1. (France, anatomy) hand

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

man (feminine ma)

  1. my (belonging to me)
Coordinate terms
  • tan (your)
  • san (hers, his, its)

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian mīn, from Proto-West Germanic *mīn.

Pronoun

man m (feminine min, neuter min, plural min)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) my

Northern Kurdish

Verb

man

  1. to stay
  2. to remain

Northern Sami

Pronoun

man

  1. accusative/genitive singular of mii

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑn/
  • Homophone: mann
  • Rhymes: -ɑn

Pronoun

man

  1. you
  2. one
  3. they
  4. people

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːn

Noun

man f or m (definite singular mana or manen, indefinite plural maner, definite plural manene)

  1. a mane (of a horse)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

man f (definite singular mana, indefinite plural maner, definite plural manene)

  1. mane (of a horse)

Occitan

Etymology

From Old Occitan man, from Latin manus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ma]

Noun

man f (plural mans)

  1. hand

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m

  1. human, person
  2. man, male

Inflection

Derived terms

  • ambahtman

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: man
    • Dutch: man
    • Limburgish: man
    • Zealandic: man

Further reading

  • “man (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek[5], 2012

Old English

Etymology 1

From mann.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑn/

Pronoun

man

  1. one, you (indefinite pronoun; construed as a third-person singular)
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "The First Sunday in September, When Job Is Read"
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "Dedication of the Church of St. Michael"
  2. they, people (people in general)
  3. someone, somebody (some unspecified person)
  4. they (some unspecified group of people)
  5. often used where modern English would use the passive voice
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy
    • Early 11th century, Wulfstan, "On the Beginning of Creation"
Descendants
  • Middle English: man, me

Etymology 2

See mann.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑnn/, [mɑn]

Noun

man m

  1. Alternative form of mann

Etymology 3

From Proto-Germanic *mainą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɑːn/

Noun

mān n

  1. crime, sin, wickedness
Derived terms
  • mānswerian

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m

  1. man

Descendants

  • Middle High German: man
    • Alemannic German: ma, , Maa, Mann, Mànn, mo, ma'
      Swabian: Ma, , , Mâo, Mâu
    • Bavarian: mon, mònn, moon, ma'
      Cimbrian: man, mann, månn
      Mòcheno: mònn
    • Central Franconian:
      Hunsrik: Mann
    • East Central German:
      Silesian German: Moan
    • German: Mann, man
    • Luxembourgish: Mann
    • Rhine Franconian:
      Pennsylvania German: Mann
    • Yiddish: מאַן(man)

Old Norse

Noun

man n (genitive mans, plural mǫn)

  1. household, house-folk, bondslaves
  2. bondwoman, female slave
  3. woman, maid
    • 900-1100, The Alvíssmál, verse 7:

Declension

Derived terms

  • mankynni n pl
  • mansal n
  • mansmaðr m

Descendants

  • Icelandic: man

References

  • Zoëga, Geir T., A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic[6], Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1910

Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

man f (oblique plural mans, nominative singular man, nominative plural mans)

  1. hand (anatomy)

Descendants

  • Catalan:
  • Occitan: man

References

  • von Wartburg, Walther, “manus”, in Französisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 61, 1928–2002, page 285

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m

  1. human, person
  2. man

Synonyms

Descendants

  • Middle Low German: man
    • German Low German: Mann
      • Plautdietsch: Maun

Old Spanish

Etymology

From Latin māne (morning).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mãn]

Noun

man f (plural manes)

  1. morning
    • c. 1200: Almerich, Fazienda de Ultramar, f. 18r.
      Fue el dia ṫcero al alba dela man. ¬ vinẏerȯ truenos ¬ relȧpagos ¬ nuf grȧt ſobrel mȯt.
      It was the early morning of the third day, and there came thunder and flashes of lightning and a great cloud upon the mountain.

Synonyms

  • mannana f

Papiamentu

Etymology

From Spanish mano.

Noun

man

  1. hand

Sambali

Adverb

man

  1. also

Scottish Gaelic

Preposition

man

  1. Alternative form of mar

Usage notes

  • Unlike mar, man does not lenite the following word.

