Stop in Scrabble Dictionary

Lookup Word Points and Definitions

What does stop mean? Is stop a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is stop worth? stop how many points in Words With Friends? What does stop mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for stop

See how to calculate how many points for stop.

Is stop a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word stop is a Scrabble US word. The word stop is worth 6 points in Scrabble:

S1T1O1P3

Is stop a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word stop is a Scrabble UK word and has 6 points:

S1T1O1P3

Is stop a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word stop is a Words With Friends word. The word stop is worth 7 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

S1T1O1P4

Our tools

Valid words made from Stop

You can make 20 words from 'stop' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'stop'

OPTS 6POST 6
POTS 6SPOT 6
STOP 6TOPS 6

3 letters words from 'stop'

OPS 5OPT 5
POS 5POT 5
PST 5SOP 5
SOT 3TOP 5

2 letters words from 'stop'

OP 4OS 2
PO 4SO 2
ST 2TO 2

All 4 letters words made out of stop

stop tsop sotp ostp tosp otsp stpo tspo spto psto tpso ptso sopt ospt spot psot opst post tops otps tpos ptos opts pots

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word stop. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in stop.

Definitions and meaning of stop

stop

Translingual

Etymology

From English full stop

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈstɔp]

Noun

stop

  1. Code word for a full stop in the NATO/ICAO spelling alphabet

References


Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: stŏp, IPA(key): /stɒp/
  • (General American) enPR: stäp, IPA(key): /stɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Etymology 1

From Middle English stoppen, stoppien, from Old English stoppian (to stop, close), from Proto-West Germanic *stuppōn, from Proto-Germanic *stuppōną (to stop, close), *stuppijaną (to push, pierce, prick), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewp-, *(s)tewb- (to push; stick), from *(s)tew- (to bump; impact; butt; push; beat; strike; hit). Cognate with Saterland Frisian stopje (to stop, block), West Frisian stopje (to stop), Dutch stoppen (to stop), Low German stoppen (to stop), German stopfen (to be filling, stuff), German stoppen (to stop), Danish stoppe (to stop), Swedish stoppa (to stop), Icelandic stoppa (to stop), Middle High German stupfen, stüpfen (to pierce). More at stuff, stump.

Alternate etymology derives Proto-Germanic *stuppōną from an assumed Vulgar Latin *stūpāre, *stuppāre (to stop up with tow), from stūpa, stīpa, stuppa (tow, flax, oakum), from Ancient Greek στύπη (stúpē), στύππη (stúppē, tow, flax, oakum). This derivation, however, is doubtful, as the earliest instances of the Germanic verb do not carry the meaning of "stuff, stop with tow". Rather, these senses developed later in response to influence from similar sounding words in Latin and Romance.

Verb

stop (third-person singular simple present stops, present participle stopping, simple past and past participle stopped)

  1. (intransitive) To cease moving.
  2. (intransitive) To not continue.
  3. (transitive) To cause (something) to cease moving or progressing.
  4. (transitive) To cease; to no longer continue (doing something).
  5. (transitive) To cause (something) to come to an end.
  6. (transitive) To close or block an opening.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, photography, often with "up" or "down") To adjust the aperture of a camera lens.
  8. (intransitive) To stay; to spend a short time; to reside or tarry temporarily.
    • 1887, R. D. Blackmore, Springhaven
      by stopping at home till the money was gone
    • 1931, E. F. Benson, Mapp & Lucia, chapter 7
      She’s not going away. She’s going to stop here forever.
  9. (music) To regulate the sounds of (musical strings, etc.) by pressing them against the fingerboard with the finger, or otherwise shortening the vibrating part.
  10. (obsolete) To punctuate.
    • if his sentences were properly stopped
  11. (nautical) To make fast; to stopper.
  12. (phonetics, transitive) To pronounce (a phoneme) as a stop.
    th-stopping
Conjugation
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing) to indicate the ending action, or the to infinitive to indicate the purpose of the interruption. See Appendix:English catenative verbs for more information.
Synonyms
  • (to cease moving): brake, desist, halt; See also Thesaurus:stop
  • (to not continue): blin, cease, desist, discontinue, halt, terminate; See also Thesaurus:desist
  • (to cause to cease moving): arrest, freeze, halt; See also Thesaurus:immobilize
  • (to cause to come to an end): blin, cancel, cease, discontinue, halt, terminate; See also Thesaurus:end
  • (to tarry): hang about, hang around, linger, loiter, pause; See also Thesaurus:tarry
  • (to reside temporarily): lodge, stop over; See also Thesaurus:sojourn
Antonyms
  • (to cease moving): continue, go, move, proceed
  • (to not continue): continue, proceed
  • (to cause to cease moving): continue, move
  • (to cause to come to an end): continue, move
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
  • the buck stops here
Descendants
  • Finnish: stop
  • French: stop
  • Hungarian: stop
  • Irish: stop
  • Italian: stop
  • Latvian: stop
  • Polish: stop
  • Portuguese: stop
  • Russian: стоп (stop)
  • Spanish: stop
  • Welsh: stopio
Translations

