Mos in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does mos mean? Is mos a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is mos worth? mos how many points in Words With Friends? What does mos mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for mos

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Is mos a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word mos is a Scrabble US word. The word mos is worth 5 points in Scrabble:

M3O1S1

Is mos a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word mos is a Scrabble UK word and has 5 points:

M3O1S1

Is mos a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word mos is a Words With Friends word. The word mos is worth 6 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

M4O1S1

Our tools

Valid words made from Mos

You can make 7 words from 'mos' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'mos'

MOS 5OMS 5
SOM 5 

2 letters words from 'mos'

MO 4OM 4
OS 2SO 2

All 3 letters words made out of mos

mos oms mso smo osm som

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word mos. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in mos.

Definitions and meaning of mos

mos

Noun

mos (plural mores)

  1. (rare) singular of mores (moral norms or customs)

Anagrams

  • OMS, OMs, SMO, Som., oms, osm, som, som'

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔs/

Etymology 1

From Dutch mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą

Noun

mos (plural mosse)

  1. moss

Etymology 2

From Dutch most, from Latin mustum

Noun

mos (uncountable)

  1. must (unfermented or partially fermented grape juice)

Albanian

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *mē tše, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁ kʷíd.

Adverb

mos

  1. don't

Related terms

  • mo

Aragonese

Pronoun

mos

  1. us (first-person plural direct pronoun)
  2. (to) us (first-person plural indirect pronoun)

Synonyms

  • nos

Asturian

Pronoun

mos

  1. Alternative form of nos

Bouyei

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *ʰmɤːlᴮ (new). Cognate with Thai ใหม่ (mài), Northern Thai ᩉ᩠ᨾᩲ᩵, Lao ໃໝ່ (mai), ᦺᦖᧈ (ṁay1), Tai Dam ꪻꪢ꪿, Shan မႂ်ႇ (màue), Tai Nüa ᥛᥬᥱ (mǎue), Ahom 𑜉𑜧 (maw) or 𑜉𑜨𑜧 (mow), Zhuang moq.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mo˧˥/

Adjective

mos

  1. new

Catalan

Etymology 1

From Latin morsus (little bits).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmɔs/

Noun

mos m (plural mossos)

  1. bite, mouthful
    Synonyms: mossegada, mossada
  2. bit (metal placed in a horse's mouth)
    Synonym: fre

Etymology 2

Pronoun

mos (enclitic, contracted 'ns, proclitic ens)

  1. us (Dialectal, plural, direct or indirect object). Standard Catalan ens/'ns/-nos.

Etymology 3

From Vulgar Latin *mōs, reduced form of Latin meōs

Determiner

mos

  1. masculine plural of mon

Alternative forms

  • mons (dialectal)

Further reading

  • “mos” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse *mós, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (mush, porridge).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːs/, [moːˀs]

Noun

mos c (singular definite mosen, not used in plural form)

  1. mash, puree

Etymology 2

From Old Norse mosi, mose, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔs/, [mɔs]

Noun

mos n (singular definite mosset, plural indefinite mosser)

  1. moss
Inflection

Etymology 3

See mose (to mash, to slog).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːs/, [moːˀs]

Verb

mos

  1. imperative of mose

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch mos, from Old Dutch *mos, from Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɔs/
  • Hyphenation: mos
  • Rhymes: -ɔs

Noun

mos n (plural mossen, diminutive mosje n)

  1. moss (small seedless plant(s) growing on surfaces)
  2. lichen (symbiotic association(s) of algae and fungi)
  3. (obsolete, rare) swamp, marsh

Derived terms

  • bladmos
  • korstmos
  • rendiermos

Anagrams

  • som

Hungarian

Etymology

From Proto-Uralic *muśke- or *mośke- (to wash).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ ˈmoʃ]
  • Rhymes: -oʃ

Verb

mos

  1. (transitive) to wash something
    Perfectives: megmos, kimos, lemos
  2. (transitive) to brush (teeth)

Conjugation

Derived terms

References


Kalasha

Etymology

From Proto-Dardic [Term?], from Sanskrit मांस (māṃsa), from Proto-Indo-Aryan *māmsás, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *māmsás, from Proto-Indo-European *mēmso-.

Noun

mos

  1. meat

Latin

Etymology

Root noun interpreted as s-stem noun of uncertain origin. Generally believed to derive from Proto-Indo-European *mō-, *mē- (to intend/to be intent upon, to be of strong will), whence Ancient Greek μαίομαι (maíomai, to strive) and perhaps Ancient Greek Μοῦσᾰ (Moûsa, Muse), and also English mood. It has been conjectured that some senses of mōs, such as those having to do with "manner" and "way", may indicate a possible derivation from Proto-Indo-European *med- (to measure), compare and contrast modus; if that is true, it would seem to suggest an example of combined etymology or etymologic conflation.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /moːs/
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /mos/, [mɔs]

Noun

mōs m (genitive mōris); third declension

  1. manner (of behaving), way (of behaving); behavior, conduct
    Synonym: modus
  2. custom, habit, practice, usage, wont
    Synonym: habitus
  3. (predominantly plural) character; disposition, inclination, temperament
    Synonyms: animus, dispositiō, inclīnātiō, temperamentum
  4. will, self-will, humor, caprice
    Synonyms: arbitrium, voluntas
  5. (transf.) quality, nature, mode, fashion
  6. (transf.) precept, law, rule
  7. (plural only) morals, principles

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Dutch: mores
  • English: meo more, mores
  • French: mœurs
  • Romanian: moare

References

  • mos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • mos in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mos in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag

Further reading

  • mos maiorum on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Old English

Etymology 1

From Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old High German mos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mos/

Noun

mos n

  1. moss

Descendants

  • Middle English: mos, mosse
    • Scots: mos
    • English: moss

Etymology 2

From Proto-West Germanic *mōs, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (food).

Akin to Old Saxon mōs (food), Old High German muos (German Mus, Gemüse (food, vegetables), Old English mete (food). More at meat.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːs/

Noun

mōs n

  1. food, nourishment, victuals
Declension
Related terms
  • mēsan

Descendants

  • Middle English: mos, mose
    • (perhaps) English: mush
    • (perhaps) Scots: moosh

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *mos, from Proto-Germanic *musą, whence also Old English mos.

Noun

mos n

  1. moss

Descendants

  • German: Moos

Old Occitan

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mos/

Adjective

mos

  1. my
    • c. 1160, Bernart de Ventadorn, canso:
      Que mos chantars no·m val gaire / Ni mas voutas ni mei so [...].
      For my song little avails me, nor my verses, nor my airs.

See also


Penobscot

Etymology

From Proto-Algonquian *mo·swa (it strips), referring to how a moose strips tree bark when feeding: compare Massachusett moos-u (he strips, cuts smooth).

Noun

mos

  1. moose

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse *mós, from Proto-Germanic *mōsą (mush, porridge).

Noun

mos n

  1. mash, sauce, jam, something mashed
  2. indefinite genitive singular of mo

Declension

Related terms

Anagrams

  • som

Source: wiktionary.org
  • MO, a moment.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)