Os in Scrabble Dictionary

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Is os a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word os is a Scrabble US word. The word os is worth 2 points in Scrabble:

O1S1

Is os a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word os is a Scrabble UK word and has 2 points:

O1S1

Is os a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word os is a Words With Friends word. The word os is worth 2 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

O1S1

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2 letters words from 'os'

OS 2SO 2

Definitions and meaning of os

os

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin os (a bone).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs

Noun

os (plural ossa)

  1. (rare, anatomy) Synonym of bone.
Usage notes

Only used by doctors and surgeons when practising. Not used by medical laypeople.

Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin ōs (the mouth).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs

Noun

os (plural ora)

  1. (anatomy) An opening or entrance to a passage, particularly one at either end of the cervix, internal (to the uterus) or external (to the vagina).
    Synonym: orifice
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowed from Swedish ås.

Pronunciation

Noun

os

  1. An osar or esker.

Etymology 4

From o +‎ -s.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /əʊz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /oʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Noun

os

  1. (rare) Alternative form of o's.
Usage notes
  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

References

  • “os”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “os”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • S&O, SO, So, So., s.o., s/o, so

Aragonese

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *lōs, from Latin illōs.

Article

os m pl

  1. the

Usage notes

  • The form los, either pronounced as los or as ros, can be found after words ending with -o.
  • Some dialects use the form els, often shortened to es.

Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • osu

Etymology

From Latin ossum, from os. Compare Romanian os.

Noun

os n (plural oasi or oase)

  1. bone

Related terms

  • usos

Catalan

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan os, from Latin ossum, popular variant of os.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɔs/

Noun

os m (plural ossos)

  1. bone
Derived terms
  • os de sant
  • os frontal
  • os parietal
  • os pisiforme
  • ossada
  • ossam
  • ossera
Related terms
  • ossa
  • ossari
  • ossi

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈos/

Noun

os m (plural ossos, feminine ossa)

  1. (2016 spelling reform) Alternative form of ós (bear)

Further reading

  • “os” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “os” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “os” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “os” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse oss (us).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/, [ʌs]

Pronoun

os

  1. us, objective of vi
  2. (reflexive) ourselves
  3. (pluralis majestatis) ourself
See also

Etymology 2

Disputed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oːs/, [oːˀs]

Noun

os c (singular definite osen, not used in plural form)

  1. smoke
  2. reek
  3. fug

Verb

os

  1. imperative of ose

Daur

Etymology

From Proto-Mongolic *usun. Compare Mongolian ус (us).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/, [ɔs]

Noun

os

  1. water

References

  • Henry G. Schwarz, The Minorities of Northern China: A Survey (1984), page 140: 'water' Daur os

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch osse, from Old Dutch *osso, earlier *ohso, from Proto-Germanic *uhsô.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/
  • Hyphenation: os
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Noun

os m (plural ossen, diminutive osje n)

  1. ox (a castrated bull)

Derived terms

  • ossenhuid
  • ossenwagen

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: os
  • Negerhollands: os

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese os, from Latin illōs.

Article

os m pl (singular o, feminine a, feminine plural as)

  1. masculine plural of o (the)

French

Etymology

From Old French os, from Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone), *h₂óst.

Pronunciation

  • Singular:
    • IPA(key): /ɔs/
    • Rhymes: -ɔs
  • Plural:
    • IPA(key): /o/
      • Rhymes: -o
      • Homophones: au, aulx, aux, eau, eaux, haut, hauts, ho, o, ô, oh
    • (after a consonant other than /z/ also) IPA(key): /ɔs/

Noun

os m (plural os)

  1. bone

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “os” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • SO

Galician

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese os, from Vulgar Latin *los, from Latin illōs, accusative plural of ille (that).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʊs/

Article

os m pl (masculine singular o, feminine singular a, feminine plural as)

  1. (definite) the
Usage notes

The definite article o (in all its forms) regularly forms contractions when it follows the prepositions a (to), con (with), de (of, from), and en (in). For example, con os ("with the") contracts to cos, and en os ("in the") contracts to nos.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronoun

os

  1. accusative of eles

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese osso. Cognate with Kabuverdianu osu.

Noun

os

  1. bone

Irish

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Connacht) IPA(key): /ɔsˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /ʌsˠ/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish oss, from Proto-Celtic *uxsū, from Proto-Indo-European *uksḗn (bull).

Noun

os m (genitive singular ois, nominative plural ois)

  1. (literary) deer
    Synonym: fia
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Irish úas, ós, from Proto-Celtic *ouxsos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ewps-.

Preposition

os (plus dative, triggers no mutation)

  1. over, above
Derived terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • "os" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “os” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Istro-Romanian

Etymology

From Latin ossum, from os.

Noun

os n (plural ose, definite singular osu, definite plural osele)

  1. bone

Latin

Etymology 1

From Proto-Italic *ōs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃éh₁os. Cognates include Hittite 𒀀𒄿𒅖 (aiš), Sanskrit आस् (ās), Old Irish á.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /oːs/, [oːs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /os/, [ɔs]

Noun

ōs n (genitive ōris); third declension

  1. mouth
    Synonym: bucca
    Hyponyms: buccula, ōsculum
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. (in general) face, countenance
      Synonyms: (Vulgar Latin) cara, faciēs, frōns, vultus
    2. head
      Synonym: caput
    3. (poetic) speech
    4. mouth, opening, entrance, aperture, orifice
    5. beak of a ship
    6. edge of a sword
Inflection

Third-declension noun (neuter, i-stem).