Noun

stop (plural stops)

  1. A (usually marked) place where buses, trams or trains halt to let passengers get on and off, usually smaller than a station.
    Related terms: halt, station.
  2. An action of stopping; interruption of travel.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Journal of the Plague Year
      It is [] doubtful [] whether it contributed anything to the stop of the infection.
    • Occult qualities put a stop to the improvement of natural philosophy.
    • It is a great step toward the mastery of our desires to give this stop to them.
  3. That which stops, impedes, or obstructs; an obstacle; an impediment.
    • A fatal stop trauerst their headlong course
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Advantages of conversing with good Men
      So melancholy a prospect should inspire us with zeal to oppose some stop to the rising torrent.
  4. A device intended to block the path of a moving object
    1. (engineering) A device, or piece, as a pin, block, pawl, etc., for arresting or limiting motion, or for determining the position to which another part shall be brought.
    2. (architecture) A member, plain or moulded, formed of a separate piece and fixed to a jamb, against which a door or window shuts.
  5. (linguistics) A consonant sound in which the passage of air through the mouth is temporarily blocked by the lips, tongue, or glottis.
    Synonyms: plosive, occlusive
  6. A symbol used for purposes of punctuation and representing a pause or separating clauses, particularly a full stop, comma, colon or semicolon.
  7. (music) A knob or pin used to regulate the flow of air in an organ.
  8. (music) One of the vent-holes in a wind instrument, or the place on the wire of a stringed instrument, by the stopping or pressing of which certain notes are produced.
  9. (tennis) A very short shot which touches the ground close behind the net and is intended to bounce as little as possible.
  10. (zoology) The depression in a dog’s face between the skull and the nasal bones.
  11. (photography) A part of a photographic system that reduces the amount of light.
  12. (photography) A unit of exposure corresponding to a doubling of the brightness of an image.
  13. (photography) An f-stop.
  14. The diaphragm used in optical instruments to cut off the marginal portions of a beam of light passing through lenses.
  15. (fencing) A coup d'arret, or stop thrust.
Derived terms
Translations
References

Punctuation

stop

  1. Used to indicate the end of a sentence in a telegram.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stoppe, from Old English stoppa (bucket, pail, a stop), from Proto-Germanic *stuppô (vat, vessel), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teub- (to push, hit; stick, stump). Cognate with Norwegian stopp, stoppa (deep well, recess), Middle High German stubech, stübich (barrel, vat, unit of measure) (German Stübchen). Related also to Middle Low German stōp (beaker, flask), Middle High German stouf (beaker, flask), Norwegian staupa (goblet), Icelandic staupa (shot-glass), Old English stēap (a stoup, beaker, drinking vessel, cup, flagon). Cognate to Albanian shtambë (amphora, bucket). See stoup.

Noun

stop (plural stops)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A small well-bucket; a milk-pail.
Translations

Etymology 3

s- +‎ top

Adjective

stop (not comparable)

  1. (physics) Being or relating to the squark that is the superpartner of a top quark.

