Ache in Scrabble Dictionary

What does ache mean? Is ache a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is ache worth? ache how many points in Words With Friends? What does ache mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for ache

See how to calculate how many points for ache.

Is ache a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word ache is a Scrabble US word. The word ache is worth 9 points in Scrabble:

A1C3H4E1

Is ache a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word ache is a Scrabble UK word and has 9 points:

A1C3H4E1

Is ache a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word ache is a Words With Friends word. The word ache is worth 9 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

A1C4H3E1

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Valid words made from Ache

You can make 16 words from 'ache' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'ache'

ACHE 9EACH 9

3 letters words from 'ache'

ACE 5ACH 8
CHA 8CHE 8
ECH 8HAE 6

2 letters words from 'ache'

AE 2AH 5
CH 7EA 2
EH 5HA 5
HE 5 

All 4 letters words made out of ache

ache cahe ahce hace chae hcae aceh caeh aech each ceah ecah ahec haec aehc eahc heac ehac chea hcea ceha echa heca ehca

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word ache. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in ache.

Definitions and meaning of ache

ache

Alternative forms

  • ake (rare)

Etymology 1

From Middle English aken (verb), and ache (noun), from Old English acan (verb) (from Proto-Germanic *akaną (to be bad, be evil)) and æċe (noun) (from Proto-Germanic *akiz), both from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eg- (sin, crime). Cognate with Low German aken, achen, äken (to hurt, to ache), North Frisian akelig, æklig (terrible, miserable, sharp, intense), West Frisian aaklik (nasty, horrible, dismal, dreary), Dutch akelig (nasty, horrible).

The verb was originally strong, conjugating for tense like take (e.g. I ake, I oke, I have aken), but gradually became weak during Middle English; the noun was originally pronounced as /eɪt͡ʃ/ as spelled (compare breach, from break). Historically the verb was spelled ake, and the noun ache (even after the form /eɪk/ started to become common for the noun; compare again break which is now also a noun). The verb came to be spelled like the noun when lexicographer Samuel Johnson mistakenly assumed that it derived from Ancient Greek ἄχος (ákhos, pain) due to the similarity in form and meaning of the two words.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: āk, IPA(key): /eɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Verb

ache (third-person singular simple present aches, present participle aching, simple past ached or (obsolete) oke, past participle ached or (obsolete) aken)

  1. (intransitive) To suffer pain; to be the source of, or be in, pain, especially continued dull pain; to be distressed.
    • c. 1593, Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene V:
      Fie, how my bones ache!
  2. (transitive, literary, rare) To cause someone or something to suffer pain.
Derived terms
  • ache for
Translations

Noun

ache (plural aches)

  1. Continued dull pain, as distinguished from sudden twinges, or spasmodic pain.
    • c. 1610, Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I, Scene II:
      Fill all thy bones with aches.
Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • hurt

References

  • Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition.

Etymology 2

From Middle English ache, from Old French ache, from Latin apium (celery). Reinforced by modern French ache.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: āch, IPA(key): /eɪt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪtʃ

Noun

ache (plural aches)

  1. (obsolete) parsley
Derived terms
  • lovage (by folk etymology)
  • smallage

Etymology 3

Representing the pronunciation of the letter H.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: āch, IPA(key): /eɪt͡ʃ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪtʃ

Noun

ache (plural aches)

  1. Rare spelling of aitch.

Anagrams

  • Aceh, Chae, Chea, HACE, each, hace

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʃ/
  • Rhymes: -aʃ
  • Homophones: hache, haches

Etymology 1

From Latin apia, plural of apium (celery).

Noun

ache f (plural aches)

  1. celery (plant)

Etymology 2

From Middle French ache, from Old French ache, from Vulgar Latin *acca, probably an extension of earlier ha, from an unindentified source. Compare Italian acca.

Noun

ache m (plural aches)

  1. aitch, The name of the Latin-script letter H.

Descendants

  • Persian: هاش
  • Romanian: haș
  • Russian: аш ()
  • → Vietnamese: hát

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English eċe, ace, æċe, from Proto-Germanic *akiz. Some forms are remodelled on aken.

Alternative forms

  • ake, eche

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈaːk(ə)/, /ˈaːtʃ(ə)/, /ˈatʃ(ə)/, /ˈɛːtʃ(ə)/, /ˈɛtʃ(ə)/

Noun

ache (plural aches)

  1. Aching; long-lasting hurting or injury.
Related terms
  • aken
Descendants
  • English: ache
  • Scots: ake
References
  • “āche (n.(1))” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-12.

Etymology 2

From Old French ache, from Latin apium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈatʃ(ə)/, /ˈaːtʃ(ə)/

Noun

ache (plural aches)

  1. A plant of the genus Apium, especially celery.
Descendants
  • English: ache
References
  • “āche (n.(2))” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-06-12.

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

ache f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) wild celery
    Synonym: céléri sauvage

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: a‧che

Verb

ache

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of achar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of achar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of achar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of achar

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to endure a dull lasting pain.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)