Derived terms
Descendants
  • English: os

Etymology 2

From Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone), *h₂óst. Cognates include Ancient Greek ὀστέον (ostéon), Sanskrit अस्थि (asthi) and Old Armenian ոսկր (oskr).

Alternative forms

  • ossum, ossu, ossua

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /os/, [ɔs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /os/, [ɔs]

Noun

os n (genitive ossis); third declension

  1. (literally, anatomy) bone
    "ipsorum ore respondent se lassis post viam ossibus non posse de lecto surgere..." Regula magistri
    By the same mouth they respond that, due to their weary bones after travel, it is not possible to arise from bed.
    1. (transferred sense) hard or innermost part of trees or fruits; heartwood
  1. (figuratively) bones, framework or outline of a discourse
Inflection

Third-declension noun (neuter, i-stem).

Derived terms
Related terms
  • exossātus
  • ossuārium
Descendants

References

  • ōs in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ŏs in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ōs in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • os in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • os in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 1095
  • os in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Middle English

Pronoun

os

  1. Alternative form of us

Middle French

Noun

os m (plural os)

  1. bone

Descendants

  • French: os

Middle Low German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /œs/

Pronoun

ös

  1. (personal pronoun, dative, accusative) Alternative form of uns.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /uːs/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse óss. Same as Latin os.

Noun

os m (definite singular osen, indefinite plural osar, definite plural osane)
os n (definite singular oset, indefinite plural os, definite plural osa)

  1. an outlet, estuary, river mouth (where a river runs out of a lake, or enters a lake or the ocean)

Etymology 2

Of unknown origin.

Noun

os m (definite singular osen, indefinite plural osar, definite plural osane)

  1. fume, smoke
  2. reek, malodorousness
Related terms
  • osa, ose

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

os

  1. past tense of asa and ase
  2. imperative of osa and ose

Further reading

  • “os” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “os” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ansuz (god, deity), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ems- (engender, beget). Cognate with Old Norse áss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oːs/

Noun

ōs m (nominative plural ēse) (declension unknown)

  1. god
  2. the runic character (/o/ or /oː/)

Old French

Etymology

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os.

Noun

os m (oblique plural os, nominative singular os, nominative plural os)

  1. bone

Descendants

  • French: os

Old Saxon

Noun

os m

  1. Alternative form of as

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/

Noun

os f

  1. genitive plural of osa
    Synonym: ós

Portuguese

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese os, from Vulgar Latin *los, from Latin illōs.

Cognate of Spanish los.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /uʃ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /us/
    • (South Brazil) IPA(key): /os/
  • Hyphenation: os

Article

os

  1. masculine plural of o
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:o.

See also

Pronoun

os

  1. third-person plural direct objective personal pronoun; them
    Synonyms: (indirect objective) lhes, eles, (prepositional) elas
Usage notes
  • Becomes -los after verb forms ending in -r, -s, or -z, the pronouns nos and vos, and the adverb eis; the ending letter causing the change disappears.
    After ver:
    After pôs:
    After fiz:
    After nos:
    After eis:
  • Becomes -nos after a nasal diphthong: -ão, -am [ɐ̃w̃], -õe [õj̃], -em, -êm [ẽj̃].
  • In Brazil it is being abandoned in favor of the nominative form eles.
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:os.

See also

Etymology 2

Noun

os m

  1. plural of o

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone), *h₂óst. Compare Catalan os, French os, Italian osso, Portuguese osso, Sardinian ossu, Spanish hueso.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [os]
  • Rhymes: -os

Noun

os n (plural oase)

  1. bone

Declension

Related terms


Scottish Gaelic

Preposition

os

  1. (obsolete) over, above

Usage notes

  • Now used only in the compounds listed below.

Derived terms

  • os cionn
  • os ìosal
  • os làimh

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • ȏsa (Bosnian, Serbian)

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *osь

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ôːs/

Noun

ȏs f (Cyrillic spelling о̑с)

  1. (Croatia) axis

Declension


Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *osь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/

Noun

os f (genitive singular osi, nominative plural osi, genitive plural osí, declension pattern of kosť)

  1. axis (geometry: imaginary line)
  2. axle

Declension

Derived terms

  • osový
  • oska
  • osička

Further reading

  • os in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *osь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /óːs/

Noun

ọ̑s f

  1. axis (geometry: imaginary line)

Inflection

Further reading

  • os”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin vos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /os/, [os]
  • Homophone: hoz (non-Iberian)

Pronoun

os

  1. you, to you, for you; dative and accusative of vosotros

See also


Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

os n

  1. (uncountable) (bad) smell, especially a strong smell originating from cooking
  2. a river mouth; the place where a creek, stream or river enters into a lake
  3. indefinite genitive singular of o

Declension

See also

  • osa

Anagrams

  • SO, so

Volapük

Pronoun

os

  1. (impersonal pronoun) it

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/

Conjunction

os

  1. if (used with open conditions, i.e., those that are considered likely or plausible)
    Os ydw i'n iawn, felly rwyt ti'n mewn trafferth.- If I am right, then you are in trouble.

See also

  • pe (used with closed conditions)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • (Latin) a bone.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)