Pile in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does pile mean? Is pile a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is pile worth? pile how many points in Words With Friends? What does pile mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for pile

See how to calculate how many points for pile.

Is pile a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word pile is a Scrabble US word. The word pile is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

P3I1L1E1

Is pile a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word pile is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

P3I1L1E1

Is pile a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word pile is a Words With Friends word. The word pile is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

P4I1L2E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Pile

You can make 14 words from 'pile' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'pile'

LIPE 6PILE 6
PLIE 6 

3 letters words from 'pile'

LEI 3LEP 5
LIE 3LIP 5
PEL 5PIE 5

2 letters words from 'pile'

EL 2LI 2
PE 4PI 4

All 4 letters words made out of pile

pile iple plie lpie ilpe lipe piel ipel peil epil iepl eipl plei lpei peli epli lepi elpi ilep liep ielp eilp leip elip

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word pile. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in pile.

Definitions and meaning of pile

pile

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French pile, pille, from Latin pīla (pillar, pier).

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. A mass of things heaped together; a heap.
  2. (figuratively, informal) A group or list of related items up for consideration, especially in some kind of selection process.
  3. A mass formed in layers.
  4. A funeral pile; a pyre.
  5. (slang) A large amount of money.
    Synonyms: bundle, mint (both informal), small fortune (colloquial)
  6. A large building, or mass of buildings.
    • 1817, Walter Scott, Rob Roy, II.2:
      The pile is of a gloomy and massive, rather than of an elegant, style of Gothic architecture []
    • 1697, John Dryden, The Aeneid
      The pile o'erlooked the town and drew the fight.
    • 1892, Thomas Hardy, The Well-Beloved
      It was dark when the four-wheeled cab wherein he had brought Avice from the station stood at the entrance to the pile of flats of which Pierston occupied one floor []
  7. A bundle of pieces of wrought iron to be worked over into bars or other shapes by rolling or hammering at a welding heat; a fagot.
  8. A vertical series of alternate disks of two dissimilar metals (especially copper and zinc), laid up with disks of cloth or paper moistened with acid water between them, for producing a current of electricity; a voltaic pile, or galvanic pile.
  9. An atomic pile; an early form of nuclear reactor.
  10. (obsolete) The reverse (or tails) of a coin.
  11. (figuratively) A list or league
    • Watch Harlequins train and you get some idea of why they are back on top of the pile going into Saturday's rerun of last season's grand final against Leicester.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:lot
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive, often used with the preposition "up") To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate
  2. (transitive) To cover with heaps; or in great abundance; to fill or overfill; to load.
  3. (transitive) To add something to a great number.
  4. (transitive) (of vehicles) To create a hold-up.
  5. (transitive, military) To place (guns, muskets, etc.) together in threes so that they can stand upright, supporting each other.
Synonyms
  • (lay or throw into a pile): heap, pile up; see also Thesaurus:pile up
Translations

Related terms

Etymology 2

From Old English pīl, from Latin pīlum (heavy javelin). Cognate with Dutch pijl, German Pfeil. Doublet of pilum.

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. (obsolete) A dart; an arrow.
  2. The head of an arrow or spear.
  3. A large stake, or piece of pointed timber, steel etc., driven into the earth or sea-bed for the support of a building, a pier, or other superstructure, or to form a cofferdam, etc.
  4. (heraldry) One of the ordinaries or subordinaries having the form of a wedge, usually placed palewise, with the broadest end uppermost.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To drive piles into; to fill with piles; to strengthen with piles.
Translations

Etymology 3

Apparently from Late Latin pilus.

Noun

pile (plural piles)

  1. (usually in the plural) A hemorrhoid.
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English pile, partly from Anglo-Norman pil (a variant of peil, poil (hair)) and partly from its source, Latin pilus (hair). Doublet of pilus.

Noun

pile (countable and uncountable, plural piles)

  1. Hair, especially when very fine or short; the fine underfur of certain animals. (Formerly countable, now treated as a collective singular.)
  2. The raised hairs, loops or strands of a fabric; the nap of a cloth.
    • 1785, William Cowper, The Task
      Velvet soft, or plush with shaggy pile.
Translations

Verb

pile (third-person singular simple present piles, present participle piling, simple past and past participle piled)

  1. (transitive) To give a pile to; to make shaggy.

Anagrams

  • Lipe, Peil, Piel, plie, plié

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /piːlə/, [ˈpʰiːlə]

Noun

pile c

  1. indefinite plural of pil

French

Etymology

From Old French, from Latin pīla (through Italian pila for the “battery” sense). The “tail of a coin” sense is probably derived from previous senses, but it's not known for sure.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pil/

Noun

pile f (plural piles)

  1. heap, stack
  2. pillar
  3. battery
  4. tails
  5. (heraldry) pile

Derived terms

  • pile ou face

Descendants

  • Haitian Creole: anpil
  • Khmer: ពិល (pɨl)
  • Malagasy: pila
  • Rade: pil
  • Turkish: pil
  • Vietnamese: pin

Adverb

pile

  1. (colloquial) just, exactly
  2. (colloquial) dead (of stopping etc.); on the dot, sharp (of time), smack

Derived terms

  • pile-poil

Further reading

  • “pile” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • plie, plié

Friulian

Etymology 1

From Latin pīla (mortar).

Noun

pile f (plural pilis)

  1. basin
  2. mortar (vessel used to grind things)

Synonyms

  • (basin): vâs
  • (mortar): mortâr

Etymology 2

From Latin pīla (pillar).

Noun

pile f (plural pilis)

  1. pile (architecture)

Italian

Noun

pile m (invariable)

  1. fleece (all senses)

Noun

pile f

  1. plural of pila

Anagrams

  • peli

Latin

Noun

pile

  1. vocative singular of pilus

Latvian

Noun

pile f (5th declension)

  1. drip
  2. dribble (a small amount of a liquid)
  3. drop

Declension


Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʲilɛ/, [ˈpʲilə]

Noun

pile

  1. inflection of piła:
    1. dative/locative singular
    2. nominative/accusative dual

Middle English

Noun

pile

  1. Alternative form of pilwe

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʲi.lɛ/

Noun

pile f

  1. dative/locative singular of piła

Portuguese

Verb

pile

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of pilar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of pilar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of pilar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of pilar

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pilę (chick); but also a *pisklę is reconstructed related to *piskati (to utter shrilly).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pîle/
  • Hyphenation: pi‧le

Noun

pȉle n (Cyrillic spelling пи̏ле)

  1. chick

Declension

See also

  • kokoš
  • pijevac / pevac
  • pileći gulaš

Verb

pile (Cyrillic spelling пиле)

  1. third-person plural present of piliti

Spanish

Verb

pile

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of pilar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of pilar.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to lay one upon the other.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)