Spanish

Etymology

English man

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈman/, [ˈmãn]

Noun

man m (plural men)

  1. (Latin America, colloquial) man, guy, dude
    Synonyms: tipo, tío

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From English man.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/

Noun

man

  1. man, male human

Derived terms

  • -man
  • manpikin

Verb

man

  1. to be able to

Synonyms

  • kan

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish maþer, mander, from Old Norse maðr, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Pronunciation

Noun

man m

  1. man (adult male human)
  2. husband
  3. a member of a crew, workforce or (military) troop
Declension

See also

(husband): make, gemål

Usage notes

(adult male human): The unchanged plural man is sometimes used after numerals. It means "men" as a measure for size or strength of a group rather than individuals:

Military or police personnel, team members, demonstrators and the like are often counted using this unchanged plural. The same goes with German where Mann can have an unchanged plural form in this particular case.

(husband): Not used in other contexts, where could be confused with a man in general.

Pronoun

man c

  1. (indefinite) one, they; people in general
Declension

See Template:sv-decl-ppron for more pronouns.

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish man, from Old Norse mǫn, from Proto-Germanic *manō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑːn/

Noun

man c

  1. mane (of a horse or lion)
Declension

Anagrams

  • nam

Tagalog

Adverb

man

  1. although; even if; even though
  2. also

Tarpia

Noun

man

  1. bird

References

  • George W. Grace, Notes on the phonological history of the Austronesian languages of the Sarmi Coast, in Oceanic Linguistics (1971, 10:11-37)

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English man.

Noun

man

  1. man (adult male human)

Adjective

man

  1. male

Antonyms

  • meri

Derived terms

  • bigman
  • konman
  • manmeri
  • paniman

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English man.

Noun

man

  1. husband
  2. a married man
  3. any man

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin manus.

Noun

man f (invariable)

  1. hand

Vietnamese

Etymology

Non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (ten thousand, SV: vạn). Doublet of muôn and vạn.

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [maːn˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [maːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [maːŋ˧˧]
  • Homophone: mang

Numeral

man

  1. (archaic) ten thousand; myriad
    một man
    ten thousand

Derived terms

  • cơ man (a large quantity of)

Volapük

Etymology

Borrowed from the descendants of Proto-West Germanic *mann.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [man]

Noun

man (nominative plural mans)

  1. man (adult male human)

Declension

Coordinate terms

  • vom

Derived terms


Welsh

Etymology

From Middle Welsh mann, from Proto-Celtic *mendu- (mark, location), from Proto-Indo-European *mend- (physical defect, fault), same source as Old Irish mennar (blemish, stain).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /man/

Noun

man m or f (plural mannau)

  1. place

Mutation

References

  • Matasović, Ranko, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, 2009, →ISBN, pages 264

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔn/

Noun

man c (plural manlju or mannen, diminutive mantsje)

  1. man
    Coordinate term: frou
  2. husband
    Coordinate term: frou

Further reading

  • “man (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal[7] (in Dutch), 2011

Westrobothnian

Etymology

From Old Norse meðan, from Proto-Germanic *medanō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [mɑ̀ːn] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -ɑ̀ːn, -èːðan

Conjunction

mān

  1. meanwhile, as long as, while, whilst
    tyst man jag sȯf
    be quiet while I sleep

Alternative forms

  • mea
  • meda

Wik-Mungkan

Noun

man

  1. neck

Derived terms

  • man awal
  • man ngaat
  • man poonchal

Wolof

Pronunciation

Pronoun

man

  1. I (first-person singular subject pronoun)

See also


Yola

Etymology

From Middle English man, from Old English mann, from Proto-West Germanic *mann.

Noun

man

  1. man
  2. husband

Antonyms

  • mawen, mawn

References

  • Jacob Poole, William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, 1867, →ISBN

Zealandic

Etymology

From Middle Dutch man, from Old Dutch man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun

man m (plural mannen)

  1. man
  2. husband

Source: wiktionary.org
  • an adult human male.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)