Arm in Scrabble Dictionary

What does arm mean? Is arm a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is arm worth? arm how many points in Words With Friends? What does arm mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for arm

See how to calculate how many points for arm.

Is arm a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word arm is a Scrabble US word. The word arm is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

A1R1M3

Is arm a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word arm is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

A1R1M3

Is arm a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word arm is a Words With Friends word. The word arm is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1R1M4

Our tools

Valid words made from Arm

You can make 6 words from 'arm' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'arm'

ARM 5MAR 5
RAM 5 

2 letters words from 'arm'

AM 4AR 2
MA 4 

All 3 letters words made out of arm

arm ram amr mar rma mra

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word arm. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in arm.

Definitions and meaning of arm

arm

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: äm, IPA(key): /ɑːm/
  • (US) enPR: ärm, IPA(key): /ɑɹm/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(r)m

Etymology 1

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm) Old English arm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint; arm, forequarter), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together).

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. The portion of the upper human appendage, from the shoulder to the wrist and sometimes including the hand.
  2. (anatomy) The extended portion of the upper limb, from the shoulder to the elbow.
  3. A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.
  4. A long, narrow, more or less rigid part of an object extending from the main part or centre of the object, such as the arm of an armchair, a crane, a pair of spectacles or a pair of compasses.
  5. (geography) A bay or inlet off a main body of water.
  6. A branch of an organization.
  7. (figuratively) Power; might; strength; support.
    • Bible, Isa. lii. 1
      To whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?
  8. (baseball, slang) A pitcher
  9. (genetics) One of the two parts of a chromosome.
  10. A group of patients in a medical trial.
Derived terms
Translations

See arm/translations § Noun.

Verb

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. (obsolete) To take by the arm; to take up in one's arms.
    • 1634, attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare, The Two Noble Kinsmen
      Arm your prize; / I know you will not lose him.

Etymology 2

From Middle English arm (poor, wretched), from Old English earm (poor, miserable, pitiful, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective

arm (comparative armer or more arm, superlative armest or most arm)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Poor; lacking in riches or wealth.
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To be pitied; pitiful; wretched.
References
  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language
Derived terms
  • armth

Etymology 3

Back-formation from arms (plural), from Middle English armes, from Old French armes, from Latin arma (weapons), from Proto-Indo-European *ar-mo-, a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to fit together), hence ultimately cognate with etymology 1.

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. (usually used in the plural) A weapon.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The next thing I laid hold of was a brace of pistols, and as I already had a powder horn and bullets, I felt myself well supplied with arms.
  2. (in the plural) Heraldic bearings or insignia.
  3. (in the plural, obsolete) War; hostilities; deeds or exploits of war.
Usage notes
  • Pubs and taverns often use this word in their names, as a reference to heraldic bearings, e.g. The Queen's Arms.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:weapon
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. (transitive) To supply with armour or (later especially) weapons.
    The king armed his knights with swords and shields.
  2. (transitive) To prepare a tool or a weapon for action; to activate.
  3. (transitive) To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To furnish with means of defence; to prepare for resistance; to fortify, in a moral sense.
    • Bible, 1 Peter iv. 1
      Arm yourselves [] with the same mind.
  5. (intransitive) To take up weapons; to arm oneself.
  6. (transitive) To fit (a magnet) with an armature.
Synonyms
  • (furnish with weapons): beweapon
Derived terms
  • arm to the teeth
Translations

Anagrams

  • -mar-, AMR, MAR, MRA, Mar, Mar., RAM, RMA, Ram, mar, mar-, ram

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch arm.

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm

Cimbrian

Etymology 1

From Middle High German arm, from Old High German arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm). Cognate with German Arm, English arm.

Noun

arm m (plural èrme)

  1. (Sette Comuni) arm
Related terms
  • èrmel

Etymology 2

From Middle High German arm, from Old High German arm, from Proto-West Germanic *arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor, pitiful). Cognate with German arm, English arm.

