Trot in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does trot mean? Is trot a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is trot worth? trot how many points in Words With Friends? What does trot mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for trot

See how to calculate how many points for trot.

Is trot a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word trot is a Scrabble US word. The word trot is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

T1R1O1T1

Is trot a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word trot is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

T1R1O1T1

Is trot a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word trot is a Words With Friends word. The word trot is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

T1R1O1T1

Our tools

Valid words made from Trot

You can make 8 words from 'trot' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'trot'

TORT 4TROT 4

3 letters words from 'trot'

ORT 3ROT 3
TOR 3TOT 3

2 letters words from 'trot'

OR 2TO 2

All 4 letters words made out of trot

trot rtot tort otrt rott ortt trto rtto ttro ttro rtto trto totr ottr ttor ttor ottr totr rott ortt rtot trot otrt tort

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word trot. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in trot.

Definitions and meaning of trot

trot

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɹɑt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɹɒt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Etymology 1

From Middle English trotten, from Old French trotter, troter (to go, trot), from Medieval Latin *trottō, *trotō (to go), from Frankish *trottōn (to go, run), from Proto-Germanic *trudōną, *trudaną, *tradjaną (to go, step, tread), from Proto-Indo-European *dreh₂- (to run, escape). Cognate with Old High German trottōn (to run), Modern German trotten (to trot, plod), Gothic 𐍄𐍂𐌿𐌳𐌰𐌽 (trudan, to tread), Old Norse troða (to walk, tread), Old English tredan (to step, tread). Doublet of tread.

Noun

trot (plural trots)

  1. (archaic, derogatory) An ugly old woman, a hag. [From 1362.]
  2. (chiefly of horses) A gait of a four-legged animal between walk and canter, a diagonal gait (in which diagonally opposite pairs of legs move together).
    • 2000, Margaret H. Bonham, Introduction to: Dog Agility, page 14,
      Dogs have a variety of gaits. Most dogs have the walk, trot, pace, and gallop.
    • 2008, Kenneth W. Hinchcliff, Andris J. Kaneps, Raymond J. Geor, Equine Exercise Physiology: The Science of Exercise in the Athletic Horse, Elsevier, page 154,
      The toelt is comfortable for the rider because the amplitude of the dorsoventral displacement is lower than at the trot. [] The slow trot is a two-beat symmetric diagonal gait. Among the normal variations of the trot of saddle horses, the speed of the gait increases from collected to extended trot.
    • 2009, Gordon Wright, George H. Morris, Learning To Ride, Hunt, And Show, page 65,
      To assume the correct position for the posting trot, first walk, with the body inclined forward in a posting position. Then put the horse into a slow or sitting trot at six miles an hour. Do not post.
  3. A gait of a person or animal faster than a walk but slower than a run.
  4. A brisk journey or progression.
    We often take the car and have a trot down to the beach.
    In this lesson we'll have a quick trot through Chapter 3 before moving on to Chapter 4.
  5. A toddler. [From 1854.]
    • 1855, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Newcomes, 1869, The Works of William Makepeace Thackeray, Volume V: The Newcomes, Volume I, page 123,
      [] but Ethel romped with the little children — the rosy little trots — and took them on her knees, and told them a thousand stories.
  6. (obsolete) A young animal. [From 1895.]
  7. (dance) A moderately rapid dance.
  8. (Australia, obsolete) A succession of heads thrown in a game of two-up.
  9. (Australia, New Zealand, with "good" or "bad") A run of luck or fortune.
    He′s had a good trot, but his luck will end soon.
    • 1994, Noel Virtue, Sandspit Crossing, page 34,
      It was to be a hugely special occasion, for apart from the picture shows at the Majestic, there was usually nothing at all going on in Sandspit to make anyone think they were on a good trot living there.
    • 2004, John Mosig, Ric Fallu, Australian Fish Farmer: A Practical Guide to Aquaculture, 2nd Edition, page 21,
      Should he or she be having a bad trot, the exchange rate will be higher than normal.
  10. (dated, slang, among students) Synonym of horse (illegitimate study aid)
  11. (informal, as 'the trots') Diarrhoea.
    He's got a bad case of the trots and has to keep running off to the toilet.
Synonyms
  • (gait of an animal between walk and canter):
  • (ugly old woman): See Thesaurus:old woman
  • (gait of a person faster than a walk): jog
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

trot (third-person singular simple present trots, present participle trotting, simple past and past participle trotted)

  1. (intransitive) To move along briskly; specifically, to move at a pace between a walk and a run.
    I didn't want to miss my bus, so I trotted the last few hundred yards to the stop.
    The dog trotted along obediently by his master's side.
    • 1927-29, M.K. Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, translated 1940 by Mahadev Desai, Part I, Chapter xiv:
      I would trot ten or twelve miles each day, go into a cheap restaurant and eat my fill of bread, but would never be satisfied. During these wanderings I once hit on a vegetarian restaurant in Farringdon Street. The sight of it filled me with the same joy that a child feels on getting a thing after its own heart.
    • c. 1920s-1930s, Charlotte Druitt Cole, Runaway Jane:
      They sent little Jane to the garden to play,
      But she opened the gate, and then trotted away
      Under the hawthorns and down the green lane,
      Bad little, mad little, runaway Jane!
  2. (intransitive, of a horse) To move at a gait between a walk and a canter.
  3. (transitive) To cause to move, as a horse or other animal, in the pace called a trot; to cause to run without galloping or cantering.
Synonyms
  • (to walk rapidly): jog, pace
    • See also Thesaurus:walk, Thesaurus:run
Derived terms
  • hot to trot
  • strong enough to trot a mouse on
Translations

Etymology 2

Short for foxtrot, whose rhythms influenced the genre.

Noun

trot (uncountable)

  1. A genre of Korean pop music employing repetitive rhythm and vocal inflections.
Synonyms
  • ppongjjak

Etymology 3

Noun

trot (plural trots)

  1. (derogatory, properly Trot) Clipping of Trotskyist.

References

Anagrams

  • -tort, ROTT, Rott, TRTO, tort

French

Etymology

From Old French trot, troter, from Medieval Latin trottare, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁo/

Noun

trot m (plural trots)

  1. trot

Further reading

  • “trot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tort

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English trotten, from Old French trotter, troter (to go, trot), from Medieval Latin *trottō, *trotō (to go), from Frankish *trottōn (to go, run), from Proto-Germanic *trudōną, *trudaną, *tradjaną (to go, step, tread), from Proto-Indo-European *dreh₂- (to run, escape).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [trɔt], [trot]

Verb

trot (third-person singular present trots, present participle trottin, past trottit, past participle trottit)

  1. to move at a quick steady pace
  2. (of water) to flow rapidly and noisily, purl, ripple

Derived terms

  • (Ulster) trottle-caur (a low vehicle for moving hay)

Noun

trot (plural trots)

  1. a short, quick pace
  2. the fall, angle, or run on a drain

Derived terms

  • jeoparty trot (a quick motion between running and walking)
  • job-trot (a slow, monotonous or easy going pace, the settled routine or way of doing things)
  • short in the trot (short-tempered)

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *trǫtъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tróːt/

Noun

trọ̑t m anim

  1. drone (male bee)

Inflection

Further reading

  • trot”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English throat.

Noun

trot

  1. throat

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a taxis in which an organism orients itself by the simultaneous comparison of stimuli of different intensity operating on different end organs.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)