Cha in Scrabble Dictionary

What does cha mean? Is cha a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is cha worth? cha how many points in Words With Friends? What does cha mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for cha

See how to calculate how many points for cha.

Is cha a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cha is a Scrabble US word. The word cha is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

C3H4A1

Is cha a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cha is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

C3H4A1

Is cha a Words With Friends word?

The word cha is NOT a Words With Friends word.

Our tools

Valid words made from Cha

You can make 5 words from 'cha' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'cha'

ACH 8CHA 8

2 letters words from 'cha'

AH 5CH 7
HA 5 

All 3 letters words made out of cha

cha hca cah ach hac ahc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cha. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cha.

Definitions and meaning of cha

cha

Etymology 1

From Chinese (chá), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s-la, via two routes: in some cases from Hindi चा () / Urdu چا() (a variant of the same root, from Persian چا‎, which led to chai), from Northern Chinese; in other cases from /t͡sʰɑː²¹/, the pronunciation found in Canton (Guangzhou), where the British bought much of their tea in the 19th century. Doublet of tea, which is from the Amoy Min Nan pronunciation .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃɑː/

Noun

cha (uncountable)

  1. tea, sometimes (dialect) specifically masala chai
Synonyms
  • tea
Related terms
  • chai
  • char

Etymology 2

Eye dialect spelling of you, especially when preceded by a t sound.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃə/

Pronoun

cha

  1. (dialectal, nonstandard) You.
    • 1976, Flying Magazine, page 34
      You mean you can't fly after you've had a few beers? You can drive, can't cha?
    • 2008, Barbara L. Jent, The Weddin' Day, Barbara Jent →ISBN, page 157
      “You'll be ridin' with us, won't cha, Josh?”
Derived terms
  • dincha
  • doncha
  • gotcha

Etymology 3

From cha-cha (q.v.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʃɑː/

Particle

cha

  1. (dancing) Used to count out steps, particularly involving the hip-shaking sections of rhythmic Latin dances
    One–two–chachacha
    Three–four–chachacha

Etymology 4

From the McCune-Reischauer romanization of Korean (ja).

Noun

cha (plural chas or cha)

  1. (Korean units of measure) Synonym of Korean foot: a traditional unit of length equivalent to about 30.3 cm.

Anagrams

  • ACH, CAH, HAC, HCA, ach, cah

Alemannic German

Alternative forms

  • cheemen, cheme, cho, chomu, choo, chéeme

Etymology

From Old High German kweman, chuman, from Proto-Germanic *kwemaną. Cognate with German kommen, Dutch komen, English come, Icelandic koma, Gothic 𐌵𐌹𐌼𐌰𐌽 (qiman).

Verb

cha

  1. (Uri) to come

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • ubercha

References

  • Abegg, Emil, (1911) Die Mundart von Urseren (Beiträge zur Schweizerdeutschen Grammatik. IV.) [The Dialect of Urseren], Frauenfeld, Switzerland: Huber & Co., page 86.

Irish

Etymology

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from ní con.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xa/

Particle

cha (Triggers lenition of b, c, f, g, m, p, s. Triggers eclipsis of d, t.)

  1. (Ulster) not

Usage notes

Used only in some varieties of Ulster Irish. Not used with the future tense; a future meaning can be conveyed by using it with the present tense.

Synonyms

  • (used in Munster Irish, Connacht Irish, and some varieties of Ulster Irish)

Related terms

  • chan (used before vowel sounds)
  • char (used before the past tense)

References

  • "cha" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “nícon”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Japanese

Romanization

cha

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ちゃ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of チャ

Kapampangan

Etymology

From Chinese , highly likely via Cantonese caa4 rather than Hokkien .

Noun

cha

  1. tea

Mandarin

Romanization

cha

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chā.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chá.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǎ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chà.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Manx

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from ní con. Compare Irish , cha, Scottish Gaelic cha

Particle

cha

  1. not

Usage notes

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

Etymology 2

Adverb

cha

  1. Alternative form of cho

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “nícon”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Navajo

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t͡ʃʰɑ̀]

Noun

cha

  1. crying, weeping

Pali

Alternative forms

Numeral

cha

  1. six

Declension

Optionally indeclinable.

References

cha in Pali Text Society (1921–1925), Pali-English Dictionary, London: Chipstead. (licensed under CC-BY-NC)


Pipil

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): /ˈt͡ʃa/

Verb

-cha

  1. Clipping of -chiwa.

Romansch

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Conjunction

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) that

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) ca, c'
  • (Surmiran) tgi

Pronoun

cha

  1. (Puter, Vallader) who, whom

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) che
  • (Sutsilvan) tge
  • (Surmiran) tgi

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Middle Irish níco(n), noco(n), nocho(n), nocha(n), from Old Irish nícon, nacon, from ní con.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xa/

Particle

cha

  1. not

Usage notes

  • Used with the dependent form of a verb. With the copula, the verb may be suppressed.
  • Becomes chan before a vowel.

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “nícon”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swahili

Verb

-cha (infinitive kucha)

  1. to dawn, (of the sun) to rise
    Antonym: -chwa
  2. to fear, be afraid

Usage notes

In Standard Swahili, the sense "to fear" is used of reverential fear, generally fearing God. However, in the Mombasa dialect, it is used as a synonym of -ogopa.

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • Verbal derivations:
    • Applicative: -chea
    • Passive: -chewa

Particle

cha

  1. Ki class inflected form of -a.

Usage notes

  1. The particle follows class 7 nouns to form a genitival relation of a noun that follows it, often corresponding to of in English:

Swazi

Interjection

cha

  1. no

Vietnamese

Etymology

Compare Limchowese (zaa1, “father”)

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [t͡ɕaː˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [t͡ɕaː˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [caː˧˧]

Noun

cha • (乍, 吒, 𤕔)

  1. (dated or literary or Catholicism) a father
  2. (Southern Vietnam, humorous) a dude
    Synonym: bố

Pronoun

cha

  1. (dated or literary) I/me, your father
  2. (dated or literary) you, my father
  3. (Catholicism) you, father

Derived terms

  • cha nội
  • thằng cha

See also

  • chả
  • ba
  • bọ
  • bố
  • cậu
  • thầy
  • tía

Further reading

  • "cha" in Hồ Ngọc Đức, Free Vietnamese Dictionary Project (details)

Welsh

Verb

cha

  1. Aspirate mutation of ca.

Mutation


Western Apache

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [tʃa]

Noun

cha

  1. beaver

Zulu

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ǀʰá/

Interjection

cha

  1. no
    Synonym: qha

References

  • C. M. Doke; B. W. Vilakazi (1972), “cha”, in Zulu-English Dictionary, →ISBN: “cha (2)”

Source: wiktionary.org
  • (colloquial) tea.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)