Sere in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does sere mean? Is sere a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is sere worth? sere how many points in Words With Friends? What does sere mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for sere

See how to calculate how many points for sere.

Is sere a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word sere is a Scrabble US word. The word sere is worth 4 points in Scrabble:

S1E1R1E1

Is sere a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word sere is a Scrabble UK word and has 4 points:

S1E1R1E1

Is sere a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word sere is a Words With Friends word. The word sere is worth 4 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1E1R1E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Sere

You can make 15 words from 'sere' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.

4 letters words from 'sere'

ERES 4REES 4
SEER 4SERE 4

3 letters words from 'sere'

ERE 3ERS 3
REE 3RES 3
SEE 3SER 3

2 letters words from 'sere'

EE 2ER 2
ES 2RE 2

All 4 letters words made out of sere

sere esre sree rsee erse rese seer eser seer eser eesr eesr sree rsee sere esre rese erse eres rees eers eers rees eres

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word sere. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in sere.

Definitions and meaning of sere

sere

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɪə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɪ(ə)ɹ/
  • Homophone: seer

Etymology 1

From Middle English ser, sere, seare, seer, seere, seir, seyr (dry, withered; emaciated, shrivelled; brittle; bare; dead, lifeless; barren, useless), from Old English sēar, sīere (dry, withered; barren; sere), from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz (dry, parched), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂sews-, *sh₂ews- (to be dry). Cognate with Dutch zoor (dry and coarse), Greek αὖος (aὖos, dry), Lithuanian sausas (dry), Middle Low German sôr (Low German soor (arid, dry)), Old Church Slavonic suχŭ (suχŭ, dry),. Doublet of sear and sare.

Adjective

sere (comparative serer, superlative serest)

  1. (archaic or literary, poetic) Without moisture; dry.
    Synonyms: (Britain, archaic) sare, sear; see also Thesaurus:dry
  2. (obsolete) Of fabrics: threadbare, worn out.
Derived terms
  • wood-sere
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin serere, present active infinitive of serō (to entwine, interlace, link together; to join in a series, string together), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind, tie together; to thread).

Noun

sere (plural seres)

  1. (ecology) A natural succession of animal or plant communities in an ecosystem, especially a series of communities succeeding one another from the time a habitat is unoccupied to the point when a climax community is achieved. [from early 20th c.]
    Synonym: seral community
Hyponyms
  • hydrosere
  • lithosere
  • psammosere
Derived terms
  • seral
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old French serre (modern French serre (talon)), from serrer (to grip tightly; to shut) (modern French serrer (to squeeze; to tighten)), from Vulgar Latin serrāre (to close, shut), from Late Latin serāre, present active infinitive of serō (to fasten with a bolt; to bar, bolt), from sera (bar for fastening doors), from serō (to bind or join together; entwine, interlace, interweave, plait); see further at etymology 2.

Noun

sere (plural seres)

  1. (obsolete) A claw, a talon.

Etymology 4

From Middle English ser, sere, schere, seer, seere, seir, seyr, seyre (different; diverse, various; distinct, individual; parted, separated; many, several), from Old Norse sér (for oneself; separately, dative reflexive pronoun, literally to oneself), from sik (oneself, myself, yourself, herself, himself; ourselves, yourselves, themselves), from Proto-Germanic *sek (oneself), from Proto-Indo-European *swé (self). The English word is cognate with Danish sær (singular), især (especially, particularly), German sich (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Icelandic sig (oneself; herself, himself, itself; themselves), Latin (herself, himself, itself; themselves), Scots seir, Swedish sär (particularly).

Adjective

sere (comparative more sere, superlative most sere)

  1. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Individual, separate, set apart.
  2. (obsolete or Britain, dialectal) Different; diverse.
Alternative forms
  • seer
Derived terms
  • serely

References

Further reading

  • sere (ecology) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • EERs, Erse, REEs, Rees, SEER, eres, rees, rese, seer

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛrɛ]

Verb

sere

  1. third-person singular present indicative of srát

Friulian

Etymology

From Late Latin sēra, from ellipsis of Latin sēra diēs, from sērus (late). Compare Italian sera, Venetian séra, Romansch saira, seira, Romanian seară, French soir.

Noun

sere f (plural seris)

  1. evening

Derived terms

  • buine sere

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French serrer.

Verb

sere

  1. tighten, squeeze

Adjective

sere

  1. tight

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈse.re/
  • Hyphenation: sé‧re
  • Rhymes: -ere

Noun

sere f

  1. plural of sera

Anagrams

  • erse, rese

Latin

Etymology 1

Form of the verb serō (I sow or plant).

Verb

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 2

Form of the verb serō (I join or weave).

Verb

sere

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of serō

Etymology 3

Form of sērus.

Adjective

sēre

  1. vocative masculine singular of sērus

Leonese

Etymology

From Latin esse (to be). The present subjunctive is influenced by Latin sedeō (sit) (present infinitive sedēre).

Verb

sere

  1. to be

Conjugation

References

  • AEDLL

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch sēro. Equivalent to sêer +‎ -e.

Adverb

sêre

  1. strongly, very, to a great degree
  2. hard, forcefully
  3. fast, with speed

Descendants

  • Dutch: zeer
  • Limburgish: zieër

Further reading

  • “sere”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “sere”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English sēar, from Proto-Germanic *sauzaz. Doublet of sor (sorrel).

Alternative forms

  • ser, seere, seer, seir

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɛːr/

Adjective

sere

  1. (especially referring to plants) dry, withered, shrunken, brittle
Descendants
  • English: sear, sere, sare
References
  • “sēr(e, adj.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 26 March 2018.

Etymology 2

From Old Norse sér, dative of sik, from Proto-Germanic *siz, dative and instrumental of *sek, from Proto-Indo-European *swé (self).

Alternative forms

  • ser, schere, seer, seere, seir, seyr, seyre

Pronunciation

  • (adjective) IPA(key): /seːr/
  • (adverb) IPA(key): /ˈseːr(ə)/

Adjective

sere

  1. Individual, separate, set apart.
  2. Different; diverse.
  3. Numerous, many, copious.
References
  • “sẹ̄r(e, adj.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 April 2019.
Descendants
  • English: sere

Adverb

sere

  1. Separately, severally.
References
  • “sẹ̄re, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 10 August 2019.

Etymology 3

From Old French seür.

Adjective

sere

  1. Alternative form of sure

Northern Kurdish

Adjective

sere

  1. old

Shona

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

-séré

  1. eight

Inflection


Turkish

Alternative forms

  • sele

Noun

sere (definite accusative sereyi, plural sereler)

  1. (informal) a measure of distance, being the span, when spreading one’s fingers, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the index finger.

References

  • sere in Turkish dictionaries at Türk Dil Kurumu

Zazaki

Etymology

Related to Persian سر(sar).

Noun

sere ?

  1. (anatomy) head

Source: wiktionary.org
  • SERASKIER, (historical) a general or commander of land forces in the Turkish empire.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)