See in Scrabble Dictionary

What does see mean? Is see a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is see worth? see how many points in Words With Friends? What does see mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for see

See how to calculate how many points for see.

Is see a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word see is a Scrabble US word. The word see is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

S1E1E1

Is see a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word see is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

S1E1E1

Is see a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word see is a Words With Friends word. The word see is worth 3 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1E1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from See

You can make 3 words from 'see' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'see'

SEE 3 

2 letters words from 'see'

EE 2ES 2

All 3 letters words made out of see

see ese see ese ees ees

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word see. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in see.

Definitions and meaning of see

see

Pronunciation

  • enPR: , IPA(key): /siː/
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophones: C, cee, sea, Seay

Etymology 1

From Middle English seen, from Old English sēon (to see, look, behold, perceive, observe, discern, understand, know), from Proto-Germanic *sehwaną (to see), from Proto-Indo-European *sekʷ- (to see, notice). Cognate with West Frisian sjen (to see), Dutch zien (to see), Low German sehn, German sehen (to see), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian Bokmål se (to see), Norwegian Nynorsk sjå (to see), and more distantly with Latin sīgnum (sign, token), Albanian shih (look at, see) imperative of shoh (to see).

Verb

see (third-person singular simple present sees, present participle seeing, simple past saw or (dialectal) seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed, past participle seen or (dialectal) seent or (dialectal) seed)

  1. (stative) To perceive or detect with the eyes, or as if by sight.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      I want to see this house!
    1. To witness or observe by personal experience.
      Hyponyms: experience, suffer
      • Template:rfdatel, John 8:51
        Verily, verily, I say unto you, if a man keep my saying, he shall never see death.
      • [] And remember this, 'scapegallows,' said Ralph, menacing him with his hand, 'that if we meet again, and you so much as notice me by one begging gesture, you shall see the inside of a jail once more []
    2. To watch (a movie) at a cinema, or a show on television etc.
  2. To form a mental picture of.
    1. (figuratively) To understand.
    2. To come to a realization of having been mistaken or misled.
    3. (transitive) To foresee, predict, or prophesy.
    4. (used in the imperative) Used to emphasise a proposition.
  3. (social) To meet, to visit.
    1. To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit.
      • Bible, 1 Samuel 15:35
        And Samuel came no more to see Saul until the day of his death.
    2. To date frequently.
    3. To visit for a medical appointment.
  4. (transitive) To be the setting or time of.
  5. (by extension) To ensure that something happens, especially while witnessing it.
  6. (transitive) To wait upon; attend, escort.
  7. (gambling, transitive) To respond to another player's bet with a bet of equal value.
  8. To determine by trial or experiment; to find out (if or whether).
  9. (used in the imperative) To reference or to study for further details.
  10. To include as one of something's experiences.
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (perceive with the eyes): behold, descry, espy, observe, view
  • (understand): follow, get, understand
  • (date frequently): go out; see also Thesaurus:date
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

see

  1. Directing the audience to pay attention to the following
    Synonyms: behold, look; see also Thesaurus:lo
  2. Introducing an explanation
    Synonyms: look, well, so
Translations

See also

  • look
  • sight
  • watch

Etymology 2

From Middle English se, see, from Old French sie (seat, throne; town, capital; episcopal see), from Latin sedes (seat), referring to the bishop's throne or chair (compare seat of power) in the cathedral; related to the Latin verb sedere (to sit).

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. a diocese, archdiocese; a region of a church, generally headed by a bishop, especially an archbishop.
  2. The office of a bishop or archbishop; bishopric or archbishopric
  3. A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Jove laughed on Venus from his sovereign see.
Related terms
Derived terms
  • Holy See
Translations

See also

  • cathedra
  • cathedral
  • chair
  • throne

Further reading

  • see on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • -ese, ESE, ees, ese

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch zee, from Middle Dutch sêe, from Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sɪə], [zɪə]

Noun

see (plural seë)

  1. sea

Estonian

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *se, ultimately from Proto-Uralic *śe. cognate to Finnish se, Votic se, Erzya се (se, this, that), Khanty [script needed] (śi, that over yonder; now, then), and Nganasan [script needed] (sete, he/she).

Pronoun

see (genitive selle, partitive seda)

  1. this
  2. it
  3. (colloquial, somewhat rude) he, she (usually only used when said person is not present)

Declension

See also

  • kes
  • mis

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː/, [ˈs̠e̞ː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Syllabification: see

Etymology 1

Compare Swedish ce, English cee.

Alternative forms

  • cee

Noun

see

  1. cee (The name of the Latin-script letter C.)
Usage notes
  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of c-kirjain ("letter C, letter c") instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural. The plural forms may get confused with sei (saithe).
Declension
Synonyms
  • c-kirjain

Etymology 2

< seitsemän

Numeral

see

  1. (colloquial, counting) seven

See also

  • seitsemän (seven)

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • siee

Etymology

From the verb seâ. Compare Italian sega, Venetian siega, French scie.

Noun

see f (plural seis)

  1. saw

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch sēo, from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Noun

sêe f or m

  1. sea

Inflection

Descendants

  • Dutch: zee
    • Afrikaans: see
    • Sranan Tongo: se
    • Saramaccan:
  • Limburgish: zieë
  • West Flemish: zji, zêe

Further reading

  • “see”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “see (I)”, in Middelniederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English , from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Alternative forms

  • se, , ce, sea, sei, ze

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛː/, /seː/
  • Rhymes: -ɛː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. sea, ocean
  2. A body of water, a lake
Related terms
  • Rede See
Descendants
  • English: sea
  • Scots: se, see, sey, seye, sie
  • Yola: zea
References
  • “sē (n.(1))” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

Etymology 2

From Old French sei, from Latin sedes.

Alternative forms

  • se, ce, cee

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/
  • Rhymes: -eː

Noun

see (plural sees)

  1. seat, chair
  2. dwelling, residence
  3. A royal or episcopal chair
  4. A royal or episcopal polity or realm
  5. A royal or episcopal residence
  6. (Christianity) The Kingdom of Heaven.
Descendants
  • English: see
References
  • “sē (n.(2))” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-09.

North Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz. Cognates include Dutch zee.

Noun

see m (plural seen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) lake

Tetum

Verb

see

  1. to turn, to present

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *saiwiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /seː/

Noun

see c (plural seeën, diminutive seeke)

  1. sea

Derived terms

  • seehûn
  • seeko
  • seerôver

Further reading

  • “see”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SEDULOUSNESS, the state of being sedulous.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)