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Cor in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does cor mean? Is cor a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is cor worth? cor how many points in Words With Friends? What does cor mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for cor

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Is cor a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word cor is a Scrabble US word. The word cor is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

C3O1R1

Is cor a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word cor is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

C3O1R1

Is cor a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word cor is a Words With Friends word. The word cor is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

C4O1R1

Our tools

Valid words made from Cor

You can make 4 words from 'cor' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'cor'

COR 5ORC 5
ROC 5 

2 letters words from 'cor'

OR 2 

All 3 letters words made out of cor

cor ocr cro rco orc roc

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word cor. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in cor.

Definitions and meaning of cor

cor

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Canada) IPA(key): /kɔɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kɔː/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophones: caw (non-rhotic accents only), corps, core (in accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

A minced oath or dialectal variant of God.

Interjection

cor

  1. (Cockney Britain) Expression of surprise.
    • Cor blimey!
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:wow

Etymology 2

From Biblical Hebrew כֹּר(kōr)

Alternative forms

  • kor, core

Noun

cor (plural cors)

  1. (historical units of measure) Various former units of volume, particularly:
    1. A Hebrew unit of liquid volume, about equal to 230 L or 60 gallons.
    2. Synonym of homer: approximately the same volume as a dry measure.
    3. A roughly equivalent Phoenician unit of volume.
Synonyms
  • homer, omer
Meronyms
  • (liquid volume): log (1720 cor); cab, kab (1180 cor); hin (160 cor); bath (110 cor)
  • (dry volume): See homer

Further reading

  • "Weights and Measures" at Oxford Biblical Studies Online

Anagrams

  • CRO, OCR, ORC, ROC, orc, roc

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈkɔr/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɾ/

Etymology 1

From Old Occitan cor, from Latin cor, from Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-.

Noun

cor m (plural cors)

  1. heart
Derived terms
  • amb l'ai al cor
  • dir-ho de tot cor (to say it with all the heart; to be sincere)
  • veure's amb cor
See also

Etymology 2

Probably borrowed from Latin chorus (14th century), from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós).

Noun

cor m (plural cors)

  1. chorus

French

Etymology

From Old French cor, corn, from Latin cornu, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔʁ/

Noun

cor m (plural cors)

  1. horn (musical instrument)
  2. corn (of the foot)

Derived terms

  • à cor et à cri

Related terms

  • cornu

Further reading

  • “cor” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • roc

Galician

Alternative forms

  • color

Etymology

From Old Portuguese coor, from Latin color, colōrem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /koːɾ/

Noun

cor f (plural cores)

  1. color, hue

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish cor (act of putting), verbal noun of fo·ceird (to put).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔɾˠ/

Noun

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural cora or coranna)

  1. twist, turn, turning movement
  2. (fishing) cast; haul from cast
  3. (music) lively turn; lively air
  4. (dance) reel

Declension

  • Alternative plural: coranna

Derived terms

Noun

cor m (genitive singular coir, nominative plural coir)

  1. agreement, contract; guarantee, pledge

Declension

Noun

cor m (genitive singular coir)

  1. verbal noun of coir
  2. tiredness, exhaustion

Declension

Verb

cor (present analytic corann, future analytic corfaidh, verbal noun coradh, past participle cortha)

  1. turn

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • cas

Derived terms

  • feoil chortha f (tainted meat)

Mutation

Further reading

  • "cor" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 cor”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Istriot

Alternative forms

  • core, cour

Etymology

From Latin cor. Cognate with Catalan cor.

Noun

cor m

  1. heart

Italian

Noun

cor m

  1. Apocopic form of cuore

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *kord, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr ~ *ḱr̥d-. Cognate with Ancient Greek καρδίᾱ (kardíā), Proto-Germanic *hertô, Sanskrit हृदय (hṛdaya), Hittite 𒆠𒅕 (kir), Proto-Slavic *sьrdьce (heart).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /kor/, [kɔr]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /kor/, [kɔr]

Noun

cor n (genitive cordis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) heart
  2. (figurative) soul, mind

Declension

Third-declension noun (neuter, i-stem).

