Like in Scrabble Dictionary

What does like mean? Is like a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is like worth? like how many points in Words With Friends? What does like mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for like

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Is like a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word like is a Scrabble US word. The word like is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

L1I1K5E1

Is like a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word like is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

L1I1K5E1

Is like a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word like is a Words With Friends word. The word like is worth 9 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

L2I1K5E1

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Valid words made from Like

You can make 10 words from 'like' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'like'

LIKE 8 

3 letters words from 'like'

EIK 7ELK 7
ILK 7LEI 3
LEK 7LIE 3

2 letters words from 'like'

EL 2KI 6
LI 2 

All 4 letters words made out of like

like ilke lkie klie ikle kile liek ilek leik elik ielk eilk lkei klei leki elki keli ekli ikel kiel iekl eikl keil ekil

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word like. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in like.

Definitions and meaning of like

like

Alternative forms

  • lak

Pronunciation

  • enPR: līk, IPA(key): /laɪk/
  • Rhymes: -aɪk

Etymology 1

Verb from Middle English liken, from Old English līcian (to please; be sufficient), from Proto-Germanic *līkāną (to please), from Proto-Indo-European *līg-, *leyg- (image; likeness; similarity). Cognate with Saterland Frisian liekje (to be similar, resemble), Dutch lijken (to seem), German Low German lieken (to be like; resemble), German gleichen (to resemble), Swedish lika (to like; put up with; align with), Norwegian like (to like), Icelandic líka (to like).

Noun from Middle English like (pleasure, will, like), from the verb Middle English liken (to like).

Verb

like (third-person singular simple present likes, present participle liking, simple past and past participle liked)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To please.
  2. To enjoy, be pleased by; favor; be in favor of.
    Antonyms: dislike, hate, mislike
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He may either go or stay, as he best likes.
  3. (obsolete) To derive pleasure of, by or with someone or something.
  4. To prefer and maintain (an action) as a regular habit or activity.
  5. (obsolete) To have an appearance or expression; to look; to seem to be (in a specified condition).
  6. (archaic) To come near; to avoid with difficulty; to escape narrowly.
  7. To find attractive; to prefer the company of; to have mild romantic feelings for.
    Synonyms: fancy (British), enjoy, love
    Antonyms: dislike, hate, mislike
  8. (obsolete) To liken; to compare.
  9. (Internet, transitive) To show support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet by marking it with a vote.
    Antonym: unlike
  10. (with 'would' and in certain other phrases) To want, desire. See also would like.
Usage notes
  • In its senses of “enjoy” and “maintain as a regular habit”, like is a catenative verb; in the former, it usually takes a gerund (-ing form), while in the latter, it takes a to-infinitive. See also Appendix:English catenative verbs.
  • Like is only used to mean “want” in certain expressions, such as “if you like” and “I would like”. The conditional form, would like, is used quite freely as a polite synonym for want.
Conjugation
Derived terms
Related terms
  • like like
  • would like
Translations

Noun

like (plural likes)

  1. (usually in the plural) Something that a person likes (prefers).
    Synonyms: favorite, preference
    Antonyms: dislike, pet hate, pet peeve
  2. (Internet) An individual vote showing support for, or approval of, something posted on the Internet.
Translations

References

  • like on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Adjective from Middle English like, lyke, from Old English ġelīċ by shortening, influenced by Old Norse líkr, glíkr; both from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz (like, similar, same). Related to alike; more distantly, with lich and -ly. Cognate with West Frisian like (like; as), Saterland Frisian gliek (like), Danish lig (alike), Dutch gelijk (like, alike), German gleich (equal, like), Icelandic líkur (alike, like, similar), Norwegian lik (like, alike) Swedish lik (like, similar)

Adverb from Middle English like, lyke, liche, lyche, from Old English ġelīċe (likewise, also, as, in like manner, similarly) and Old Norse líka (also, likewise); both from Proto-Germanic *galīka, from Proto-Germanic *galīkaz (same, like, similar).

Conjunction from Middle English like, lyke, lik, lyk, from the adverb Middle English like.

Preposition from Middle English like, lyke, liche, lyche, lijc, liih (similar to, like, equal to, comparable with), from Middle English like (adjective) and like (adverb).

Adjective

like (comparative more like, superlative most like)

  1. Similar.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 2, ch. 3, Landlord Edmund
      [] and this is not a sky, it is a Soul and living Face! Nothing liker the Temple of the Highest, bright with some real effulgence of the Highest, is seen in this world.
  2. (obsolete) Likely; probable.
    • (Can we date this quote by South and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      But it is like the jolly world about us will scoff at the paradox of these practices.
    • (Can we date this quote by Clarendon and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Many were not easy to be governed, nor like to conform themselves to strict rules.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • as like as not
Translations

Adverb

like (comparative more like, superlative most like)

  1. (obsolete, colloquial) Likely.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 2 Scene 3
      DON PEDRO. May be she doth but counterfeit.
      CLAUDIO. Faith, like enough. [= Indeed, quite likely.]
  2. (archaic or rare) In a like or similar manner.
    • Bible, Psalms ciii. 13
      Like as a father pitieth his children, so the Lord pitieth them that fear him.
Synonyms
  • for example
  • such as
  • (archaic) as
Translations

Noun

like (plural likes)