Adjective

arm (comparative èrmor, superlative dar èrmorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni, Luserna) poor
Declension

This adjective has irregular declension; positive inflected forms also have umlaut.

Derived terms
  • armakhot, èrmakhot
  • èrmar stòkh

References

  • “arm” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “arm” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arm/, [ɑːˀm]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ar-mo- (arm).

Noun

arm c (singular definite armen, plural indefinite arme)

  1. (anatomy) arm
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Old Norse armr (arm, poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor).

Adjective

arm

  1. (dated) poor, not rich
    Synonym: fattig
  2. unfortunate, poor
    Synonym: stakkels

Inflection

Further reading

  • arm on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da
  • Arm (flertydig) on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑrm/
  • Hyphenation: arm
  • Rhymes: -ɑrm

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together). Cognate to Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬨𐬀(arma) and Old Persian [script needed] (arma).

Noun

arm m (plural armen, diminutive armpje n)

  1. arm
  2. branch (especially of streams and organisations)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: arm

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse).

Adjective

arm (comparative armer, superlative armst)

  1. poor (not rich)
  2. poor (unfortunate)
Inflection
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: arm

Anagrams

  • ram

Estonian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Finnic *arpi; arm is an irregular variant of the root; the expected arb can be seen in dialects.

Noun

arm (genitive armi, partitive armi)

  1. scar

Declension

Etymology 2

Most likely derived from armas. Cognate to Votic armo (grace, mercy).

Noun

arm (genitive armu, partitive armu)

  1. mercy

Declension


German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse) or alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *h₃erbʰ-, whence English orphan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʔaʁm]

Adjective

arm (comparative ärmer, superlative am ärmsten)

  1. poor (having little money)
  2. poor (to be pitied)
  3. low (having a small amount)

Declension

Antonyms

  • reich

Derived terms

Related terms

Further reading

  • arm in Duden online

Icelandic

Noun

arm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of armur

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Pronunciation

  • (Munster, Aran) IPA(key): /ˈɑɾˠəmˠ/
  • (Connemara, Mayo, Ulster) IPA(key): /ˈaɾˠəmˠ/

Noun

arm m (genitive singular airm, nominative plural airm)

  1. weapon; implement, tool
  2. (collective) arms
  3. army

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • "arm" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “arm”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “arm” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 40.
  • Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 10.
  • Entries containing “arm” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “arm” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Jersey Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz. Cognate with Dutch arm (poor), German arm (poor).

Adjective

arm

  1. poor
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hai waz nît tevrêde täus en dârkîs tû râkni arm. [] |He was not content at home and therefore he became poor.

Livonian

Etymology

Akin to Finnish armas.

Noun

arm

  1. peace
  2. love

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Noun

arm m (genitive singular arm, plural armyn)

  1. arm, weapon, armament

Verb

arm (verbal noun armal, past participle garmal)

  1. arm

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “arm”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arm/

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun

arm m

  1. arm
Alternative forms
  • ārem
  • āerm
Inflection
Descendants
  • Dutch: arm
    • Afrikaans: arm
  • Limburgish: erm
Further reading
  • “arm (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “arm (I)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Etymology 2

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective

arm

  1. poor, having few possessions
  2. unfortunate, pitiable
Inflection
Alternative forms
  • ārem
Descendants
  • Dutch: arm
  • Limburgish: erm
Further reading
  • “arm (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “arm (II)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
Descendants
  • Scots: arm, airm, arme, harme, areme, airme
  • English: arm

Etymology 2

From Old English earm (poor, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective

arm

  1. poor
  2. miserable, wretched

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse armr.

Adjective

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor

Noun

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armer, definite plural armene)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

Derived terms

References

  • “arm” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑrm/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse armr.

Adjective

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor, pitiful (to be pitied)
Derived terms
  • arming

Etymology 2

From Old Norse armr. Akin to English arm.

