Nap in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does nap mean? Is nap a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is nap worth? nap how many points in Words With Friends? What does nap mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for nap

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Is nap a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word nap is a Scrabble US word. The word nap is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

N1A1P3

Is nap a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word nap is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

N1A1P3

Is nap a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word nap is a Words With Friends word. The word nap is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

N2A1P4

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Valid words made from Nap

You can make 5 words from 'nap' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

3 letters words from 'nap'

NAP 5PAN 5

2 letters words from 'nap'

AN 2NA 2
PA 4 

All 3 letters words made out of nap

nap anp npa pna apn pan

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word nap. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in nap.

Definitions and meaning of nap

nap

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /nap/
  • (US) IPA(key): /næp/
  • Rhymes: -æp
  • Homophone: knap

Etymology 1

From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (to doze, slumber, sleep), from Proto-Germanic *hnappōną (to nap). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (whence Middle High German nafzen (to slumber) whence German dialectal napfezen, nafzen (to nod, slumber, nap)).

Noun

nap (plural naps)

  1. A short period of sleep, especially one during the day.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:shut-eye, Thesaurus:sleep
Derived terms
  • catnap
  • dirt nap
  • micronap
  • napless
Translations
See also

See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take for collocations of nap.

Verb

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. To have a nap; to sleep for a short period of time, especially during the day.
    Synonyms: snooze, doze
  2. (figuratively) To be off one's guard.
    • a. 1684, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
      I took thee napping, unprepared.
Derived terms
  • catch napping
Translations

Etymology 2

From late Middle English noppe, nappe, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German noppe, noppen (to trim the nap), ultimately from knappen (to eat, crack), of imitative origin. Related to the first element of knapsack.

Noun

nap (countable and uncountable, plural naps)

  1. A soft or fuzzy surface, generally on fabric or leather.
    • 1591, King Henry VI part II, by William Shakespeare:
      I tell thee, Jack Cade the clothier means to dress the commonwealth, and turn it, and set a new nap upon it.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 16:
      On his long, gaunt body, he carried no spare flesh, no superfluous beard, his chin having a soft, economical nap to it, like the worn nap of his broad-brimmed hat.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, page 37:
      There were low bookshelves, there was a thick pinkish Chinese rug in which a gopher could have spent a week without showing his nose above the nap.
    • 1961, Skyline, page 9:
      THEY CALL IT the "nap of the Earth," that area from the ground to the level of surrounding trees and hills, the thin rug of foliage and rock folds at the Earth's skin line that has become all-important to the United States Army.
    • 1987, Some Data Processing Requirements for Precision Nap-Of-the-Earth (NOE) Guidance and Control of Rotorcraft:
      If incorporated in automatic guidance, this practical pursuit adjustment will enhance pilot acceptance of automatic guidance in following nap-of-the-earth profiles with precision.
  2. The common direction, on some kinds of fabric, of the hairs making up the pile.
    If the fabric has a nap, make sure all pieces are cut with the nap going the same direction.
    • 1969, Classic Car, volumes 17-19, page 32:
      Instead of grinding the pistons straight around the axis, they are ground diagonally with a special-built machine. As a result, the “nap” of the metal is turned in such a way that, when it meets the “nap” of the cylinder wall, both surfaces quickly develop a high finish which removes the danger of scoring a piston.
Derived terms
  • napless
Translations

Verb

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. To form or raise a soft or fuzzy surface on (fabric or leather).

Etymology 3

From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France.

Noun

nap (plural naps)

  1. (Britain) A type of bet in British horse racing, based on the experts' best tips.
  2. (uncountable, card games) A card game in which players take tricks; properly Napoleon.
  3. A bid to take five tricks in the card game Napoleon.
Derived terms
  • go nap
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Swedish nappa (to pluck, pinch). Related to nab.

Verb

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (obsolete) To grab; to nab.
Derived terms
  • kidnap

Etymology 5

From French napper, from nappe (nape).

Verb

nap (third-person singular simple present naps, present participle napping, simple past and past participle napped)

  1. (cooking) To cover (something) with a sauce. (usually in the passive)
    • 2006, Wayne Gisslen, Mary Ellen Griffin, Professional Cooking for Canadian Chefs:
      Vanilla ice cream topped with a poached or canned pear half, napped with chocolate sauce, and garnished with toasted sliced almonds.

Etymology 6

From Middle English nap (a bowl), from Old English hnæpp (a cup, bowl), from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz (a cup, bowl). Cognate with Dutch nap (drinking cup), German Napf (bowl), Low German Napp (bowl, cup), Icelandic hnappur (button, key). Doublet of hanap. See also nappy.

Noun

nap (plural naps)

  1. (dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A cup, bowl.
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Anagrams

  • ANP, NPA, PAN, PNA, Pan, Pan., anp, pan, pan-

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan nap, from Latin nāpus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈnap/
  • Rhymes: -ap

Noun

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip, Brassica rapa

Chuukese

Adjective

nap

  1. great

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch nap, from Old Dutch nap, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɑp/
  • Hyphenation: nap
  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Noun

nap m (plural nappen, diminutive napje n)

  1. drinking cup

Derived terms

  • bedelnap
  • zuignap

Anagrams

  • pan

Hungarian

Etymology

Of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnɒp]
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Noun

nap (plural napok)

  1. day
  2. sun (also written Nap in astronomical context)
  3. (attributive) solar

Usage notes

(day):

(sun): Some astronomical and geographical terms have both a lowercase (common noun) and a capitalized (proper noun) form. For föld (ground, soil; Earth)―​Föld (Earth), hold (moon, satellite; Moon)―​Hold (our Moon), and nap (day; sun; Sun)―​Nap (our Sun), the lowercase forms are used in the everyday sense and the capitalized forms in the astronomical sense. In other similar pairs, the former refers to generic sense, and the latter specifies the best known referent: egyenlítő (equator)―​Egyenlítő (Equator), naprendszer (solar system)―​Naprendszer (Solar System), and tejút (galaxy, literally “milky way”, but galaxis and galaktika are more common)―​Tejút (Milky Way).[1][2][3]

Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • nap in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hnæpp, from Proto-Germanic *hnappaz.

Alternative forms

  • nep, nappe, neppe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nap/

Noun

nap (plural nappes)

  1. A bowl for one's beverages; a chalice.
Descendants
  • English: nap (now dialectal)
  • Scots: nap
References
  • “nap, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-30.

Etymology 2

A back-formation from nappen.

Alternative forms

  • nappe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nap/

Noun

nap

  1. A nap or doze; a short sleep.
Descendants
  • English: nap
  • Scots: nap
  • Yola: nappe
References
  • “nap, n.(2).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-30.

Etymology 3

Verb

nap

  1. Alternative form of nappen

Occitan

Etymology

From Old Occitan nap, from Latin nāpus.

Pronunciation

Noun

nap m (plural naps)

  1. turnip (Brassica rapa)

Derived terms

  • nap del diable

References

  • Arve Cassignac, L'Occitan de Comunicason, 2019

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin nāpus.

Noun

nap m (plural napi)

  1. turnip or swede (Brassica napus)
  2. carrot

Declension

See also

  • navetă
  • rapiță
  • sfeclă

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to sleep briefly.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)