  1. (sometimes as the likes of) Someone similar to a given person, or something similar to a given object; a comparative; a type; a sort.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Winston Churchill on T.E. Lawrence
      We shall never see his like again.
  2. (golf) The stroke that equalizes the number of strokes played by the opposing player or side.
Synonyms
  • ilk
Antonyms
  • antithesis, opposite
Derived terms
  • like-for-like
Translations

Conjunction

like

  1. (colloquial) As, the way.
    • 1966, Advertising slogan for Winston cigarettes
      Winston tastes good like a cigarette should
    • 1978, "Do Unto Others" by Bob Dylan
      But if you do right to me, baby
      I’ll do right to you, too
      Ya got to do unto others
      Like you’d have them, like you’d have them, do unto you
  2. As if; as though.
Usage notes
  • The American Heritage Dictionary opines that using like as a conjunction, instead of as, the way, as if, or as though, is informal; it has, however, been routine since the Middle English period.
Derived terms
  • feel like, look like, seem like, sound like

Preposition

like

  1. Similar to, reminiscent of.
  2. Typical of
    It would be just like Achilles to be sulking in his tent.
  3. Approximating
    Popcorn costs something like $10 dollars at the movies.
  4. In the manner of, similarly to.
    He doesn't act like a president.
  5. Such as
    It's for websites like Wikipedia.
  6. As if there would be.
    It looks like a hot summer in Europe.
Antonyms
  • unlike
Derived terms
  • like a bull at a gate
Translations

Particle

like

  1. (colloquial, Scotland, Tyneside, Teesside, Liverpudlian) A delayed filler.
  2. (colloquial) A mild intensifier.
    • 1972, Charles M. Schulz, Peanuts, December 1:
      [Sally Brown:] Christmas is getting all you can get while the getting is good.
      [Charlie Brown:] GIVING! The only real joy is GIVING!
      [Sally Brown, rolling her eyes:] Like, wow!
  3. (colloquial) indicating approximation or uncertainty
  4. (colloquial, slang) When preceded by any form of the verb to be, used to mean “to say” or “to think”; used to precede an approximate quotation or paraphrase.
    • 2006, Lily Allen, Knock 'Em Out
      You're just doing your own thing and some one comes out the blue,
      They're like, "Alright"
      What ya saying, "Yeah can I take your digits?"
      And you're like, "no not in a million years, you're nasty please leave me alone."
Synonyms
  • (delayed filler): I mean, you know
  • (mild intensifier): I mean, well, you know
  • (indicating approximation or uncertainty): I mean, well, you know
  • (colloquial: used to precede paraphrased quotations): be all, go
Usage notes

The use as a quotative is informal. It is commonly used by young people, and commonly disliked by older generations, especially in repeated use. It may be combined with the use of the present tense as a narrative. Similar terms are to go and all, as in I go, “Why did you do that?” and he goes, “I don't know” and I was all, “Why did you do that?” and he was all, “I don't know.” These expressions can imply that the attributed remark which follows is representative rather than necessarily an exact quotation; however, in speech these structures do tend to require mimicking the original speaker's inflection in a way said would not.

Excessive use of "like" as a meaningless filler is widely criticised.

Translations

Interjection

like

  1. (Liverpudlian, Tyneside) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.

Etymology 3

From like (adverb) and like (adjective).

Verb

like (third-person singular simple present likes, present participle liking, simple past and past participle liked)

  1. (chiefly dialectal, intransitive) To be likely.
References
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN
  • like at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Kiel, Kile, kile, liek

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English like.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [lɑjɡ̊]

Noun

like n (singular definite liket, plural indefinite likes)

  1. (Internet) like

Verb

like (imperative like, infinitive at like, present tense liker, past tense likede, perfect tense har liket)

  1. (Internet) like

French

Pronunciation

  • Homophones: likent, likes

Verb

like

  1. first-person singular present indicative of liker
  2. third-person singular present indicative of liker
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of liker
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of liker
  5. second-person singular imperative of liker

German

Verb

like

  1. First-person singular present of liken.
  2. First-person singular subjunctive I of liken.
  3. Third-person singular subjunctive I of liken.
  4. Imperative singular of liken.

Hawaiian

Etymology

From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *lite. Compare Maori rite.

Verb

like

  1. (stative) like, alike, similar

Derived terms

  • hoʻolike: to make things equal, to make things similar (less common)
  • hoʻohālike: to make things equal, to make things similar (more common)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse líka

Verb

like (imperative lik, present tense liker, simple past likte, past participle likt)

  1. to like

Etymology 2

Adjective

like

  1. definite singular of lik
  2. plural of lik

Etymology 3

Adverb

like

  1. as, equally
Derived terms
  • likefullt, like fullt
  • likeledes
  • likeså

References

  • “like” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːkə/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse líka

Alternative forms

  • lika

Verb

like (imperative lik or like, present tense likar or liker, simple past lika or likte, past participle lika or likt)

  1. to like

Etymology 2

Adjective

like

  1. definite singular of lik
  2. plural of lik

Etymology 3

From Old Norse líka

Adverb

like

  1. as, equally
  2. just, immediately

References

  • “like” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Scots

Verb

like (third-person singular present likes, present participle likin, past likit, past participle likit)

  1. To like.
  2. To be hesitant to do something.
  3. To love somebody or something.

Adverb

like (not comparable)

  1. like

Interjection

like

  1. (South Scots) Used to place emphasis upon a statement.

Spanish

Noun

like m (plural likes)

  1. (Internet slang) like

Swedish

Adjective

like

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of lik.

Noun

like c

  1. match (someone similarly skillful)

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • to be fond of.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)