Take in Scrabble Dictionary

What does take mean? Is take a Scrabble word?

How many points in Scrabble is take worth? take how many points in Words With Friends? What does take mean? Get all these answers on this page.

Scrabble® and Words with Friends® points for take

See how to calculate how many points for take.

Is take a Scrabble word?

Yes. The word take is a Scrabble US word. The word take is worth 8 points in Scrabble:

T1A1K5E1

Is take a Scrabble UK word?

Yes. The word take is a Scrabble UK word and has 8 points:

T1A1K5E1

Is take a Words With Friends word?

Yes. The word take is a Words With Friends word. The word take is worth 8 points in Words With Friends (WWF):

T1A1K5E1

Our tools

Valid words made from Take

You can make 21 words from 'take' in our Scrabble US and Canada dictionary.


4 letters words from 'take'

KETA 8TAKE 8
TEAK 8 

3 letters words from 'take'

AKE 7ATE 3
EAT 3ETA 3
KAE 7KAT 7
KEA 7KET 7
TAE 3TAK 7
TEA 3 

2 letters words from 'take'

AE 2AT 2
EA 2ET 2
KA 6TA 2
TE 2 

All 4 letters words made out of take

take atke tkae ktae akte kate taek atek teak etak aetk eatk tkea ktea teka etka keta ekta aket kaet aekt eakt keat ekat

Note: these 'words' (valid or invalid) are all the permutations of the word take. These words are obtained by scrambling the letters in take.

Definitions and meaning of take

take

Etymology

From Middle English taken (to take, lay hold of, grasp, strike), from Old English tacan (to grasp, touch), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse taka (to touch, take), from Proto-Germanic *tēkaną (to touch), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₁g- (to touch). Gradually displaced Middle English nimen ("to take"; see nim), from Old English niman (to take). Cognate with Icelandic and Norwegian Nynorsk taka (to take), Norwegian Bokmål ta (to take), Swedish ta (to take), Danish tage (to take, seize), Middle Dutch taken (to grasp), Dutch taken (to take; grasp), Middle Low German tacken (to grasp). Compare tackle.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: tāk, IPA(key): /teɪk/, [tʰeɪ̯k]
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present takes, present participle taking, simple past took, past participle taken)

