Gloom in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does gloom mean? Is gloom a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is gloom worth? gloom how many points in Words With Friends? What does gloom mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for gloom

See how to calculate how many points for gloom.

Is gloom a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word gloom is a Scrabble US word. The word gloom is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

G2L1O1O1M3

Is gloom a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word gloom is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

G2L1O1O1M3

Is gloom a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word gloom is a Words With Friends word. The word gloom is worth 11 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

G3L2O1O1M4

Our tools

Valid words made from Gloom

You can make 19 words from 'gloom' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


5 letters words from 'gloom'

GLOOM 8 

4 letters words from 'gloom'

GLOM 7GOOL 5
LOGO 5LOOM 6
MOOL 6 

3 letters words from 'gloom'

GOO 4LOG 4
LOO 3MOG 6
MOL 5MOO 5
OLM 5OOM 5

2 letters words from 'gloom'

GO 3LO 2
MO 4OM 4
OO 2 

All 5 letters words made out of gloom

gloom lgoom golom oglom logom olgom gloom lgoom golom oglom logom olgom goolm ogolm goolm ogolm ooglm ooglm loogm ologm loogm ologm oolgm oolgm glomo lgomo golmo oglmo logmo olgmo glmoo lgmoo gmloo mgloo lmgoo mlgoo gomlo ogmlo gmolo mgolo omglo moglo lomgo olmgo lmogo mlogo omlgo molgo glomo lgomo golmo oglmo logmo olgmo glmoo lgmoo gmloo mgloo lmgoo mlgoo gomlo ogmlo gmolo mgolo omglo moglo lomgo olmgo lmogo mlogo omlgo molgo gooml ogoml gooml ogoml oogml oogml gomol ogmol gmool mgool omgol mogol gomol ogmol gmool mgool omgol mogol oomgl oomgl omogl moogl omogl moogl loomg olomg loomg olomg oolmg oolmg lomog olmog lmoog mloog omlog molog lomog olmog lmoog mloog omlog molog oomlg oomlg omolg moolg omolg moolg

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word gloom. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in gloom.

Definitions and meaning of gloom

gloom

Etymology

From Middle English *gloom, *glom, from Old English glōm (gloaming, twilight, darkness), from Proto-West Germanic *glōm, from Proto-Germanic *glōmaz (gleam, shimmer, sheen), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰley- (to gleam, shimmer, glow). The English word is cognate with Norwegian glom (transparent membrane), Scots gloam (twilight; faint light; dull gleam).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡluːm/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡlum/
  • Rhymes: -uːm

Noun

gloom (usually uncountable, plural glooms)

  1. Darkness, dimness, or obscurity.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, chapter 4, in Moonfleet:
      Here was a surprise, and a sad one for me, for I perceived that I had slept away a day, and that the sun was setting for another night. And yet it mattered little, for night or daytime there was no light to help me in this horrible place; and though my eyes had grown accustomed to the gloom, I could make out nothing to show me where to work.
  2. A depressing, despondent, or melancholic atmosphere.
  3. Cloudiness or heaviness of mind; melancholy; aspect of sorrow; low spirits; dullness.
    • 1770, Edmund Burke, Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents:
      A sullen gloom and furious disorder prevailed by fits.
  4. A drying oven used in gunpowder manufacture.

Derived terms

  • doom and gloom
  • gloomies
  • gloomily
  • gloomy

Related terms

  • gloam

Translations

Verb

gloom (third-person singular simple present glooms, present participle glooming, simple past and past participle gloomed)

  1. (intransitive) To be dark or gloomy.
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      The black gibbet glooms beside the way.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the "Stranger People's" Country, Nebraska 2005, p. 189:
      Around all the dark forest gloomed.
  2. (intransitive) To look or feel sad, sullen or despondent.
    • a. 1930, D. H. Lawrence, The Lovely Lady
      Ciss was a big, dark-complexioned, pug-faced young woman who seemed to be glooming about something.
  3. (transitive) To render gloomy or dark; to obscure; to darken.
    • A black yew gloom'd the stagnant air.
  4. (transitive) To fill with gloom; to make sad, dismal, or sullen.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Merlin and Vivien
      Such a mood as that which lately gloomed your fancy.
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      What sorrows gloomed that parting day.
  5. To shine or appear obscurely or imperfectly; to glimmer.

Source: wiktionary.org
  • to become dark.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)