Not in Scrabble Dictionary

What does not mean? Is not a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is not worth? not how many points in Words With Friends? What does not mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for not

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Is not a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word not is a Scrabble US word. The word not is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

N1O1T1

Is not a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word not is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

N1O1T1

Is not a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word not is a Words With Friends word. The word not is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

N2O1T1

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Valid words made from Not

You can make 5 words from 'not' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'not'

NOT 3TON 3

2 letters words from 'not'

NO 2ON 2
TO 2 

All 3 letters words made out of not

not ont nto tno otn ton

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word not. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in not.

Definitions and meaning of not

not

Etymology

From Middle English not, nat, variant of noght, naht (not, nothing), from Old English *nōht, nāht (nought, nothing), short for nōwiht, nāwiht (nothing, literally not anything), corresponding to ne (not) + ōwiht, āwiht (anything), corresponding to ā (ever, always) + wiht (thing, creature). Cognate with Scots nat, naucht (not), Saterland Frisian nit (not), West Frisian net (not), Dutch niet (not), German nicht (not). Compare nought, naught and aught. More at no, wight, whit.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation)
    • IPA(key): /nɒt/
  • (General American)
    • IPA(key): /nɑt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • Homophone: knot
  • Homophone: naught, nought (cotcaught merger)

Adverb

not (not comparable)

  1. Negates the meaning of the modified verb.
    • 1973 November 17, Richard Milhous Nixon, Orlando press conference:
      People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook. Well, I'm not a crook. I've earned everything I've got.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 59:
      The sound of Abba singing 'Dancing Queen' had started up in a room the other side of the court. Adrian slammed the window shut.
      ‘That'll teach you to throw things out of the window,’ said Gary.
      ‘It'll teach me not to throw things out of the window.’
    • 1998 January 26, William Jefferson Clinton, White House press conference:
      I want to say one thing to the American people. I want you to listen to me. I'm going to say this again: I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Oh, Pete. This is not the gym. — That’s right, Anna. This is the mailroom.
    Not knowing any better, I went ahead.
  2. To no degree.
  3. (understatement, litotes) Used to modify superlatives to indicate the opposite or near opposite, often in a form of understatement.
    That day was not the best day of my life.
    It was not my favorite movie of all time.

Usage notes

In modern usage, do-support requires that the form do not ... (or don’t ...) be preferred to ... not for all but a short list of verbs (be, have, can, shall, will, would, may, must, need, ought):

  • They do not sow. (modern) vs. They sow not. (KJB)

American usage tends to prefer don’t have or haven’t got to have not or haven’t, except when have is used as an auxiliary (or in the idiom have-not):

  • I don’t have a clue or I haven’t got a clue. (US)
  • I haven’t a clue or I haven’t got a clue. (outside US)
  • I haven’t been to Spain. (universal)

The verb need is only directly negated when used as an auxiliary, and even this usage is rare, especially in the US.

  • You don’t need to trouble yourself. (common)
  • You needn’t trouble yourself. (outside US, rare)
  • I don’t need any eggs today. (universal)

The verb dare can sometimes be directly negated.

  • I daren't do that.

The verb do, as a main verb, takes do not.

  • He does not do that.

In the imperative, all verbs, including be, take do not.

  • Don't do that.
  • Don't be silly. (not *Be not silly.)

In the infinitive, verbs must be negated directly. In this case not cannot appear after the verb; some authorities recommend placing it before to to avoid a split infinitive, but for most speakers the forms not to do and to not do are more or less interchangeable, with the latter being mostly informal.

  • The objective is not to lose or The objective is to not lose.
  • I wanted not to go or I wanted to not go. (Note the difference between this and I didn't want to go, where want is the verb being negated.)

Derived terms

  • not to put too fine a point on it

Related terms

Translations

Conjunction

not

  1. And not.
    I wanted a plate of shrimp, not a bucket of chicken.
    He painted the car blue and black, not solid purple.

Usage notes

  • The construction “A, not B” is synonymous with the constructions “A, and not B”; “not B, but A”; and “not B, but rather A”.

Translations

Interjection

not!

  1. (slang, 1990s) Used to indicate that the previous phrase was meant sarcastically or ironically.
    I really like hanging out with my little brother watching Barney... not!
    Sure, you're perfect the way you are... not!

Synonyms

  • bender, I don't think

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:American Dialect Society words of the year

Noun

not (plural nots)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of NOT

Usage notes

Boolean operators and states are commonly written in all uppercase in order to distinguish them from the ordinary uses of the words.

Translations

Contraction

not

  1. (obsolete) Contraction of ne wot; not to know.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Geoffrey Chaucer, The Knight's Tale.
      I noot which was the fairer of hem two

See also

References

  • not at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • -ton, NTO, ONT, Ont, Ont., TNO, TON, on't, ton

Albanian

Etymology

From notoj.

Noun

not m

  1. swim

Related terms

  • notoj (to swim), bën not (to swim)

Aromanian

Etymology 1

From Greek νότος (nótos).

Alternative forms

  • Not

Noun

not m

  1. dry wind from the south

Synonyms

  • iug

See also

  • vimtu
  • sud/Sud
  • livã
  • austru

Etymology 2

Verb

not

  1. Alternative form of anot to swim

Etymology 3

From anot (I swim). Compare Italian nuoto, Portuguese nado.

Noun

not m

  1. swim, swimming

Synonyms

  • notalui

Danish

Etymology 1

From German Nut.

Noun

not c (singular definite noten, plural indefinite noter)

  1. (mechanics) A groove.
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Norwegian not.

Noun

not class /n (singular definite noten or notet, plural indefinite noter or not)

  1. (fishing) seine net
    Synonym: snurpenot
Inflection
Derived terms
  • snurpenot

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

not

  1. imperative of note

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɔːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːt

Noun

not n pl (plurale tantum)

  1. use

Declension

Synonyms

  • (use): gagn, notkun

Derived terms

  • koma að notum (to be of use, to be useful)

Related terms

  • nota (to use)

Luxembourgish

Adjective

not

  1. strong/weak nominative/accusative neuter singular of no

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnuːt/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse nót.

Noun

not f (definite singular nota, indefinite plural nøter, definite plural nøtene)

  1. Alternative spelling of nót

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German.

Noun

not f (definite singular nota, indefinite plural noter, definite plural notene)

  1. Alternative spelling of nót

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun

not

  1. (dialectal, Trøndelag and Northern Norway) Apocopic form of note

References

Anagrams

  • ton

Old English

Alternative forms

  • nōt

Etymology

From Latin nota.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /not/

Noun

not m (nominative plural notas)

  1. a sign; mark; a mark made on an object

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: note, noote
    • Scots: note
    • English: note

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse nót, from Proto-Germanic *nōtō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /noːt/

Noun

nōt f

  1. net, seine

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: not

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) notg

Etymology

From Latin noctem, accusative of nox, from Proto-Indo-European *nókʷts.

Noun

not f (plural nots)

  1. (Puter, Vallader) night

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

not m (genitive singular not, plural notaichean)

  1. Alternative form of nota.
  2. Alternative form of nota.

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnuːt/

Noun

not c

  1. (music) note.
  2. a short message; note.
  3. (diplomacy) a formal message from a country to another country’s embassy.

Declension

Anagrams

  • ont, ton

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English North.

Noun

not

  1. North

Turkish

Noun

not (definite accusative notu, plural notlar)

  1. a short message; note

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • in no way.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)