  1. (transitive) To get into one's hands, possession, or control, with or without force.
    1. (transitive) To seize or capture.
    2. (transitive) To catch or get possession of (fish or game).
    3. (transitive, cricket) To catch the ball; especially as a wicket-keeper and after the batsman has missed or edged it.
    4. (transitive) To appropriate or transfer into one's own possession, sometimes by physically carrying off.
    5. (transitive) To exact.
    6. (transitive) To capture or win (a piece or trick) in a game.
  2. (transitive) To receive or accept (something) (especially something given or bestowed, awarded, etc).
    • Bible, Numbers xxxv.31:
      Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer.
    1. (transitive) To receive or accept (something) as payment or compensation.
    2. (transitive) To accept and follow (advice, etc).
    3. (transitive) To receive into some relationship.
    4. (transitive, intransitive, law) To receive or acquire (property) by law (e.g. as an heir).
      • 1832, Lodge v Simonton, in Reports of Cases Adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, page 442:
        There was no intestacy, and they did not take under the will as heirs, []
      • 1913, Conrad v Conrad et al (Court of Appeals of Kentucky, Feb. 25, 1913), in The Southwestern Reporter, volumes 153-154, page 741:
        The only interest they have in the land arises under the will of E. J. Turnham, under which they take one half of the land.
  3. (transitive) To remove.
    1. (transitive) To remove or end by death; to kill.
    2. (transitive) To subtract.
  4. (transitive) To have sex with.
    • 2014 July 3, Susan Calman, during Mock the Week, series 13, episode 4:
      And the queen takes the bishop... this is turning out to be quite the royal wedding!
  5. (transitive) To defeat (someone or something) in a fight.
  6. (transitive) To grasp or grip.
  7. (transitive) To select or choose; to pick.
    • Bible, 1 Samuel xiv 42:
      Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken.
  8. (transitive) To adopt (select) as one's own.
  9. (transitive) To carry or lead (something or someone).
    1. (transitive, especially of a vehicle) To transport or carry; to convey to another place.
    2. (transitive, of a path, road, etc.) To lead (to a place); to serve as a means of reaching.
    3. (transitive) To pass (or attempt to pass) through or around.
    4. (transitive) To escort or conduct (a person).
      • 2002(?), J. R. R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
        They're taking the Hobbits to Isengard!
    5. (reflexive) To go.
      • 2007, Edwin Mullins, The Popes of Avignon, Blue Bridge, 2008, page 59
        Nicholas then took himself to Avignon where in August 1330 he formally renounced his claim to the papacy.
  10. (transitive) To use as a means of transportation.
  11. (obsolete) To visit; to include in a course of travel.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Penn, Travels in Holland, etc:
      Almost a year since, R. B. and B. F. took that city, in the way from Frederickstadt to Amsterdam, and gave them a visit.
    • 1827, Wesleyan Methodism in Manchester and its vicinity, volume 1, page 7:
      Mr. Clayton had not been long in his new situation, before Mr. Wasley tendered his personal respects to him; "For in May (1733), he set out for Epsworth, and took Manchster in his way to see him."
  12. (transitive) To obtain for use by payment or lease.
    1. (transitive) To obtain or receive regularly by (paid) subscription.
  13. (transitive) To consume.
    1. (transitive) To receive (medicine) into one's body, e.g. by inhalation or swallowing; to ingest.
    2. (transitive) To partake of (food or drink); to consume.
      • To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric. He was, a year ago, just fifty-nine. Alas! he has not even reached his grand climacteric. Already he is gone. He was cut off by pneumonia, or apoplexy, last Christmas.
  14. (transitive) To experience, undergo, or endure.
    1. (transitive) To undergo; to put oneself into, to be subjected to.
    2. (transitive) To experience or feel.
    3. (transitive) To submit to; to endure (without ill humor, resentment, or physical failure).
    4. (transitive) To participate in.
    5. (transitive) To suffer, to endure (a hardship or damage).
  15. (transitive) To cause to change to a specified state or condition.
    He had to take it apart to fix it.
    She took down her opponent in two minutes.
  16. (transitive) To regard in a specified way.
  17. (transitive) To conclude or form (a decision or an opinion) in the mind.
  18. (transitive) To understand (especially in a specified way).
    • 1853, The American Journal of Science and Arts, page 125:
      The author explained the theory of Dove, which, if we took him correctly, was, that the lustre of bodies and particularly the metallic lustre arose from the light coming from the one stratum of the superficial particles of bodies interfering on the eye []
  19. (transitive) To accept or be given (rightly or wrongly); assume (especially as if by right).
  20. (transitive) To believe, to accept the statements of.
    • c. 1674-1718, Nicholas Rowe:
      I take thee at thy word.
  21. (transitive) To assume or suppose; to reckon; to regard or consider.
  22. (transitive) To draw, derive, or deduce (a meaning from something).