Noun

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armar, definite plural armane)

  1. (anatomy) an arm
Derived terms

References

  • “arm” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Noun

arm m

  1. arm
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants
  • Middle Dutch: arm
    • Dutch: arm
Further reading
  • “arm (I)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *armaz.

Adjective

arm

  1. poor
Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms
  • armo
Descendants
  • Middle Dutch: arm
    • Dutch: arm
Further reading
  • “arm (II)”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Alternative forms

  • earm

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), whence also Old High German arm, Old Norse armr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑrm/, [ɑrˠm]

Noun

arm m

  1. arm
Declension

Old High German

Alternative forms

  • aram

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arm/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos, whence also Old English arm, Old Norse armr.

Noun

arm m

  1. (anatomy) arm

Declension

Descendants
  • Middle High German: arm, arn
    • Alemannic German: Aare, Arm, Are, Arme
    • Bavarian: Oarm
      Cimbrian: arm
    • Central Franconian: Ärm, Arm, Orm
      Hunsrik: Aarem
    • German: Arm
    • Luxembourgish: Aarm
    • Rhine Franconian:
      • Pennsylvania German: Aarm
    • Yiddish: אָרעם(orem)

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective

arm

  1. poor, miserable
Descendants
  • German: arm

References

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old Saxon

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Noun

arm m

  1. arm
Declension


Descendants
  • Middle Low German: arm
    • Low German:
      • German Low German:
        Hamburgisch: Arm
      • Westphalian:
        Ravensbergisch-Lippisch: Ārm
        Sauerländisch: Ārm, Ārem, Oarm
        Westmünsterländisch: Arm
    • Plautdietsch: Oam, Oarm

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

Adjective

arm (comparative armoro, superlative armost)

  1. miserable, poor
Declension


Descendants
  • Low German: arm

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin armus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂er- (to join).

Noun

arm n (plural armuri)

  1. (chiefly Oltenia) an animal's haunch, or a thigh on a person
    Synonyms: coapsă, șold

Related terms

  • întrema

See also

  • armă
  • spată

Scots

Etymology 1

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Alternative forms

  • airm, arme, harme, areme, airme

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
  2. arm of the sea
  3. bar, beam

Etymology 2

From Middle English arm (poor), from Old English earm (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

Adjective

arm (comparative mair arm, superlative maist arm)

  1. poor; wretched
  2. weak; thin; sickly

Verb

arm (third-person singular present arms, present participle armin, past armt, past participle armt)

  1. (intransitive) to crawl about miserably.

Etymology 3

From Middle English armen (to arm), from Old French armer (to arm), from Latin armō (to arm). More at arm.

Verb

arm (third-person singular present arms, present participle armin, past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to arm, outfit with weapons or armour

Etymology 4

From Old Norse armr (wing of a body).

Noun

arm (plural arms)

  1. the tail end of something, especially of fishing line

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaɾam/

Noun

arm m (genitive singular airm, plural airm)

  1. army
    Synonym: armailt
  2. arm, weapon

Usage notes

  • Arm is usually used to refer to the entire fighting force of a nation etc, while armailt usually refers to the an "army" involved in a particular battle etc:

Derived terms

  • taigh-airm

Related terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • “arm” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “arm”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos.

Noun

arm c

  1. (anatomy) arm; the body part
  2. arm; something extending from a body
Declension
Derived terms

See also

Etymology 2

From Old Norse armr (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos.

Adjective

arm

  1. (dated) poor; to be pitied
  2. (dated) poor; with no possessions or money
Declension
Derived terms
  • utarma

Anagrams

  • mar, ram

Yimas

Noun

arm

  1. water

References

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN) (as arɨm)
  • William A. Foley, The Yimas Language of New Guinea (1991, →ISBN), page 296:
    arm tark kantk-rm ima-na-tɨ-n
    water coldness with-water water S-DEF-becomes-PRES
    'The water is getting cold.'

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to supply with weapons.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)