Derived terms

Descendants

References

  • cor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin cornu.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔr/
  • Rhymes: -ɔr

Noun

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. horn (instrument used to produce sound)

Synonyms

  • buisine
  • corne

Descendants

  • French: cor

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *koros (casting, a throw), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (to turn)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kor/

Noun

cor m (genitive cuir, no plural)

  1. verbal noun of fo·ceird

Inflection

Mutation


Old Occitan

Etymology

From Latin cor.

Noun

cor m (oblique plural cors, nominative singular cors, nominative plural cor)

  1. heart (organ which pumps blood)
  2. heart (metaphorically, human emotion)

Related terms

  • coratge

Descendants

  • Catalan: cor
  • Occitan: còr

Portuguese

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese coor, from Latin color, colōrem, from Old Latin colos (covering), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱel- (to cover, conceal).

Alternative forms

  • côr (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈkoɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkoʁ/, [ˈkoχ]
  • Hyphenation: cor
  • Rhymes: -oɾ

Noun

cor f (plural cores)

  1. colour (Commonwealth English), color (American English)
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:cor.

Related terms
  • corar
  • colorar
  • colorir

Etymology 2

From Latin cor.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈkɔɾ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈkɔʁ/, [ˈkɔχ]
  • Hyphenation: cor
  • Rhymes: -ɔɾ

Noun

cor m (plural cores)

  1. heart
Related terms
  • de cor
  • coração

See also

References

  • “cor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.
  • “cor” in Dicionário infopédia da Língua Portuguesa. [em linha]. Porto: Porto Editora, 2003-2020.

Romanian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Greek χορός (chorós, dance), or borrowed from Latin chorus, Italian coro, German Chor.

Noun

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. choir, chorus (group of singers)
Related terms
  • coral
  • corist

Etymology 2

From Latin chorus, from Ancient Greek χορός (khorós).

Noun

cor n (plural coruri)

  1. a gathering, circle, society
  2. a bunch of hay arranged in squares or circles for making haybales
Declension
See also
  • horă

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin cor.

Noun

cor m (plural cors)

  1. (anatomy) heart

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish cor (act of putting, placing; setting up, etc.; act of throwing, casting; act of letting go, discarding; leap, twist; throw (in wrestling); twist, coil; twist, detour, circuit in road, etc.; tune, melody; contract; surety, guarantor; act of overthrowing, defeating; defeat, reverse; state, condition, plight; act of tiring; tiredness, fatigue), verbal noun of fo·ceird (sets, puts, places; throws, casts; casts down, overthrows; puts forth, emits, sends out; launches; utters, makes; raises (a shout, cry); performs, executes, wages).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰɔɾ/

Noun

cor m (genitive singular coir or cuir)

  1. condition, state
    (literally: "what's your condition?")
  2. condition, eventuality, circumstance
    (cf also derived terms)
  3. method, manner
  4. custom
  5. surety
  6. term or condition of a treaty
  7. progress

Mutation

Derived terms

  • air chor 's gu (so that/with the result that)
  • air a h-uile cor (by all means; at all costs)
  • cor-inntinn (state of mind)

References

  • “cor” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 cor”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Venetian

Etymology

From Latin cor. Compare Italian cuore.

Noun

cor m (plural cori)

  1. heart

Related terms

  • corexin

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *korr, from Proto-Celtic *korros (stunted, dwarfish) (compare Old Cornish cor, Middle Breton corr).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔr/

Noun

cor m (plural corrod)

  1. dwarf, pygmy, little urchin
  2. spider; shrew

Synonyms

  • (dwarf): corrach
  • (spider): cop, copyn, corryn

Derived terms

  • corgi
  • corhwyad

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cor”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Zazaki

Etymology

Related to Northern Kurdish jor.

Noun

cor ?

  1. top (uppermost part)

Source: wiktionary.org
  • a Hebrew measure.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)