    • c. 1630-1694,, John Tillotson, Sermon V, The Excellency of the Christian Religion:
      And the firm belief of a future Judgment, which shall render to every man according to his deeds, if it be well consider'd, is to a reasonable nature the most forcible motive of all other to a good life; because it is taken from the consideration of the greatest and most lasting happiness and misery that human nature is capable of.
  23. (transitive) To derive (as a title); to obtain from a source.
  24. (transitive) To catch or contract (an illness, etc).
  25. (transitive) To come upon or catch (in a particular state or situation).
  26. (transitive) To captivate or charm; to gain or secure the interest or affection of.
    • Bible, Proverbs vi.25:
      Neither let her take thee with her eyelids.
    • (Can we date this quote by William Wake and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience.
    • (Can we date this quote by Thomas Moore and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, — a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, — which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions.
  27. (transitive, of a material) To absorb or be impregnated by (dye, ink, etc); to be susceptible to being treated by (polish, etc).
  28. (transitive, of a ship) To let in (water).
  29. (transitive) To require.
    • 1920, China Monthly Review 15, page 357:
      If the summary of the Tientsin society is accurate, a famine population of more than 14,000,000 is already bad enough. If it takes five dollars to keep one of them alive, []
    • 2009, Living It Out →ISBN:
      While it takes courage to come out, the acceptance of parents and other family members can really help the person coming out to accept themselves.
  30. (transitive) To proceed to fill.
  31. (transitive) To fill, to use up (time or space).
  32. (transitive) To avail oneself of.
  33. (transitive) To practice; perform; execute; carry out; do.
    • To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric.
  34. (transitive) To assume or perform (a form or role).
    1. (transitive) To assume (a form).
    2. (transitive) To perform (a role).
    3. (transitive) To assume and undertake the duties of (a job, an office, etc).
  35. (transitive) To bind oneself by.
  36. (transitive) To move into.
  37. (transitive) To go into, through, or along.
  38. (transitive) To have and use one's recourse to.
  39. (transitive) To ascertain or determine by measurement, examination or inquiry.
  40. (transitive) To write down; to get in, or as if in, writing.
  41. (transitive) To make (a photograph, film, or other reproduction of something).
  42. (transitive, dated) To take a picture, photograph, etc of (a person, scene, etc).
  43. (transitive) To obtain money from, especially by swindling.
  44. (transitive, now chiefly by enrolling in a class or course) To apply oneself to the study of.
  45. (transitive) To deal with.
  46. (transitive) To consider in a particular way, or to consider as an example.
  47. (transitive, baseball) To decline to swing at (a pitched ball); to refrain from hitting at, and allow to pass.
  48. (transitive) To accept as an input to a relation.
    1. (transitive, grammar) To have to be used with (a certain grammatical form, etc).
    2. (transitive, mathematics, computing) To accept (zero or more arguments).
  49. (intransitive) To get or accept (something) into one's possession.
  50. (intransitive) To engage, take hold or have effect.
    1. (Of ink; dye; etc.) To adhere or be absorbed properly.
    2. (of a plant, etc) To begin to grow after being grafted or planted; to (literally or figuratively) take root, take hold.
      • 1884, Stephen Bleecker Luce, Text-book of Seamanship, page 179:
        The cradles are supported under their centres by shores, on which the keel takes.
    3. (of a mechanical device) To catch; to engage.
      • 2009, Sheldon Russell, The Yard Dog: A Mystery, page 210:
        At the depot, Hook climbed out, slamming the door twice before the latch took.
    4. (possibly dated) To win acceptance, favor or favorable reception; to charm people.
      • c. 1672-1719, Joseph Addison:
        Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, / And hint he writ it, if the thing should take.
    5. To have the intended effect.
      • 1967, Richard Martin Stern, The Kessler Legacy, page 103:
        "When I was young," I said, "I was vaccinated with religion, but the vaccination didn't take."
  51. (intransitive) To become; to be affected in a specified way.
  52. (intransitive, possibly dated) To be able to be accurately or beautifully photographed.
  53. (intransitive, dialectal, proscribed) An intensifier.
  54. (transitive, obsolete) To deliver, bring, give (something) to (someone).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter xj, in Le Morte Darthur, book XIII:
      for thy loue I haue lefte my countrey / And sythe ye shalle departe oute of this world / leue me somme token of yours that I may thynke on you / Ioseph said that wille I doo ful gladly / Now brynge me your sheld that I toke yow whanne ye went in to bataille ageynst kyng Tolleme
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew 22.19:
      Jesus perceaved there wylynes, and sayde: Why tempte ye me ye ypocrytes? lett me se the tribute money. And they toke hym a peny.
  55. (transitive, obsolete outside dialects and slang) To give or deliver (a blow, to someone); to strike or hit.

