Sal in Scrabble Dictionary

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What does sal mean? Is sal a Scrabble word?

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Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sal

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Is sal a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sal is a Scrabble US word. The word sal is worth 3 points in Scrabble:

S1A1L1

Is sal a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sal is a Scrabble UK word and has 3 points:

S1A1L1

Is sal a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sal is a Words With Friends word. The word sal is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1A1L2

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Valid words made from Sal

You can make 6 words from 'sal' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


3 letters words from 'sal'

ALS 3LAS 3
SAL 3 

2 letters words from 'sal'

AL 2AS 2
LA 2 

All 3 letters words made out of sal

sal asl sla lsa als las

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sal. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sal.

Definitions and meaning of sal

sal

Etymology 1

From Old English sealt; see salt. Compare Latin sal.

Noun

sal (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry, obsolete) salt
Usage notes

Was used predominantly to form the names of various chemical compounds.

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Hindi साल (sāl), from Sanskrit शाल (śāla).

Alternative forms

  • saul, shala

Noun

sal (plural sals)

  1. Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree.
Translations

Anagrams

  • ALS, ALs, ASL, LAs, LSA, SLA, a/s/l, al's, als, asl, las

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch zal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal/

Verb

sal (present sal, past sou)

  1. shall, will

Aragonese

Etymology

From Latin sal

Noun

sal f

  1. salt

References

  • Bal Palazios, Santiago (2002) , “sal”, in Dizionario breu de a luenga aragonesa, Zaragoza, →ISBN

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun

sal m (plural sales)

  1. salt

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan sal, from Latin sāl, salem, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈsal/

Noun

sal f (plural sals)

  1. salt

Related terms

  • salar

Further reading

  • “sal” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “sal” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “sal” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “sal” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Chairel

Noun

sal

  1. sun

References

  • W. McCulloch, Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill tribes with a comparative vocabulary of the Munnipore and other languages (1859, Calcutta: Bengal Printing Company)

Chavacano

Etymology

From Spanish sal (salt).

Noun

sal

  1. salt

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, cognate with German Saal, Dutch zaal. The Germanic word was borrowed to French salon.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsæˀl]

Noun

sal c (singular definite salen, plural indefinite sale)

  1. hall, room
  2. floor (storey of a building)
    Synonym: etage

Declension

Derived terms

  • retssal

Further reading

  • “sal” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “sal” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

Esperanto

Interjection

sal

  1. (text messaging) Abbreviation of saluton (hello).

Franco-Provençal

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem.

Pronunciation

Noun

sal f

  1. salt

Galician

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [s̺al]

Noun

sal m

  1. salt

Derived terms

  • saleiro

Related terms

  • As Saíñas

References

  • “sal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “sal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “sal” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “sal” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Guinea-Bissau Creole

Etymology

From Portuguese sal. Cognate with Kabuverdianu sal.

Noun

sal

  1. salt

Icelandic

Noun

sal

  1. indefinite accusative singular of salur
  2. indefinite dative singular of salur

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch zaal.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal/

Noun

sal (plural, first-person possessive salku, second-person possessive salmu, third-person possessive salnya)

  1. A large room.
    Synonym: bangsal

Further reading

  • “sal” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Interlingua

Noun

sal (plural sales)

  1. salt (substance consisting of positive and negative ions)

Related terms

  • salin

Irish

Noun

sal f (genitive singular saile) or
sal m (genitive singular sail)

  1. Alternative form of sail (dirt; stain)

Declension

As masculine first-declension noun:

As feminine second-declension noun:

Mutation


Istriot

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun

sal

  1. salt

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese sal.

Noun

sal

  1. salt

Proper noun

sal

  1. (Sal) Sal
  2. One of the ten islands of Cape Verde

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Cognates include Sanskrit सर (sará), Old Armenian աղ (), Ancient Greek ἅλς (háls), Tocharian A sāle, and Old English sealt (English salt).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /saːl/, [saːɫ̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /sal/

Noun

sāl m (genitive salis); third declension

  1. salt
  2. (figurative) wit

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Usage notes

  • Sāl is occasionally found as a neuter noun in the singular. A neuter by-form sale (genitive salis) is also occasionally found, e.g. in Ennius Ann. 385 and Varro d. Non. 223, 17.

Derived terms

  • salō
  • saliō
  • sāl petrae (stone salt; that is, found as an incrustation)

Descendants


Middle Dutch

Verb

sal

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of sullen

Northern Kurdish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑːl/

Noun

sal f

  1. year

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse salr.

Noun

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall.
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse sǫðull.

Alternative forms

  • sadel

Noun

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. saddle

References

  • “sal” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑːl/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz.

