Talk in Scrabble Dictionary

What does talk mean? Is talk a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is talk worth? talk how many points in Words With Friends? What does talk mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for talk

See how to calculate how many points for talk.

Is talk a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word talk is a Scrabble US word. The word talk is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

T1A1L1K5

Is talk a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word talk is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

T1A1L1K5

Is talk a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word talk is a Words With Friends word. The word talk is worth 9 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

T1A1L2K5

Our tools

Valid words made from Talk

You can make 10 words from 'talk' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'talk'

TALK 8 

3 letters words from 'talk'

ALT 3KAT 7
LAT 3TAK 7

2 letters words from 'talk'

AL 2AT 2
KA 6LA 2
TA 2 

All 4 letters words made out of talk

talk atlk tlak ltak altk latk takl atkl tkal ktal aktl katl tlka ltka tkla ktla lkta klta alkt lakt aklt kalt lkat klat

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word talk. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in talk.

Definitions and meaning of talk

talk

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɔːk/, /toːk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /tɔk/
    • (w:cot–caught merger, w:northern cities vowel shift) IPA(key): /tɑk/, /täːk/
  • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /toːk/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːk
  • Homophones: torc, torq, torque (non-rhotic accents only), tock (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English talken, talkien, from Old English *tealcian (to talk, chat), from Proto-Germanic *talkōną (to talk, chatter), frequentative form of Proto-Germanic *talōną (to count, recount, tell), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (to aim, calculate, adjust, count), equivalent to tell +‎ -k. Cognate with Scots talk (to talk), Low German taalken (to talk). Related also to Danish tale (to talk, speak), Swedish tala (to talk, speak, say, chatter), Icelandic tala (to talk), Old English talian (to count, calculate, reckon, account, consider, think, esteem, value; argue; tell, relate; impute, assign). More at tale.

Alternative forms

  • taulke (obsolete)

Verb

talk (third-person singular simple present talks, present participle talking, simple past and past participle talked)

  1. (intransitive) To communicate, usually by means of speech.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Let’s go to my office and talk. ― I like to talk with you, Ms. Weaver.
  2. (transitive, informal) To discuss; to talk about.
  3. (transitive) To speak (a certain language).
  4. (transitive, informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) Used to emphasise the importance, size, complexity etc. of the thing mentioned.
  5. (intransitive, slang) To confess, especially implicating others.
  6. (intransitive) To criticize someone for something of which one is guilty oneself.
  7. (intransitive) To gossip; to create scandal.
  8. (informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) To influence someone to express something, especially a particular stance or viewpoint or in a particular manner.
Conjugation

See also: talkest, talketh

Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:talk
Coordinate terms
  • listen
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English talk, talke (conversation; discourse), from the verb (see above).

Noun

talk (countable and uncountable, plural talks)

  1. A conversation or discussion; usually serious, but informal.
  2. A lecture.
  3. (uncountable) Gossip; rumour.
  4. (preceded by the; often qualified by a following of) A major topic of social discussion.
  5. (preceded by the) A customary conversation by parent(s) or guardian(s) with their (often teenaged) child about a reality of life; in particular:
    1. A customary conversation in which parent(s) explain sexual intercourse to their child.
      Have you had the talk with Jay yet?
    2. (US) A customary conversation in which the parent(s) of a black child explain the racism and violence they may face, especially when interacting with police, and strategies to manage it.
      • 2012, Crystal McCrary, Inspiration: Profiles of Black Women Changing Our World →ISBN:
        Later, I made sure to have the talk with my son about being a black boy, []
      • 2016, Jim Wallis, America's Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge →ISBN:
        The Talk
        All the black parents I have ever spoken to have had “the talk” with their sons and daughters. “The talk” is a conversation about how to behave and not to behave with police.
      • 2016, Stuart Scott, Larry Platt, Every Day I Fight →ISBN, page 36:
        Now, I was a black man in the South, and my folks had had “the talk” with me. No, not the one about the birds and bees. This one is about the black man and the police.
  6. (uncountable, not preceded by an article) Empty boasting, promises or claims.
  7. Meeting to discuss a particular matter.
    The leaders of the G8 nations are currently in talks over nuclear weapons.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:talk
  • (meeting): conference, debate, discussion, meeting
Derived terms
Translations

Related terms

Pages starting with “talk”.


Danish

Etymology

Via French talc or German Talk, from Persian طلق‎ (talq).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talk/, [tˢalˀɡ̊]

Noun

talk c (singular definite talken, not used in plural form)

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Related terms

  • talkum

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

talk m (uncountable)

  1. talc (soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch talch, from Old Dutch *talg, from Proto-Germanic *talgaz. More at English tallow.

Noun

talk c (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of talg (tallow)

Anagrams

  • kalt

Polish

Noun

talk m inan

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension


Swedish

Noun

talk c

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension


Source: wiktionary.org
  • of or like a talisman.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)