Usage notes

In a few informal sociolects, took is sometimes replaced by the proscribed form taked.

Quotations

  • 1611 — King James Version of the Bible, Luke 1:1
    Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us []
  • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
    When flame suddenly taketh and openeth, [it] giveth a noise.
  • (Can we date this quote by John Dryden and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
    Beauty alone could beauty take so right.
  • 1973, Albert J. Reiss, The Police and the Public, page 44:
    A lot of officers when they knock off a still will take an axe to the barrels.

Synonyms

  • (to get into one's possession): confiscate, seize; see also Thesaurus:take
  • (military: to gain a position by force): capture, conquer, seize
  • (to receive or accept something): garner, get, obtain, win; see also Thesaurus:receive
  • (to remove): knock off, subduct; see also Thesaurus:remove
  • (to kill): do in, off, terminate; see also Thesaurus:kill
  • (to subtract): take away; see also Thesaurus:subtract
  • (to have sex with): have, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  • (to defeat in a fight): beat
  • (to grasp with the hands): grab, grasp, grip, nim; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  • (to consume): ingest, swallow

Antonyms

  • (to accept): give
  • (to carry): bring
  • drop

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. The or an act of taking.
    • 1999, Impacts of California sea lions and Pacific harbor seals [...] (published by the United States National Marine Fisheries Service), page 32:
      The 1994 Amendments address the incidental take of marine mammals in the course of commercial fishing, not the direct lethal take of pinnipeds for management purposes.
  2. Something that is taken; a haul.
    1. Money that is taken in, (legal or illegal) proceeds, income; (in particular) profits.
      • 2018 November 27, Paul Krugman, “The Depravity of Climate-Change Denial”, The New York Times, page A22:
        Money is still the main answer: Almost all prominent climate deniers are on the fossil-fuel take.
    2. The or a quantity of fish, game animals or pelts, etc which have been taken at one time; catch.
  3. An interpretation or view, opinion or assessment; perspective.
  4. An approach, a (distinct) treatment.
  5. (film) A scene recorded (filmed) at one time, without an interruption or break; a recording of such a scene.
  6. (music) A recording of a musical performance made during an uninterrupted single recording period.
  7. A visible (facial) response to something, especially something unexpected; a facial gesture in response to an event.
  8. (medicine) An instance of successful inoculation/vaccination.
  9. (rugby, cricket) A catch of the ball (in cricket, especially one by the wicket-keeper).
  10. (printing) The quantity of copy given to a compositor at one time.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take
  • intake
  • outtake
  • spit take
  • taking, taking
  • uptake

References

Anagrams

  • Kate, kate, keta, teak

Japanese

Romanization

take

  1. Rōmaji transcription of たけ

Marshallese

Etymology

Borrowed from English turkey, named after Turkey, from Middle English Turkye, from French Turquie, Medieval Latin Turcia, from Turcus (Turk), from Byzantine Greek Τοῦρκος (Toûrkos), from Persian ترک(Turk), from Middle Persian twlk' (Turk), from an Old Turkic autonym, Türk or Türük.

Pronunciation

  • (phonetic) IPA(key): [tˠɑɡe]
  • (phonemic) IPA(key): /tˠækej/
  • Bender phonemes: {takȩy}

Noun

take

  1. a turkey

References

  • Marshallese–English Online Dictionary

Mauritian Creole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /take/

Etymology

From French taquet.

Noun

take

  1. power switch.

Middle English

Etymology 1

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present taketh, present participle takende, first-/third-person singular past indicative toke, past participle taken)

  1. Alternative form of taken

Verb

take

  1. Alternative form of taken: past participle of taken

Etymology 2

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. Alternative form of tak (tack (small nail))

Etymology 3

Verb

take (third-person singular simple present taketh, present participle takende, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle taked)

  1. Alternative form of takken

Etymology 4

Noun

take (plural takes)

  1. Alternative form of tak (tack (fee paid to keep swine))

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

take (present tense tek, past tense tok, past participle teke, passive infinitive takast, present participle takande, imperative tak)

  1. Alternative form of taka

Pilagá

Verb

take

  1. want
    se-takeI want

References

  • 2001, Alejandra Vidal, quoted in Subordination in Native South-American Languages

Source: wiktionary.org
  • (Nahuatl) a gum resin yielded by various tropical trees.
    (source: Collins Scrabble Dictionary)