Noun

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse sǫðull, from Proto-Germanic *sadulaz.

Noun

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. a saddle
Related terms
  • sala, sale

Etymology 3

From Old Norse sal (payment).

Noun

sal n (definite singular salet, indefinite plural sal, definite plural sala)

  1. a sale
Related terms
  • selja, selje
  • marknad

References

  • “sal” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • als-, las, sla

Novial

Verb

sal (past saled, active participle salent)

  1. (auxiliary) shall, will, goes in front of a verb in order to mark it as having the future tense

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *sail, from Proto-Germanic *sailą (rope).

Cognate with Old Saxon sēl (Dutch zeel), Old High German seil (German Seil).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɑːl/

Noun

sāl m

  1. rope, cord, rein

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Middle English: sal, sole, soole
    • Scots: sale, saill, saile, seill, seale
    • English: sole

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *salā.

Noun

sal f (genitive saile)

  1. dirt
  2. filth, stain
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 92d12

Inflection

Related terms

  • salach

Descendants

  • Irish: sail
  • Scottish Gaelic: sal

Mutation

References

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “sal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old Spanish

Etymology

From Latin salem, accusative of sāl.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsal]

Noun

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt
    • c. 1250, Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 61r.
      Et ſu ṕpriedat es de aborrecer la ſal tanto que bié parece que a entramas grand enemiztat. ca ſi las ponen en uno. quiebra la piedra ¬ mueles; ¬ la ſal pierde la ſalgadumbre que a en ella.
      And its property is that it loathes salt so much that it would seem that there is a great enmity between them both, for if they are placed together, the stone breaks, and the salt loses all the saltiness within.

Related terms

  • salado
  • salgadumbre
  • salgadura

Descendants

  • Spanish: sal

Piedmontese

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal/

Noun

sal m or f

  1. salt

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈsaɫ/
    • Rhymes: -aɫ
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈsaw/
    • Rhymes: -aw
  • Hyphenation: sal

Etymology 1

From Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem (salt, wit), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l- (salt).

Noun

sal m (plural sais)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, a substance used as a condiment and preservative)
    Synonyms: cloreto de sódio, sal de cozinha
  2. (chemistry) salt (any compound formed from the reaction of an acid with a base)
  3. (usually in the plural) bath salt (any of several inorganic salts sometimes added to bath water)
    Synonym: sal de banho
  4. (figurative) wit; the quality of being engaging
    Synonym: graça
Derived terms
  • salzinho (diminutive)
Related terms

Etymology 2

Noun

sal m (plural sais)

  1. (rare) sal (Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree)

Romanian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish [Term?] (Turkish şal, from Persian شال(šāl).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal/

Noun

sal n (plural saluri)

  1. (rare) shawl, scarf
    Synonym: șal

Etymology 2

Shortened form of salut.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sa(ː)l/

Interjection

sal!

  1. (informal) hey!
  2. (informal) bye!
Synonyms
  • salut (1, 2)
  • pa (2)

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Puter) sel

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem., from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun

sal m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) salt

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sal/
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Hyphenation: sal

Etymology 1

From Old Spanish sal, from Latin sāl, salem (compare Catalan sal, French sel, Italian sale, Portuguese sal, Romanian sare), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-, a root shared by English salt.

Noun

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt; table salt
    Synonyms: sal común, sal de mesa
  2. (chemistry) salt
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

Verb

sal

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of salir.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sol-, *sel-.

Pronunciation

Noun

sal c

  1. a large room (for dining or meetings)

Declension

Related terms

  • hörsal
  • läsesal
  • matsal

Further reading

  • sal in Svenska Akademiens ordlista över svenska språket (13th ed., online)

Anagrams

  • als

Tocharian B

Adjective

sal

  1. dirty

Turkish

Etymology 1

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

sal (definite accusative salı, plural sallar)

  1. raft

Etymology 2

From Ottoman Turkish سل(sal, sel), from Arabic سَلَّ(salla, to draw, to unsheathe).

Verb

sal

  1. second-person singular imperative of salmak

References

  • Meninski, Franciszek à Mesgnien (1680) , “sal”, in Thesaurus linguarum orientalium, Turcicae, Arabicae, Persicae, praecipuas earum opes à Turcis peculiariter usurpatas continens, nimirum Lexicon Turkico-Arabico-Persicum, Vienna, column 2647

Venetian

Alternative forms

  • sale

Etymology

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun

sal m (plural sałi)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, non-chemical usage)

sal m (plural sali)

  1. (chemistry) salt

Volapük

Noun

sal (nominative plural sals)

  1. salt

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • SAKSAUL, a low, thick, grotesquely contorted tree of the saltbush family found on the steppes of Asia.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)