Barn in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does barn mean? Is barn a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is barn worth? barn how many points in Words With Friends? What does barn mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for barn

See how to calculate how many points for barn.

Is barn a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word barn is a Scrabble US word. The word barn is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

B3A1R1N1

Is barn a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word barn is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

B3A1R1N1

Is barn a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word barn is a Words With Friends word. The word barn is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

B4A1R1N2

Our tools

Valid words made from Barn

You can make 13 words from 'barn' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'barn'

BARN 6BRAN 6

3 letters words from 'barn'

ARB 5BAN 5
BAR 5BRA 5
NAB 5RAN 3

2 letters words from 'barn'

AB 4AN 2
AR 2BA 4
NA 2 

All 4 letters words made out of barn

barn abrn bran rban arbn rabn banr abnr bnar nbar anbr nabr brna rbna bnra nbra rnba nrba arnb ranb anrb narb rnab nrab

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word barn. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in barn.

Definitions and meaning of barn

barn

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bärn, IPA(key): /bɑɹn/
    • (General Australian, Boston) IPA(key): [baːn]
    • (NYC) IPA(key): [bɒən]
    • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): [bɐːn]
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [bɑːn]
    • (General American) IPA(key): [bɑɹn]
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)n

Etymology 1

From Middle English bern, from Old English bearn, bern, contracted forms of Old English berern, bereærn (barn, granary), compound of bere (barley) and ærn, ræn (dwelling, barn), from Proto-West Germanic *raʀn, from Proto-Germanic *razną (compare Old Norse rann), from pre-Germanic *h₁rh̥₁-s-nó-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₁- (to rest).

More at rest and barley.

For the use as a unit of surface area, see w:Barn (unit) § Etymology.

Noun

barn (plural barns)

  1. (agriculture) A building, often found on a farm, used for storage or keeping animals such as cattle.
  2. (nuclear physics) A unit of surface area equal to 10−28 square metres.
  3. (informal, basketball, ice hockey) An arena.
  4. (slang) A warm and cozy place, especially a bedroom; a roost.
Derived terms
See also
  • Besses o' th' Barn
Translations

Verb

barn (third-person singular simple present barns, present participle barning, simple past and past participle barned)

  1. (transitive) To lay up in a barn.

Etymology 2

From Middle English barn, bern, from Old English bearn (child, son, offspring, progeny) and Old Norse barn (child). Doublet of bairn. Cognate in Frisian: bern (child/children).

Noun

barn (plural barns)

  1. (dialect, parts of Northern England) A child.
Synonyms
  • (child): bairn
Translations

References

  • barn at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • barn in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Bran, NRAB, bran

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *barnati (proclaim). Cognate with Cornish barna.

Verb

barn

  1. (transitive) To judge.

Inflection

Conjugation

Derived terms


Danish

Etymology

From Old Danish, Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną. Compare English bairn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /barn/, /b̥ɑːˀn/, [pɑ̈ˀn]

Noun

barn n (singular definite barnet, plural indefinite børn)

  1. child (immature human)
    Dette er ikke et passende sted for børn.
    This is not a fitting place for children.
  2. child (human offspring)
    Mine børn er alle flyttet hjemmefra.
    My children have all moved out.

Usage notes

In compounds: barn-, barne-, barns- or børne-.

Declension

Derived terms

References

  • “barn” in Den Danske Ordbog

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpatn]
  • Rhymes: -atn

Noun

barn n (genitive singular barns, plural børn)

  1. child

Declension


French

Pronunciation

Noun

barn m (plural barns)

  1. (physics) barn (unit)

Gothic

Romanization

barn

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂𐌽

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpartn̥], IPA(key): [ˈpatn̥] (colloquial), IPA(key): [ˈparn] (Southeast dialect)
  • Rhymes: -artn, -atn

Noun

barn n (genitive singular barns, nominative plural börn)

  1. child

Declension

Derived terms


Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English barn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbarn/
  • Rhymes: -arn
  • Hyphenation: bàrn

Noun

barn m (invariable)

  1. (nuclear physics) barn (a unit of surface area)

References

  • barn in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English bearn, from Proto-West Germanic *barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Alternative forms

  • bern, bearn, bærn, barne, berne, baren

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /barn/, /baːrn/, /bɛrn/

Noun

barn (plural barnes or barnen)

  1. A member of one's immediate offspring or progeny.
  2. A child, youth, or baby.
  3. A person; a member of humanity.
  4. A younger soldier or fighter.
Related terms
  • barneschen
  • barnhede
  • barnles
  • barntem
  • stepbarn
Descendants
  • Scots: bairn
    • English: bairn
  • English: barn (obsolete, dialectal)
    • Northumbrian: bairn
References
  • “bā̆rn, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-25.

Etymology 2

From Old English bereærn.

Noun

barn

  1. Alternative form of bern (barn)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną (child), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear, carry).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑːɳ/

Noun

barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn, definite plural barna or barnene)

  1. child

Derived terms

References

  • “barn” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • badn, bonn, bån

Etymology

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną (child), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *bʰer- (to bear, carry). The plural form born is from the Old Norse u-umlauted form bǫrn. This umlaut can also be seen in Icelandic börn and Danish and Faroese børn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑːrn/ (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn or born, definite plural barna or borna)

  1. child

Inflection

Derived terms

Related terms

  • bera (to bear, carry, verb)

References

  • “barn” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Noun

barn n (genitive barns, plural børn)

  1. child

Descendants

  • Danish: barn

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

Noun

barn n (genitive barns, plural bǫrn)

  1. child

Declension

Descendants

References

  • barn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, whence also Old English bearn, Old High German barn, Swedish barn.

Noun

barn n

  1. child

Declension



Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Noun

barn n

  1. child

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: barn

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /barn/
  • Rhymes: -arn
  • Syllabification: barn

Noun

barn m inan

  1. (nuclear physics) barn (a unit of surface area equal to 10−28 square metre)

Declension

Further reading

  • barn in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish barn (child), from Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-. Cognate with Danish barn, Icelandic barn, Old Saxon barn, Old High German barn, Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (worker) and bernẽlis (lad), a kind of participle to bära (to bear, to carry, as in childbirth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑːrn/, [bɑːɳ]

Noun

barn n

  1. child (a young person)
  2. (someone's) child, offspring (a son or daughter)
  3. descendant (e.g. children of Abraham)
  4. a follower (e.g., God's children)
  5. (someone's) creation, invention
  6. (uncountable) barn (a unit of area in nuclear physics)

Declension

Synonyms

  • unge

Related terms

See also

  • pojke
  • flicka

References

  • barn in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • barn in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Welsh

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *barnati from Proto-Indo-European *gʷerH-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /barn/

Noun

barn f (plural barnau)

  1. opinion, view
  2. judgement, sentence

Derived terms

  • barnu (to adjudge; to pass sentence)

Mutation


Source: wiktionary.org
  • a building for storing hay, straw etc..
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)