Anagrams

  • OTPs, POST, POTS, PTOs, Post, Spot, TPOs, opts, post, post-, post., pots, spot, tops

Danish

Verb

stop

  1. imperative of stoppe

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɔp/
  • Hyphenation: stop
  • Rhymes: -ɔp

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch stoppe.

Noun

stop m (plural stoppen, diminutive stopje n)

  1. An action of stopping, cessation.
  2. A plug for a sink, a stopper.
  3. An electric fuse.
    Synonyms: smeltstop, zekering
Derived terms
  • smeltstop
  • stopcontact
  • stoppenkast

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

stop

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stoppen
  2. imperative of stoppen

Anagrams

  • post
  • spot

Finnish

Interjection

stop

  1. stop (halt)
  2. stop (end-of-sentence indicator in telegrams)

Synonyms

  • (halt): seis

French

Etymology

1792. Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɔp/

Interjection

stop!

  1. stop!

Noun

stop m (uncountable)

  1. stop sign
  2. hitchhiking

Related terms

  • auto-stop
  • stop-motion
  • stopper

Descendants

  • Moroccan Arabic: سطوب

Further reading

  • “stop” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • pots, spot

Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃtopː], [ˈʃtop]
  • Rhymes: -opː, -op

Interjection

stop

  1. halt! stop!

Punctuation

stop

  1. stop (used to indicate the end of a sentence in a telegram)

Noun

stop (plural stopok)

  1. (colloquial) stop sign (a red sign on the side of a street instructing vehicles to stop)
  2. (colloquial) hitchhike (an act of hitchhiking, trying to get a ride in a passing vehicle while standing at the side of a road)

Declension

Derived terms

  • stopfürdő
  • stoptábla

Irish

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop, from Middle English stoppen, from Old English stoppian (to stop, close), from Proto-Germanic *stuppōną (to stop, close).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sˠt̪ˠɔpˠ/

Verb

stop (present analytic stopann, future analytic stopfaidh, verbal noun stopadh, past participle stoptha)

  1. to stop

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • stad

Noun

stop m (genitive singular stop, nominative plural stopanna)

  1. a stop (place to get on and off line buses or trams; interruption of travel; device to block path)

Declension

Synonyms

  • stad

Further reading

  • “stopaid”, in Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors, eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, 2019
  • "stop" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop!

  1. stop!, halt!

Noun

stop m (plural stop)

  1. stop (roadsign; bus stop etc; block)

Anagrams

  • post
  • spot

Latvian

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop!

  1. stop!, halt!

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɔp/

Etymology 1

Deverbal of stopić.

Noun

stop m inan

  1. (chemistry) an alloy; a mixture of metals.
Declension
Synonyms
  • aliaż (obsolete)

Verb

stop

  1. second-person singular imperative of stopić

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English stop.

Interjection

stop

  1. stop!, halt!

Noun

stop m inan

  1. a stop sign.
  2. (colloquial) a vehicle's brake light.
  3. (colloquial) hitchhiking.

Further reading

  • stop in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • stop in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈstɔp/, /ˈstɔ.pi/

Noun

stop m (plural stops)

  1. stop (function or button that causes a device to stop operating)
  2. (uncountable) A game in which the players write on paper one word from each category (animal, fruit, etc.), all beginning with the same letter, as quickly as possible. In Spanish: tutti frutti.
  3. (stock market) stop loss order (order to close one’s position if the market drops to a specified price level)
  4. (Brazil, upper-class slang) stop; end (the act of putting a stop to something)

Interjection

stop!

  1. Said by a player of the game of stop to cease the current turn, after which the players count how many words they wrote.

See also

  • CEP (acronym of "cidade, estado, país", meaning "city, state, country", a category in the game of stop)

Further reading

  • Stop! on the Portuguese Wikipedia.Wikipedia pt

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English stop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈtop/, [esˈt̪op]

Interjection

stop

  1. stop

Swedish

Noun

stop n

  1. beer mug.
  2. stoup

Declension

Synonyms

  • sejdel

Anagrams

  • post

Source: wiktionary.org
  • STOOZE, to borrow money at an interest rate of 0%, a rate typically offered by credit card companies as an incentive for new customers.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)